Lone Pine Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by Africancrab
  • Things to Do
    by Africancrab
  • Things to Do
    by Africancrab

Most Recent Things to Do in Lone Pine

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    The Alabama Hills

    by goingsolo Written Sep 8, 2006

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    Mount Whitney

    Shown at a distance in this photo. As you drive up the Whitney Portal Road, you'll pass these rust brown hills known as the Alabama Hills. There is supposed to be some good hiking in this area, but I did all of my hiking from above and, once completed, couldn't look at any type of uphill. Still, this would make a great day hiking destination.

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    Whitney Portal

    by goingsolo Written Sep 7, 2006

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    Whitney Portal is the official launching pad for hikes on and around Mount Whitney. Since its located at a higher (8000 ft plus) elevation, many people camp here before embarking on their mountain trek. Since many people camp here, many bears roam the area at night, hungry for food and toiletries (They don't actually eat toiletries. At least, I don't think so. They just like the smell.)

    In addition to eager hikers and bears, you'll find a small store at Whitney Portal as well as a place that serves great burgers and fries. I met one guy who'd just finished hiking the PCT who said he'd been dreaming about a "Whitney Burger" for days.

    The Whitney Portal is located at the end of the Whitney Portal Road, an 8 mile steep drive through the Alabama Hills and up to the base of the mountain.

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    Lone Pine Film Museum

    by Hopkid Written Aug 12, 2006

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    Photo from www.lonepinefilmhistorymuseum.org

    The museum is dedicated to the history of film making in the Lone Pine area which has been going on since the mid-1920s. A brand new facility to house exhibits and educate visitors about this history will be complete in October 2006 to coincide with the Lone Pine Film Festival. It wasn't open yet when we visited in August 2006 but it looks great from the outside with the facade reminiscent of a movie theater with large movie poster displays on the outside walls. We will definitely check it out the next time we go through Lone Pine.

    Keep checking the website for contact information once the museum opens.

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    • Historical Travel

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    Hike to the Summit of Mt. Whitney

    by Hopkid Written Aug 12, 2006

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    Mt Whtney is to the right of the Pinnacles

    Mt. Whitney, at 14,491 feet, is the highest point in the lower-48 states (all states excluding Hawaii and Alaska). It is also very accessible without any technical climbing necessary via the main Mt. Whitney Trail (10.7 miles and over 6,000 feet of elevation). Because of these facts it is a very popular trail. To limit the damage to the wilderness, the National Forest Service limits the number of hikers/backpackers via a permit system. Daily limits are 100 day hikers and 60 overnight campers. Permits are issued via a lottery held in February. Any remaining spots after the lottery can be obtained by inquiry to the NFS. There are associated fees per person to be hiking on a given permit. For all the info on how to obtain a permit, go to the website below.

    Also because of the high altitude, considerations must be made regarding possible physical problems such as severe headache, nausea, extreme tiredness/sleepiness, dizziness, etc. This is not to mention that those that have a fear of heights could experience problems at a number of spots along the trail. I do have a fear of heights but did not have a problem at any of the spots where some folks have reported to have had problems.

    I will have more detail about the hike itself on my Whitney Portal page.

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    Stars on the Rocks.

    by dutch_anna Updated Oct 1, 2005

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    Every year, in October, Lone Pine has its Film Festival. Hundreds of people come to this small town to see again the movies, that were shot in the Alabama Hills.
    I think, that you have to book accomodation in advance, then. The campground had no place for us:-( But there was room in the RV park across the street.

    The picture is from this website:
    www.cd.gov.ab.ca/.../museums_historic_sites/ index.asp

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    OWENS LAKE

    by mtncorg Written Jan 24, 2005

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    Owens Lake lying far below Al's Point

    The Owens River originates above Bishop and accounts for most of the drainage from the eastern Sierra. The river is a true Great Basin river in that it has no outlet to the sea, ending instead in the flat sink that once was a vast lake - Owens Lake. At one time, there used to be enough water in the lake to support steamboat travel. Now, with most of the water in the Owens system being taken south to the LA metroplex, what was Owens Lake is now a huge desiccated salt pan. One can find water in the lake’s middle interior - depending on the winter snow levels. Local rock shops offer gorgeous crystals that have been taken out form within the lake. Realize that if you wish to rockhound within the lake that your clothes and boots will probably be seeing their last days within that abrasive and dangerous environment - it is also easy to punch one’s foot through a salt layer.

    The best view of the lakebed is from CA 136, which leads to the east and Death Valley from Lone Pine. Even better is the view from near Al’s Point - 21 miles from Lone Pine up the Cottonwood Road, at about 9000 feet high.

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    • Hang Gliding
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    Mount Whitney

    by travelgirl3 Updated Nov 30, 2004

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    Mount Whitney, Lone Pine, California

    At 14,496', Mount Whitney is the highest point in the Continental US. It is located just outside Lone Pine and is visible just to the right of the sun-spot in this picture. Look for the 2 narrow peaks which are close together.

    Mount Whitney is also the start of the John Muir Trail which winds its way through the Sierra Nevada Mountain range. It continues for 211 miles, ending at Happy Isles in Yosemite National Park.

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    Hang Gliders at Cottonwood Mountain

    by travelgirl3 Updated Nov 25, 2004

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    Hang Gliders at Cottonwood Mountain, Lone Pine, CA

    When you visit Lone Pine, take a couple of hours and drive up the switchback which takes you up Cottonwood Mountain. At around 9,000', you come to Walt's Point where you will find a bunch of cars and vans, all with roof racks for their Hang gliders! The California coast has their surfers, inland you will find Hang gliders.

    During the hot summer months, the conditions for hang gliding are near perfect. The 'lift' generated by the thermals emanating from the desert floor can lift a glider to an altitude of 18,000', where cold and lack of oxygen become serious concerns. If you're a rookie, you're better off visiting in the Spring or Fall, when conditions are a little more forgiving. You can also take a Tandem flight, where you're strapped on to somebody with experience.

    This particular area holds the world record for the longest flight - over 200 miles from this point to Austin, Nevada. In town, many of the shops have posted signs from people willing to drive into the desert to pick up the gliders where they land. All for a fee, of course

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    Whitney Portal Falls

    by travelgirl3 Updated Nov 25, 2004

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    Whitney Portal Falls, Lone Pine, California

    Whitney Portal is located partway up Mt. Whitney, at an elevation of around 8,400'. It is one of the most popular hiking destinations in the US. From the trailhead, you can take one of a number of hikes along the trails, and see panoramic views and granite cliffs. The one I took lead to Whitney Portal Falls, pictured here.

    Due to the high altitude, it's nice & cool on a hot summer day, but remember to pace yourself - there's also less oxygen and you may find you breathing laboured, and you might feel a headache coming on.

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    Owens Lake

    by travelgirl3 Updated Nov 25, 2004

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    Owens Lake from Cottonwood Mountain, Lone Pine, CA

    From the same road up Cottonwood Mountain where you found the Hang gliders, you will also see the fabulous view of Owens Lake, which is now dry.

    Water was first diverted from the Owens River to Los Angeles in 1913, and by 1926, Owens Lake was completely dry.

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    Alabama Hills

    by travelgirl3 Written Nov 24, 2004

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    Alabama Hills, Lone Pine, California

    Running parallel to the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range are the Alabama Hills. If you've ever watched a Spaghetti Western, or a John Wayne movie, you've seen them. You can take any number of side roads through them, and you fully expect to see a cowboy ride through any minute.

    On another movie note - the film Tremors with Kevin Bacon was filmed in this area.

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    Meysan Lakes

    by mtncorg Written May 4, 2003

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    The Muir-Whitney crest from shoulder of Mt Irvine

    With all of the attention upon the Whitney Portal trail and the Cottonwood Lakes - on the other Sierran roadhead out of Lone Pine - it pays to have other options, sometimes. Meysan Lakes trail goes up 3 miles along the north side of Meysan Creek with grand views of Lone Pine Peak. Once up to the lake, you can easily walk around in the upper part of the basin. One grand view can be obtained by wandering a few hundred feet above the upper lake through grassy slopes to a shoulder of Mt Irvine. From here you can see - and hear - the Whitney Portal trail. You can gain a super perspective over most of the trail watching people below sweating their way up that trail. You also have a fantastic view over Mt Whitney and the whole Whitney Creek drainage.

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    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Camping

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    Trail Crest - How many switchbacks?

    by mtncorg Written May 4, 2003

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    Mt Hitchcock and Lakes from Trail Crest

    From Trail Camp, at 12039 feet, you begin a long climb up to the summit ridge of the Whitney range at Trail Crest, 13480 feet. Most of the trail is well-constructed switchbacks, 99 or so, with occasional problems up higher due to lingering snow or ice. Just as the altitude and the drudgery of counting switchbacks begins to get to you, you reach the crest with its magical view over the Hitchcock Lakes, Guitar Lake (look close and you will see why it is so-named), Mt Hitchcock and farther beyond to the Kaweah Ranges in the central part of the Sequoia National Park. From Trail Crest, the route up Whitney takes on an aery aspect with occasional views to the east between pinnacles along the Muir-Whitney crest. Views to the west are everpresent. The immense aspects of the upper Kern Canyon are obvious.

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    Mt Whitney III

    by mtncorg Written May 4, 2003

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    East from warm summit rocks of Whitney

    Lone Pine and the Owens Valley area a long ways away from the top of Mt Whitney. This picture shows Iceberg Lake below and the Whitney Creek canyon leading eventually to the little green spot that is Lone Pine. The Inyo Mountains look small further east.

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    Mt Whitney

    by mtncorg Written May 4, 2003

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    South off Whitney; trail on right, Mt Langely left

    Mount Whitney is what must hikers come for. The highest point in United States outside of Alaska at 14495 feet. To dayhike from the Whitney Portal, you have to obtain a day permit (Backpackers have to obtain a backcountry permit) from the Lone Pine Ranger Station in Independence. Take lots of water and figure on refilling - highest available water is at Trail Camp, a long ways from the top! This is not a hard trail, but with the altitude, the elevation gain, trail condition (ice or snow), and 22 miles you need to be in shape. There are several more demanding routes on Whitney but those are off-trail. The view from atop is magic and the payoff is grand.

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Lone Pine Things to Do

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