Little Ethiopia, Los Angeles

2 Reviews

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  • Little Ethiopia store, Los Angeles, CA
    Little Ethiopia store, Los Angeles, CA
    by marinarena
  • Little Ethiopia restaurant, Los Angeles, CA
    Little Ethiopia restaurant, Los Angeles,...
    by marinarena
  • Ethiopian market, Los Angeles, CA
    Ethiopian market, Los Angeles, CA
    by marinarena
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    Discover a taste of Little Ethiopia

    by marinarena Written Nov 9, 2012
    Little Ethiopia restaurant, Addis, L.A.
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    "Little" towns are a plenty within Los Angeles. One of the most tiny ones is Little Ethiopia (beginning from the early 1990s), situated in the exciting Mid-city/Westside area of the city, along a small stretch of Fairfax Ave. Though lacking the ancient and ultra-desert topography, one will come across generations of Ethiopian people gathering together, speaking Amharic and other native tongues along with English.

    Small enough of an area to discover by foot, discover Little Ethiopia with your eyes and mouth, as there are about a dozen of restaurants from which to try. Walk along South Fairfax (SoFax) between Olympic Blvd and Whitworth Dr.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

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  • Phalaenopsis03's Profile Photo

    Little Ethiopia in L.A.

    by Phalaenopsis03 Updated Jul 8, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    JenT and I @ Merkato Resto and Market (6/06)
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    So you're always being directed to visit Chinatown or Little Tokyo or Little Italy, etc. (well, L.A. doesn't really have a Little Italy), but ever hear of going to Little Ethiopia? In much the same way that L.A. has welcomed the Mexican, the Chinese, the Filipino, the Korean, and every other nationality under the sun (hooray for multiculturalism!), the Ethiopian community too is weaved into this multicolored tapestry, making their presence known in the stretch of Fairfax Ave known as Little Ethiopia. Interestingly, Ethiopians in L.A. comprise of the second largest Ethiopian political exile group in the country as a result of the political turmoil their homeland experienced in the 70's.

    Once primarily filled with Jewish businesses, today the area is officially an Ethiopian enclave. There's a street sign to prove it too. Since the commercial area itself is pretty small, I'd suggest coming here for lunch or dinner before or after you've visited any one of the museums on Miracle Mile. A couple of restaurant suggestions include Merkato and Nyala, both serving really yummy Ethiopian cuisine.

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