Lone Pine Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by Africancrab
  • Things to Do
    by Africancrab
  • Things to Do
    by Africancrab

Best Rated Things to Do in Lone Pine

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    Mt. Whitney Trails

    by Yaqui Updated Dec 13, 2008

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    Mt. Whitney is at the elevation of 14,497. It is the tallest peak in the contiguous forty eight states and this countries beautiful natural masterpiece. It was first climbed in 1873 and was called previously Fishermen’s Peak. It was rename later after Josiah Whitney who investigated it to be the tallest in the country according to his 1864 geologic survey. A trail called the Portal is the entrance to the hiking trail 10.7 miles that leads to the top of Mount Whitney. The center is open 7 days a week from 8am-6pm in summer and 8am-5pm in winter. They say it takes only one day, but most take 2-3 day to hike it and make sure you check with the rangers on what the rules are and what to take with you. One thing I am certain is, you pack everything in and everything out, and that includes your waste. Yeah, I am not kidding. They have kits you can get with the park rangers. Turns out the soil cannot handle waste deposits because of the granite in the soil cannot absorb that type of content properly. So many people visit here every year for its year around beauty so that means disaster for the environment.

    Here is a great book with lots of informationHiking Mt.Whitney Trails

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    Beverly and Jim Rogers Museum of Lone Pine Film

    by Yaqui Written Dec 13, 2008

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    What a wonderful compliment to Lone Pines history. A awesome display of local movie history with exhibits, movie posters, costumes (worn by the actual actors), saddles, movie vehicles such as vintage cars and wagons. Lets’ not forget the really cool props used in Tremors and Iron man. It was really cool to walk up to the sand worms fromTremors and be able to touch them…kind of ewwww……lol!

    They even have this wonderful 85 seat theatre that shows a 15 minute film on film history in this area. A really neat gift shop is here too.
    Open:
    Wednesday –Monday
    10am-4pm
    Free, but does accept donations and memorabilia.

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    Adobe Memorial Wall

    by Yaqui Written Dec 13, 2008

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    This is located in front of the shop.
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    This adobe wall is a memorial to the victims that were lost during a earthquake March 26, 1872 that claimed the lives of so many Lone Pine citizens.

    There is a original section located right behind the florist shop in the alley way. It is fenced, but there for anyone who would like to see it.

    It reads: On March 26, 1872 at 2:30AM, one of the largest earthquakes ever recorded destroyed 52 out of the 59 buildings in Lone Pine. Because of the scarcity of buildings materials the largely immigrant population of Lone Pine, (estimated 250-300) constructed buildings made of unreinforced adobe and stone.

    This adobe wall is what remains of the general store, established in 1869 by Charles and Madeleine Meysan. This wall is the only remaining example of architecture in Lone Pine before the earthquake.

    Dedicated June 17, 2000
    Slim Princess Chapter #395
    E.Clampus Vitus

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    Eastern Sierra Interagency Information Center

    by Yaqui Written Dec 13, 2008

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    Mt. Whitney Ranger District

    It is open daily, 8:00am to 5pm

    This beautiful new building has exhibits, displays, maps, brochures and so many other types of comprehensive books pertaining to the eastern Sierra Nevada and northern Mojave Desert. Lots of information displays with lots of advice to so many destinations all within Owens Valley. The theme here is, “Leave No Trace!” to protect the fragile environment here. The one purpose this center has is to remind tourist possibilities of the Owens Valley and Eastern Sierra. Nine government agencies cooperate to run the information center.

    There is a wonderful gift store and some really nice restrooms available for all visitors.

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    Southern Inyo Museum

    by Yaqui Updated Dec 13, 2008

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    This little museum may be small but has lots of mining artifacts, ancestry family trees listed and awesome Bug Room! The gentleman who was the host was very nice to talk too and shared other interesting facts of the area. These artifacts were located at another little museum in Darwin. With Darwin becoming a ghost town, they wanted to save these and had them relocated here so we all can still enjoy them.

    Thursday thru Saturday
    9:00 AM to 4:00PM
    Oct. thru March only.

    No heat in the building:-(

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    Pipe of LA aqueduct

    by Yaqui Written Dec 13, 2008

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    This is 10 foot section is the product of many nationalities who toiled and labored to earn wages that were considered high paying jobs during this era. Construction began in 1908 when crews started to dig eight feet of tunnel per day at each tunnel end, for a total of 16 feet per day. Crews dug more than 22 feet per day while constructing the five-mile Elizabeth Tunnel. They finished the tunnel 20 months instead of the previous estimate of five years and finished in 1913. This section of ring was removed from the west or Lancaster that had been originally installed in 1910. It was removed to make a connection to between LA and the aqueduct. Your can see this at the Eastern Sierra Interagency Information Center.
    Mt. Whitney Ranger District

    It is open daily, 8:00am to 5pm

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    Hike to the Summit of Mt. Whitney

    by Hopkid Written Aug 12, 2006

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    Mt Whtney is to the right of the Pinnacles

    Mt. Whitney, at 14,491 feet, is the highest point in the lower-48 states (all states excluding Hawaii and Alaska). It is also very accessible without any technical climbing necessary via the main Mt. Whitney Trail (10.7 miles and over 6,000 feet of elevation). Because of these facts it is a very popular trail. To limit the damage to the wilderness, the National Forest Service limits the number of hikers/backpackers via a permit system. Daily limits are 100 day hikers and 60 overnight campers. Permits are issued via a lottery held in February. Any remaining spots after the lottery can be obtained by inquiry to the NFS. There are associated fees per person to be hiking on a given permit. For all the info on how to obtain a permit, go to the website below.

    Also because of the high altitude, considerations must be made regarding possible physical problems such as severe headache, nausea, extreme tiredness/sleepiness, dizziness, etc. This is not to mention that those that have a fear of heights could experience problems at a number of spots along the trail. I do have a fear of heights but did not have a problem at any of the spots where some folks have reported to have had problems.

    I will have more detail about the hike itself on my Whitney Portal page.

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    Whitney Portal

    by mtncorg Written May 4, 2003

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    Mt Whitney looms above Whitney Creek

    The road up to the Whitney Portal goes west out of Lone Pine, first, winding through the Alabama Hills and then moving up deceiving upward sloping terrain to the base of the eastern Sierra wall itself. There the road ascends in a couple mammoth hairpins to the mouth of the Whitney Creek canyon. You are now in canyon walls so deep that you cnanot see the top of Mt Whitney anymore. The road ends at a busy campground and a little store/fast food concession. Bears also enjoy the campground so be bearwise with your camp. From the road's end, 8300 feet, begins the 11 mile trail to the top of Mt Whitney - over 6000 feet higher at 14495 feet high. Other campgrounds are further down towards Lone Pine along the Whitney Creek.

    Another wonderful trail option takes you to the Meysan Lakes

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    Mt Whitney

    by mtncorg Written May 4, 2003

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    South off Whitney; trail on right, Mt Langely left

    Mount Whitney is what must hikers come for. The highest point in United States outside of Alaska at 14495 feet. To dayhike from the Whitney Portal, you have to obtain a day permit (Backpackers have to obtain a backcountry permit) from the Lone Pine Ranger Station in Independence. Take lots of water and figure on refilling - highest available water is at Trail Camp, a long ways from the top! This is not a hard trail, but with the altitude, the elevation gain, trail condition (ice or snow), and 22 miles you need to be in shape. There are several more demanding routes on Whitney but those are off-trail. The view from atop is magic and the payoff is grand.

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    Mt Whitney III

    by mtncorg Written May 4, 2003

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    East from warm summit rocks of Whitney

    Lone Pine and the Owens Valley area a long ways away from the top of Mt Whitney. This picture shows Iceberg Lake below and the Whitney Creek canyon leading eventually to the little green spot that is Lone Pine. The Inyo Mountains look small further east.

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    Trail Crest - How many switchbacks?

    by mtncorg Written May 4, 2003

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    Mt Hitchcock and Lakes from Trail Crest

    From Trail Camp, at 12039 feet, you begin a long climb up to the summit ridge of the Whitney range at Trail Crest, 13480 feet. Most of the trail is well-constructed switchbacks, 99 or so, with occasional problems up higher due to lingering snow or ice. Just as the altitude and the drudgery of counting switchbacks begins to get to you, you reach the crest with its magical view over the Hitchcock Lakes, Guitar Lake (look close and you will see why it is so-named), Mt Hitchcock and farther beyond to the Kaweah Ranges in the central part of the Sequoia National Park. From Trail Crest, the route up Whitney takes on an aery aspect with occasional views to the east between pinnacles along the Muir-Whitney crest. Views to the west are everpresent. The immense aspects of the upper Kern Canyon are obvious.

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    Meysan Lakes

    by mtncorg Written May 4, 2003

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    The Muir-Whitney crest from shoulder of Mt Irvine

    With all of the attention upon the Whitney Portal trail and the Cottonwood Lakes - on the other Sierran roadhead out of Lone Pine - it pays to have other options, sometimes. Meysan Lakes trail goes up 3 miles along the north side of Meysan Creek with grand views of Lone Pine Peak. Once up to the lake, you can easily walk around in the upper part of the basin. One grand view can be obtained by wandering a few hundred feet above the upper lake through grassy slopes to a shoulder of Mt Irvine. From here you can see - and hear - the Whitney Portal trail. You can gain a super perspective over most of the trail watching people below sweating their way up that trail. You also have a fantastic view over Mt Whitney and the whole Whitney Creek drainage.

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    • Mountain Climbing
    • Camping

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    Hiking The Alabama Hills

    by blaird Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Hiking here is great. Lots of scrambling on the rocks, with no specific direction. If you would draw a line of the paths I have hiked in this area, it would look like one of those stupid "Family Circus" cartoons. There are no specific paths, but lot sof places to run around.

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    This is a must DO!

    by blaird Written Feb 25, 2003

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    There are some great nooks and crannies in the hills to steal a kiss or two, if you're with someone you'd like to kiss. It is a great place to hang out with you favorite person, the scenery makes it very romantic and mysterious!

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    Mount Whitney - The Highest Point in the US

    by blaird Written Feb 25, 2003

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    this is NOT Whitney, just near it!

    Mount Whitney is the highest point in the Continental US, take a drive up to Whitney portal and at least start hiking on the trails near by. To hike up to Mt Whitney you need to make a reservation in like February for the following summer/fall, so plan ahead. I saw a ranger on the trail checking for reservations when I went!

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Lone Pine Things to Do

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