Lone Pine Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by Africancrab
  • Things to Do
    by Africancrab
  • Things to Do
    by Africancrab

Most Recent Things to Do in Lone Pine

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    MOVIE FLATS

    by travelgourmet Updated Jan 16, 2015

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    Located within the Alabama Hills is the Movie Flats area. North of the main Alabama Hills, this area had many movies filmed on location, here. "High Sierra", "Gunga Din", "Rawhide", "Maverick", and "How the West Was Won" were some of the movies that had many scenes filmed here. TV even saw the Alabama Hills in shows like Star Trek and the Twilight Zone. Want a backdrop for a science fiction show, then head for the Alabama Hills. For a Movie Road Touring Brochure see the website below.

    STORY OF MOVIE FLATS A GREAT PLACE TO STOP YAHOO, LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION. SOMEWHERE ON A FORBIDDEN PLANET SHADES OF 2001, A SPACE ODESSEY
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    ALABAMA HILLS IN CALIFORNIA

    by travelgourmet Updated Jan 16, 2015

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    Alabama Hills, California that is, stretches out for miles, parallel to the town of Lone Pine, CA. Only 2 1/2 miles to the west of town, this is a must see when driving Hwy 395. If you ever wondered why a lot of westerns and even other movies such as Star Trek and Gladiator have a similiar look in some scenes, it is because they were filmed at the Alabama Hills. The name was given to the area by gold seeking Southern sympathizers during the Civil War in 1864 to honor and celebrate a Confederate cruiser named the Alabama which had sunk, burned or captured over 60 Federal ships in less than 2 years. The name stuck.

    Many odd size and odd shaped granite boulders, some the size of small hills, dot the landscape. You can drive through, around, and into the Alabama Hills. Hiking is one way to get close up and personal with these intriguing rocks. The main drive is paved, but very rocky and rough. Many of the roads are actually dirt trails, so watch the roads as well as the boulders. Many of the road trails end upbruptly, so drive slowly on the dirt roads or your vehicle can get stuck or dropped off a dead end trail. The view of the many mountains and peaks, including Mt. Whitney , are enjoyed from the vantage point of the Alabama Hills. At present, it is remote with no facilities such as food, drink, restrooms, or gasoline. Be prepared before leaving the town of Lone Pine for this area. Close by, but so far away.

    SELF EXPLAINING ALABAMA HILLS ARE #ONE PREHISTORIC SKULL OR BOULDER ARCH ROCK SEE FOR YOURSELF THE CREATURES OF THE ROCKS
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    Wedding of the Waters Pageant Mural

    by Yaqui Written Oct 5, 2014

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    This mural is in celebration of event that took place in 1937. The pageant weekend in 1937 was created by Father Crowley and locals to celebrate the opening of the much needed new paved road section connecting Owen Valley to Death Valley and points east.

    Friday morning a special gourd of water was scooped from the highest lake in the USA, north of Mt. Whitney. It was carried down teep trails to Whitney Portal at roads end. That afternoon three Pony Express tyep local horsemen took the water down to the Bank of America in Lone Pine for the first night. Participants in the many special events included Governor Merriam of California, Movie Stars, decendents of the ill-fated Sierra Donner Party and Death Valley 49ers.

    Saturday the water gourd was carried short distances south by local drivers and historic conveyances to Keeler train station for the second night.

    Sunday a car and driver took the water south to the Road Opening Ceremony, then down to the Union Oil plane at Panamint Dry Lake. The pilot then flew the water to Death Valley headquarters at Furnance Creek for a luncheon. Near sunset he completed lthe "Weddying of the Waters, from Highest to the Lowest, Pageant" by flying south to spill the water into Badwater Springs, the lowest body of water in the USA. Moutain top campfires along the way signaled the completion of the Pageant.

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    1872 Earthquake Victims

    by blueskyjohn Updated Jul 19, 2014

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    Just north of Lone Pine on Rt 395 is the mass grave site for the victims of the 1872 earthquake that destroyed the town and many of the surrounding area. The earthquake struck at 2:10am. 27 people in Lone Pine were killed during the quake. 16 were interned at this mass grave site.

    Parking for the site is a little tricky. There is a pull off on 395 right at the site. Walk up from the road

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    The Alabama Hills

    by blueskyjohn Updated Jul 19, 2014

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    This area is just west of Lone Pine between the town and the Sierra Nevada. The area is managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The area has unique rock formations and with the backdrop of the Sierra Nevada makes beautiful scenery and very popular for taking photos. It is an excellent place to wonder around to see these rock formations. You can also camp as it is open BLM space. The area is also very popular with rock climbers and mountain bikers.

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    • National/State Park

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    Russell Spainhower Park

    by blueskyjohn Updated Jul 19, 2014

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    This was formally called Lone Park Park. Located on the east side of route 395. It is a small but nice shaded park with a stream. Plenty of shade and picnic tables. I brought my lunch here and relaxed a while. A picnic table near the stream was very relaxing. I recommend an outdoor lunch here.

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    Eastern Sierra Interagency Visitor Center

    by blueskyjohn Updated Jul 19, 2014

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    If you plan on doing any type of outdoor activity around the eastern sierra, this visitor center is a must. They have great interpretive signs and information inside. U.S.Forest Rangers are on staff behind the desk and can answer any question and make recommendations on what to see and do.

    Since it had been 10 years since I was in Lone Pine, the Rangers were a big help. They saved me a lot of time trying to decide what to do on my very short visit.

    The station is part of the Inyo National Forest. Another important think for campers and travels is they have very clean bathrooms.

    Hours:
    Monday 8:00 am – 5:00 pm
    Tuesday 8:00 am – 5:00 pm
    Wednesday 8:00 am – 5:00 pm
    Thursday 8:00 am – 5:00 pm
    Friday 8:00 am – 5:00 pm
    Saturday 8:00 am – 5:00 pm
    Sunday 8:00 am – 5:00 pm

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    Mt. Whitney

    by Africancrab Written May 18, 2013

    One of the activities you can engage in while in Lone Pine is climb Mt. Whitney. The beautiful views and snow capped mountains are breath-taking. It is the highest peak in the lower 48 states of the union. If you are a hiker or climber in California, you have probably had a conversation about this mountain. At a little over 14,000 feet, it is a challenge but one easily conquered when done in groups.

    It has been added to my Bucket list. The 22 mile hike is nothing compared to Kilimanjaro which I climbed 12 years go, but it is still a pretty tough altitude to over come.
    It is a mountain, so one has to prepare before attempting it. Just because you are an avid hiker does not mean you can actually climb it. Like any other mountain, one must train and prepare for it.

    Some of the information I gathered when I found out we would be driving through Lone Pine included how to get a permit to hike it. It's only in California that one has to win a raffle in order to climb a mountain (smile!). Getting the permit is done through a lottery system, which is a red tape by any measure.

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    Alabama Hills

    by WBeall Written Jan 3, 2013

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    The Alabama hills are a unique kind of beautiful. When I look at the hills I see western, art, and never ending rocks. The Alabama hills is where lots of old western films were filmed. They have pamphlets that will tell you exactly where to go to find the famous rocks in those particular movies. I have been here 3 times and every time I go I see a different rock that tells a new story. If you are lucky enough to have a day in Lone pine I would highly suggest taking a little hike or drive and checking out the Alabama Hills. The famous rocks are super hard to find at times but so much fun to look. Its kind of like trying to find waldo. I took my husband and I about 3 hours to find the arch (which I have been to twice before) but when we finally found it, it was well worth the search.

    Before you go... Make sure you have a print out of what rocks you are in search of because you will not have service.

    Mt. Whitney Me with the bean Movie road Steven in the Arch The Alabama Hills
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    Hike Mt. Whitney!

    by WBeall Written Sep 12, 2012

    I have tried 3 times now and have never been able to get to the top of Mt. Whitney. This is a life goal for me and I will one day. But, A day trip can be made easily by hiking to the lake. This view is breathtaking and its a great place to stop and have a pinic. You can even fish!

    My Second try on Mt. whit in 2007 3rd time to mt. Whitney with my fiance! 3rd time to mt. Whitney with my fiance!
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    • Mountain Climbing

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    Pipe of LA aqueduct

    by Yaqui Written Dec 13, 2008

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    This is 10 foot section is the product of many nationalities who toiled and labored to earn wages that were considered high paying jobs during this era. Construction began in 1908 when crews started to dig eight feet of tunnel per day at each tunnel end, for a total of 16 feet per day. Crews dug more than 22 feet per day while constructing the five-mile Elizabeth Tunnel. They finished the tunnel 20 months instead of the previous estimate of five years and finished in 1913. This section of ring was removed from the west or Lancaster that had been originally installed in 1910. It was removed to make a connection to between LA and the aqueduct. Your can see this at the Eastern Sierra Interagency Information Center.
    Mt. Whitney Ranger District

    It is open daily, 8:00am to 5pm

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    Mt. Whitney Trails

    by Yaqui Updated Dec 13, 2008

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    Mt. Whitney is at the elevation of 14,497. It is the tallest peak in the contiguous forty eight states and this countries beautiful natural masterpiece. It was first climbed in 1873 and was called previously Fishermen’s Peak. It was rename later after Josiah Whitney who investigated it to be the tallest in the country according to his 1864 geologic survey. A trail called the Portal is the entrance to the hiking trail 10.7 miles that leads to the top of Mount Whitney. The center is open 7 days a week from 8am-6pm in summer and 8am-5pm in winter. They say it takes only one day, but most take 2-3 day to hike it and make sure you check with the rangers on what the rules are and what to take with you. One thing I am certain is, you pack everything in and everything out, and that includes your waste. Yeah, I am not kidding. They have kits you can get with the park rangers. Turns out the soil cannot handle waste deposits because of the granite in the soil cannot absorb that type of content properly. So many people visit here every year for its year around beauty so that means disaster for the environment.

    Here is a great book with lots of informationHiking Mt.Whitney Trails

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    Adobe Memorial Wall

    by Yaqui Written Dec 13, 2008

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    This adobe wall is a memorial to the victims that were lost during a earthquake March 26, 1872 that claimed the lives of so many Lone Pine citizens.

    There is a original section located right behind the florist shop in the alley way. It is fenced, but there for anyone who would like to see it.

    It reads: On March 26, 1872 at 2:30AM, one of the largest earthquakes ever recorded destroyed 52 out of the 59 buildings in Lone Pine. Because of the scarcity of buildings materials the largely immigrant population of Lone Pine, (estimated 250-300) constructed buildings made of unreinforced adobe and stone.

    This adobe wall is what remains of the general store, established in 1869 by Charles and Madeleine Meysan. This wall is the only remaining example of architecture in Lone Pine before the earthquake.

    Dedicated June 17, 2000
    Slim Princess Chapter #395
    E.Clampus Vitus

    This is located in front of the shop. This is behind the florist shop in the alley.
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    Southern Inyo Museum

    by Yaqui Updated Dec 13, 2008

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    This little museum may be small but has lots of mining artifacts, ancestry family trees listed and awesome Bug Room! The gentleman who was the host was very nice to talk too and shared other interesting facts of the area. These artifacts were located at another little museum in Darwin. With Darwin becoming a ghost town, they wanted to save these and had them relocated here so we all can still enjoy them.

    Thursday thru Saturday
    9:00 AM to 4:00PM
    Oct. thru March only.

    No heat in the building:-(

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    Eastern Sierra Interagency Information Center

    by Yaqui Written Dec 13, 2008

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    Mt. Whitney Ranger District

    It is open daily, 8:00am to 5pm

    This beautiful new building has exhibits, displays, maps, brochures and so many other types of comprehensive books pertaining to the eastern Sierra Nevada and northern Mojave Desert. Lots of information displays with lots of advice to so many destinations all within Owens Valley. The theme here is, “Leave No Trace!” to protect the fragile environment here. The one purpose this center has is to remind tourist possibilities of the Owens Valley and Eastern Sierra. Nine government agencies cooperate to run the information center.

    There is a wonderful gift store and some really nice restrooms available for all visitors.

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