Downtown, Los Angeles

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  • downtown Los Angeles off Olvera St, california
    downtown Los Angeles off Olvera St,...
    by marinarena
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    Union Station at night, Los Angeles
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    Felix the Cat sign, Los Angeles, CA
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  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Parker Center - Los Angeles Police Department

    by Yaqui Written Jan 17, 2010

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    The beautiful building replaced the orginal buildilng that was built in 1954. It was decided to rebuild since it would cost too much to seismic retrofit the old one. It was named after the Chief William H. Parker and reopened Oct of 2009.

    Located 100 W. 1st Street Los Angeles, CA 90012, just south of Los Angeles City Hall.

    Los Angeles, California Convention and Visitors Bureau
    333 S. Hope St. 18th Flr
    Los Angeles, CA 90071
    800-366-6116

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    Caltrans Building

    by Yaqui Written Jan 17, 2010

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    This is the California Department of Transportation district 7 Headquarters which stands out. The huge number 100 is the adress for the buidings. A very unique futuristic archetiture.

    Located on W. 1st Street and N. Main Street.

    Los Angeles, California Convention and Visitors Bureau
    333 S. Hope St. 18th Flr
    Los Angeles, CA 90071

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    Frank Putnam Flint Fountain

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 17, 2010

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    This plaque reads: The fountain is dedicated to and commemorates the public service of Frank Putnam Flint, United States Senator, 1905-1911. "While representing California in the US Senate in 1906, Senator Flint led the campaign to permit construction of the Los Angeles Aqueduct on federal land. The US Senate readily approved his legislative proposal. But when the House of Representatives resisted it, Senator Flint obtained the support of his friend, President Theodore Roosevelt. Soon thereafter, the House approved Senator Flint's bill. Thus, the Los Angeles Aqueduct became possible, leading to a reliable water supply from the Owens Valley and modern development of the Los Angeles region. Senator Flint's many other accomplishments included securing significant federal funding for the development of Los Angeles Harbor."

    Located within the City Hall Park on W. 1st Street and N. Main Street.

    Los Angeles, California Convention and Visitors Bureau
    333 S. Hope St. 18th Flr
    Los Angeles, CA 90071

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    Fire Department War Memorial

    by Yaqui Written Jan 17, 2010

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    Located near the corner of W.1st Street and Temple Street within the City Hall Park it is dedicated to the memory of Firemen who have lost their lives during duty. It was dedicated in 1944.

    Los Angeles, California Convention and Visitors Bureau
    333 S. Hope St. 18th Flr
    Los Angeles, CA 90071

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    Sister Cities of Los Angeles

    by Yaqui Written Jan 17, 2010

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    Located on the corner of N. Main Street and W. 1st Street. It's a unique mileage signpost with arrows pointing to Los Angeles 21 sister cities.

    Los Angeles, California Convention and Visitors Bureau
    333 S. Hope St. 18th Flr
    Los Angeles, CA 90071

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    Bella Union Hotel & The Los Angeles Star Markers

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 17, 2010

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    Located on a wall facing west towards Main Street from the Fletcher Bowron Square are two California Historical Landmark plaques. The first is the California Historical Landmark #656 Bella Union Hotel Site,

    The plaque reads: "Near this spot stood the Bella Union Hotel, long a social and political center. Here, on October 7, 1858, the first Butterfield Overland Mail stage from the east arrived 21 days after leaving St. Louis. Warren Hall was the driver, and Waterman Ormsby, a reporter, the only through passenger."

    The second one is the site of Los Angeles Star, State Historic Landmark #789. The plaque reads: "Southern California's first newspaper, The Los Angeles Star, was founded in this block on May 17, 1851 and for many years exerted a major influence upon this part of the state. Suspended temporarily from 1864 to 1868, it continued later as an effective voice of the people until its final termination date in 1879."

    Located Fletcher Bowron Square, 300 block of N Main, between Temple and Aliso Sts, Los Angeles, Ca 90012

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  • marinarena's Profile Photo

    See South Park (not the cartoon)

    by marinarena Updated Aug 22, 2009
    downtown L.A. (South Park area), California

    See NBA action and where the 2009 Project Runway L.A. contestants competed!

    For those who seek intriguing, inspiring architecture when sight-seeing, come to South Park, a growing design/fashion industrial part of downtown LA South Park is in the zone of Staples Center, Nokia Center, Convention Center, FIDM (Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandise), the popular Original Pantry House and is close the Financial District.

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    Discover St Vincent Court

    by DueSer Updated May 31, 2009

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    A Downtown Hide-a-way

    If you're downtown enjoying the architecture and looking for a place to have lunch you might try escaping down "the alley." St. Vincent Court is a small, secluded street in the middle of all the downtown hubbub. It's surrounded on three sides by tall buildings. The fourth side, the entry, is covered for part of the way so the end of the alley really feels like a secret hide-a-way.

    There are several restaurants and bakeries here with outdoor seating. Since you are half a block away from the traffic and noise, it's the perfect place to sit outside and enjoy your meal. Most of the restaurants here have a Persian tilt and it's all good, especially St. Vincent's deli, which is probably the most famous of the eateries here. The prices are average - nothing is very fancy, it's just good food.

    The best part, though, is the fact that you're dining outside in busy downtown and it doesn't feel busy at all.

    It is located just off Seventh between Broadway and Hill.

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    Oviatt Building

    by Dabs Written May 10, 2009

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    Oviatt penthouse bar
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    The highlight of the LA Conservancy's Art Deco tour was the visit to the penthouse of the Oviatt Building. Built in 1927 for James Oviatt, it was the first Art Deco building in Los Angeles, the ceiling of the lobby of the former haberdashery was covered in Lalique glass, I believe some of it is still original but much of it replaced.

    The penthouse, which was for Oviatt’s private use, features more Lalique, beautiful wood flooring, an art deco bar area and a very unique toilet. Back in Oviatt's day, the rooftop garden had a swimming pool, tennis court, putting green, clocktower and a beach of sand imported from the Riviera. Alas that is all gone now but the penthouse and rooftop garden are still used for receptions.

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    Don't overlook St. Vincent Court

    by marinarena Updated Aug 31, 2008

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    cafe dining at jewelry center court, Los Angeles
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    Years after first discovering downtown, I just stumbled across St. Vincent Court, a rather charming alley (yes, a downtown alley with charm can exist!) in an otherwise a fairly drab area. The palette of the buildings make this well-hid spot eyecatching. It is located off Broadway and Hill streets and with main entry by way of 6th. Entering here is as if you were going to a quaint, part of the Mediterrean village with a decidedly middle eastern influence atmosphere. Perhaps, you'd feel as if you were in Turkey.

    Here, is where the regulars are- particularly vendors from the jewelry center of the court's namesake. Many are of Armenian or Persian decent which reflects the food options here at the enchanting eateries, including the popular deli named after the jewelry center. Choose from kebobs, lamb gyros or hummus on the menus. Even if you want coffee, you can try an Armenian variety. There is a Frenchy cafe for your croissant fix and as well a decent pizzeria.

    Look out for the pigeons here that try to get any crumb you may leave.

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    Japanese Street Food

    by GracesTrips Written Jul 14, 2008

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    It wasn't off a cart but this came pretty close to being street food as I can see. Food on a stick, in the window. We ate some chicken balls - they were pretty good and a croquette (pronounced in Japanese as koh-roh-ke) - a mashed potato ball, breaded and fried. They also had octopus balls, shrimp balls, fish cakes and some other items.

    There was also a small restaurant inside if you prefer to dine in.

    Located at 117 Japanese Village Plaza Mall, Los Angeles.

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    The downtown "Bukowski" Post Office

    by David_trip Updated Nov 5, 2007

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    Terminal Annex Post Office

    Just in between the old mexican core of LA and Chinatown, in Alameda, you will find the Terminal Annex Post Office. What is special about this one? It's here that Bukowski gathered inspiration and material for his worldwide known underground novel “Post Office”. The inside of the building has been recently renewed so don't expect to find anything of what was told in his book. Just have a concious look at the building while passing by.

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    Best Blues Show in Town (Shh! its a secret)

    by kschmitty0 Written Apr 4, 2007

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    If you are in town on a Monday night, a truly unique experience is seeing Mickey Champion sing the blues at "Babe and Rickys". This is an old gritty, beat up bar, with the best music in town. Anybody that says L.A. has no soul would probably think twice after checking out this one of a kind show.
    9pm the band comes on, 10 PM Mickey comes out, and at 11PM free southern cooking is served buffet style. Its a trip! $8.00 to see a legend (she's about 85) hollering at the top of her lungs.

    If you google Mickey Champion you can see a trailer of her singing to get an idea...

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    Bunker Hill

    by Dabs Updated Jan 15, 2007

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    Bunker Hill Steps

    From the late 1800s until WWI, Bunker Hill was a wealthy subdivision filled with Victorian houses. After the war, the area became a slum and the wealthy fled to areas outside the city center. In the 1950s they started to redevelop Bunker Hill and leveled all the Victorian houses, the area eventually became filled with office buildings including the tallest building in LA, the US Bank Building, which is also the tallest building in the US west of Chicago.

    The Bunker Hill steps connect Hope Street to Fifth Street (between Grand and Figueroa)joining the Bunker Hill District to the rest of downtown LA. For those not wanting to exert themselves by walking up or down the 103 stairs can take the escalator or the elevator. At the top of the steps, a nude female sculpture stands over a stream that cascades to the bottom, her open hands offering water to the city (Robert Graham, "Source Figure, 1992).

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    Biltmore Hotel

    by Dabs Updated Nov 5, 2006

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    Interior of the Biltmore Hotel
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    The Biltmore Hotel, now part of the Millennium Hotel chain, was built in 1923 and at the time was the largest hotel west of Chicago. It's thought that the name came from Cornelius Vanderbilt whose family estate in North Carolina bears the same name (well worth a visit should you happen to be in North Carolina, one of the finest estates in the US).

    Even if you are not staying at the Biltmore Hotel, you should take a walk through the ornate lobby if you find yourself in downtown LA, it reminds me a bit of the Palmer House in Chicago, another grand dame hotel built in the 1920s. Both are designed in the Beaux Arts style, the Biltmore was designed by Schultze and Weaver who also designed the Subway Terminal Building a couple of blocks away.

    If you look carefully at the Biltmore, you can see a difference in the bricks on part of the building, when they added on they couldn't find all of the different colors of bricks so they made do with one less color.

    Located at 506 South Grand Avenue

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