Unique Places in Los Angeles

  • Hollywood Bowl & Museum
    Hollywood Bowl & Museum
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Hollywood Bowl & Museum
    Hollywood Bowl & Museum
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Hollywood Bowl & Museum
    Hollywood Bowl & Museum
    by Jim_Eliason

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Los Angeles

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    Fairfax Community Mural

    by Yaqui Updated Mar 15, 2014

    This beautiful mural is by Artist Art Mortimer depicting life within the Jewish community. The paintings are taken from real photographs.

    First Panel (at left), the Beginnings, 1860s : The first synagogue and first rabbi in Los Angeles, and early Jewish business and prominenet Jewish family in Los Angeles.
    Second Panel, late 19th Century: A Los Angeles street scene showing a Jewish business, prominent banker of the era, a Jewish family’s barrel-making business and a home for tuberculosis patients that later evolved into what is now Cedars Sinai Hospital and the first Jewish sheriff of Los Angeles.
    Third Panel, early 20th Century:
    Actors in a truck to travel to location for filming of the first full-length movie made in Hollywood: “Squaw Man,” made by the Jesse Lasky Feature Play Company. The director, Cecil B. DeMille, is seated on the fender at left.
    Children receiving instruction in one of the first Hebrew schools in Los Angeles and home of one of the first Jewish families to live in Boyle Heights and Al Jolson as a rabbi in ‘The Jazz Singer’.
    Fourth Panel, 1930s: Canter’s Delicatessen’s original location in Boyle Heights, Albert Einstein and a local rabbi with their bicycles in Los Angeles, An elaborate Jewish wedding of the period, Garment worker’s protest in downtown Los Angeles, Los Angeles newspaper article describing a meeting of Jews to protest Hitler’s activities in Europe and Jewish woman who won a gold medal at the 1932 Olympics held in Los Angeles.
    Fifth Panel, 1940s: A school bus and students at a Jewish school in Los Angeles, a Los Angeles women’s group’s Clothing Campaign to assist war sufferers in Europe, a cutout billboard by the United Jewish Welfare Fund on Wilshire Blvd. proclaiming that Jews must live in freedom, the father of one of the organizers of the mural project, who served in the U.S. Navy in World War II and a group of Hadassah women boarding a train in L.A. to take them to a Hadassah conference in Sacramento.
    Sixth Panel, 1960s: A Jewish Youth group parading in front of nearby Fairfax High School affirming their support for the peace movement, a program in the Hollywood Bowl to raise money to help Israel during the Six Day War, the first woman rabbi in Los Angeles, a synagogue on the beachfront in Venice, at that time home to a large Jewish community, Sandy Koufax, pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers.
    Seventh Panel, Fairfax today, 1985, on right: A view of Fairfax Avenue near the mural, looking north toward the Hollywood Hills, a view of the mural in progress, showing scaffolding and workers painting the mural, two orthodox Jewish men shaking hands while shopping on Fairfax, Women selecting produce at a market on Fairfax and local residents at a bus stop on Fairfax.

    Located on Fairfax and oakwood, Los Angeles, CA 90036

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • marinarena's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    Seek out " Hidden" Cultural Town: Artesia(LA co)

    by marinarena Updated Jul 5, 2013

    Here is a little city of a Spanish-Italian name, with a heavily Portuguese influenced background, a mostly Korean & Latino population that is known as Little India- What? Come again? The town is Artesia, one of the smallest cities in LA county with about 16,000 residents. Though she is relatively far from the beach, looks rather mundane and is not on the main tourist map, there is interest here to grab a certain visitor's attention here.

    What keeps little Artesia on the map is the stretch of Pioneer Blvd which has several dozen East Indian shops. The suburb, about 20 miles southwest of LA, is informally known as Little India. If you want to buy a sari, eat authentic curry, buy gold jewelry or check out Bollywood stuff, you ought to make the trip here.

    Though Artesia can be considered "Little India", some could argue that it be also "Little Portugal"- at least in spirit. The town used to have a good number hailing from Portugal. However, these days, ethnic ties to the country are declined with a few percent of the population of Portuguese heritage. Still, there are signs of the Iberian country's influence-mainly at Portguese Hall which has been host to bull fights and different luso-inspired ceremonies.

    Artesia is yet another diverse LA suburb with several ethnicities in one. Mainly, there are those with Asian (especially Korean), but also Latino heritage. Notably, a large number of Filipino are shaped in the population, as well as those with Non-Portuguese Eurpoean ancestry & others.

    Notably, the East West Ice Arena, owned by Olympic darling Michelle Kwan is a landmark here. Artesia is close to a much more attractive town, Cerritos, and also not too far away from the non-coastal part of Long Beach.

    Notes: The locals pronounce the town "OUR-TEASE-SHA", though one can get away also with the basic Spanish way, "Ar-TEH-Sea-A".

    Artesia is easily accessible by freeway, of the 5 and 91. The MTA bus passes through the town each day, coming from downtown LA--Pershing Square. Catch MTA 62 (Hawaiian Gardens).

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • DueSer's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    L.A.'s Ghost Town

    by DueSer Updated Mar 6, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you've ever flown out of LAX airport and looked out the window of the plane right after take off, you may have noticed a patch of land between the airport and the ocean that looks like a small town. Well, that's exactly what it WAS. It isn't any longer, I'm afraid, but visiting it makes for a pleasant side trip from the beach, especially if you appreciate quirky historical stories.
    The name of this town was Surfridge and in the 1920s it sprang up rather quickly. Very nice homes went up along the coast, streets and lampposts went in and everyone was happy - until that little airport behind Surfridge started growing and becoming more popular. After less than a generation, with Los Angeles International Airport thriving, it became clear that this was no place anyone could comfortably live and the entire town was abandoned.
    There is a fence around the 48-acre plot of land now but you can still see in - roads cracked and filled with weeds looping around on themselves, foundations of some of those fancy houses, lampposts (most of the lamps themselves have long since shattered), and even, in a few spots, some steps leading nowhere.
    What is nice about this otherwise sad story is that the fence is keeping people out, which means the area is now filled with wildlife. It is gradually being turned into a nature preserve to try to resuscitate the El Segundo Blue Butterfly but those purple lupines, yellow daisies, grasslands, and palm trees that all sway gently in the ocean breezes are also home to a wide array of birds, including herons, gophers that run around playing with each other, and even, if you're lucky to see one, foxes.
    There is a walking trail that leads along the northern edge of this land and there are sidewalks along the other three sides. The best views are from the northern and western sides as you get the coastal views from there as well. It's near Dockweiler State Beach so you can park there for a small fee and spend the whole day if you want but if you don't, you can park for free along Vista Del Mar (on the west) or Napoleon (on the north).

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Birdwatching

    Was this review helpful?

  • marinarena's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    Discover Little Lithuania

    by marinarena Written Nov 20, 2012

    One of the newest and lesser known "Little" ethnic towns of Los Angeles is Little Lithuania. Within the enclave of Los Feliz is the ethnically designated area within a significant number of Lithuanian born and second generation Americans of Lithuanian decent. Los Angeles is a big sister city to the beautiful riverfront city of Kaunas. Unlike the bigs of Little towns, Little Lithuania does not have many obvious landmarks like neighboring Little Thai Town's colorful, ornate temples and storefronts. However, LL has a key center in St Casimir Church, the only church with a dedication service in the Lithuanian language. Come to LL in October for the premier Lithuania festival to see a "Lithuence" of ethnic costume display, dance, food and drink. The annual event, occuring since 2009 is held at the church. See past fair celebration byclicking the link.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Casino and Gambling
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • marinarena's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    Check out Chic Hipster Los Feliz!

    by marinarena Updated Nov 19, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    OK hipsters- here is your modern-day bohemian paradise- Los Feliz. Locally, it is pronounced "Los- FEE lez" but if you are a native Spanish speaker, you would be inclined to say, "Los fay-LEEZ". This hilly, Hollyweird- adjacent enclave meets the urbanite standard of eclectic ambiance with its many out-of-the-norm boutiques, cafes and dive bars. Many creative types of Hollywood are drawn to the affluent neighborhood. Notably, Madonna had a house here. Other notable Los Feliz residents include the blockbuster Twilight duo Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart.

    When in Los Feliz, look up and appreciate lovely views of Griffith Park, shop at ecletic, independent shops, eat at charming-chic eateries, and hang out at cool dive bars. The area is in a sweet (but traffic congested) spot, off the famous streets of boulevards Sunset and Hollywood.
    Be forewarned! Pack your patience on the road.

    If by pub trans., Los Feliz is reachable of the subway (Red Line Sunset/Vermont), several Metro buses, including the 180, and DASH Los Feliz.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Food and Dining
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • marinarena's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    Enter Chic Valley Territory: Studio City

    by marinarena Updated May 12, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Studio City is home to many struggling actors and other wanna-bes, talented and otherwise, who want their break in the entertainment industry but also established upple middle+ class families looking for more tranquil, dare I say "normal" parts of Los Angeles. Next door to Universal Studios, S.C. is the gateway of traveling along famed Ventura Blvd. Come here to choose from a great variety of dining and shopping options.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Singles

    Was this review helpful?

  • gilescorey's Profile Photo

    A Tiny Village in the midst of LA

    by gilescorey Written Dec 16, 2011

    Larchmont Village is an interesting little Los Angeles neighborhood that lies hidden between the leafy, mansion lined lanes of Hancock Park and the chaos of nearby Koreatown.

    It's main street is tough to find(Larchmont Blvd) as it's a dead end on both ends. But, enter from Beverly and you're smack dab in "Main Street America". More Mid West than SoCal, the Village has pharmacies, sandwich shops, pizzerias and a bustling street scene that is difficult to find in LA.

    And, although it's a fairly wealthy district of Los Angeles, it has an everyman air that belies the expensive real estate.

    Try one of the famous sandwiches at the Larchmont Village Wine, Spirits & Cheese ... just be prepared to wait in line, as they've become local legends.

    Village Pizzeria is quite good, as well; often considered among the best in the whole city. Pity they serve their pies with a huge helping of attitude.....

    But, minus that Larchmont is an oasis in the midst of Los Angeles, and a nice spot to park that d*mned car and stretch your legs on a sunny afternoon.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • marinarena's Profile Photo

    Stay in a key in-between city: Norwalk (L.A. co)

    by marinarena Updated Oct 28, 2011

    Norwalk

    Though not the most ideal place judging from appearances only, Norwalk is a consideration for a stay in the Los Angeles area.

    4 reasons to consider staying in Norwalk:

    She is ...
    about equidistant to LA(downtown) and Disneyland area.
    connected to multiple freeway and major highways (5, 105, 605 fwys, Imperial Hwy)

    She has...
    a Metrolink stop (shared with Santa Fe Springs) for easily connecting to downtown LA (30 min travel+-) and Anaheim/Orange (20 -25 min+-)

    a Metro Green Line rail station, enabling passengers to go conveniently to LAX.
    major hotels right off the freeway. (30 min to LAX by rail+-)

    True, true, there are some parts of the city that are badly unkept. Don't expect to see pretty sidewalks and buildings (Try to head to nearby Whitter and Cerritos for this). She is regular blah town, U.S.A- well, unless one considers a few things: Norwalk is deemed essential to one Arnold Schwartzenegger. Here is home to the main LA Registrar of Voters office. So important is the registrar building along Imperial Hwy, that Arnold came here to rally for support to during his campaign to be governor of California a few years back.

    There is not much excitement here but it's not a ghost town by any means. For things to do- there is the nice town center with fun at the movies (AMC 20 theater) and decent eateries for dining. These are located in the main and most attractive part of the town.

    Norwalk has a particularly Latino feel and makeup, and is very convenient for Spanish speakers. However, there is some ethnic diversity.

    Overall, marked Norwalk on your city list to stay for an LA/D-Land adventure!

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Business Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • GracesTrips's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    Largest Art Colony in the World

    by GracesTrips Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    That's what they claim! The Brewery Art Colony. Located at the former Pabst Blue Ribbon Brewery. Most of the buildings seem to have remained and are rented and leased out as living space and galleries. This is quite an amazing place. Twice a year they hold a the Brewery Art Walk. It's a free event with free parking. Kind of like an open house. Please see my album posted on my LA travel page for more pics. Not sure if the art colony is accessible at other times of the year so you should call first to get info.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Edla's Profile Photo
    2 more images

    Wanna be deep?

    by Edla Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Visit Lake Shrine. This is a Self Realization Fellowship. In short, these are meditation gardens. I found them absolutely BEAUTIFUL. You can feed the ducks and fish or you could just sit somewhere and read or pray or take a nap :)

    Address:
    17190 Sunset Boulevard
    Pacific Palisades, California

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Seniors

    Was this review helpful?

  • 4 more images

    San Dimas Western Days Rodeo (annual event)

    by Phalaenopsis03 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A longstanding American Western tradition, the rodeo is alive and kicking in the city of San Dimas. For the 12th year in a row, the city hosted its weekend long (10/7/06 and 10/8/06) San Dimas Western Days Rodeo, a PRCA (Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association) prorodeo sanctioned event. As I'd never been to the rodeo before in my life, I was very much interested in seeing what this cowboy culture phenomenon was all about and did so with my colleague and her family.

    It was fascinating to see all the sexy cowboys in their cute cowboy hats, boots, tight jeans, chaps, and spurs riding about on their big horseys. But I have to say, it was difficult for me to stomach seeing those poor and defenseless calves being roped by their necks, yanked to the dirt, and their legs tied together. I mean, what does that really prove? On the open range - acceptable, but for pure entertainment? Just doesn't seem right somehow. But anyway, what was neat to watch were the macho cowboys bull riding and saddle bronc riding. Now that's a true test of athleticism and stamina. Yeehaw!!!

    A full day's schedule at the rodeo included bareback riding, tie-down roping, steer wrestling, saddle bronc riding, bull riding, team roping, barrel racing (for cowgirls), etc., plus entertainment, i.e., skydivers and the rodeo clown. For children with special needs, they offered the Challenged “Buckaroos” Rodeo on the second day. The cost was $15.00 for adults and $8.00 for kids.

    Location: The Tex Shoemaker Arena in Horsethief Canyon Park on San Dimas Canyon Rd., north of Foothill Blvd.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Dabs's Profile Photo
    3 more images

    Hollyhock House/Barnsdall Park

    by Dabs Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I think of Frank Lloyd Wright as being a midwestern architect, he was born in Wisconsin and started his career in Chicago working for Adler & (Louis) Sullivan. After being fired from Adler & Sullivan, he opened his own office in Oak Park, Illinois and designed around 50 houses in that area, many of them in the Prairie style for which he would become famous. But he also was commissioned for work outside the midwest, a couple of his more famous works are Fallingwater in Pennsylvania and the Guggenheim Museum in New York City.

    Ironically, Wright's use of large open interior spaces and lots of windows is more suited to warmer climates, one of the things I've always found odd about the Robie House in Chicago is that during the winter months, the living areas would be extremely cold and uncomfortable. The Hollyhock House was his first commission in Los Angeles, built between 1919-1923 for philanthropist Aline Barnsdall who donated it to the city of Los Angeles in 1927 to be used as a park and arts center. It does not appear on the lists of his most famous designs but if you find yourself driving through this section of Hollywood, it's worth a stop to take a look at the exterior of the house and for the panoramic view of Hollywood from Barnsdall Park which is located on the top of a hill.

    There are public tours of the interior but I didn't have time, besides it looked like there was renovation going on in the interior. If you do go on the tour, be sure to look out for the use of the hollyhock in the design and furnishings, it was Aline Barnsdall's favorite flower.

    4800 Hollywood Boulevard, near Vermont Avenue

    Was this review helpful?

  • marinarena's Profile Photo

    See Little Westchester

    by marinarena Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Many have passed through the town of Westchester on their way out of the LAX area. The thing is - not many stop here. Perhaps this is a good thing, especially to locals here. LA does not need another crowded, ballyhooed tourist stop. Though very small it is distinct enough to seperate and mention it. This area is not a bad area to avoid, in fact, a visitor may look here to stay for modest accomodations.

    She has roots in the aerospace industry. Aviator Howard Hughes built the Spuce Goose here in the early 1900s. As a relative quiet area (though one may wonder how can an LAX adjacent area be so), Westchester enjoys a good share of peace though it is within the wild city of Angels. There is a bit of a funky chic side to her with some unique classic shops located along Manchester and Sepulveda Blvd. Nearby Westechester is an excellent private college, Loyola Marymount and Playa Del Rey.

    Pics are to come from here. Westchester should get some more visual justice!!

    Related to:
    • Study Abroad
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Agraichen's Profile Photo

    Forest Lawn Memorial Park

    by Agraichen Updated Apr 4, 2011

    Forest Lawn Memorial Park is more than just a "last resting place" for famous and not so famous people. It is an outdoor museum of sorts with significant artifacts of American history.

    The "Hall of Liberty museum is a tribute to those that created the US, made it a great nation and have helped protect it since colonial days.

    The Gardens of Heritage contain a statue of George Washington that for many years stood in a park in my home town of Methuen, MA. In the early days, there were links from the chain Washington used across the Delaware River in an attempt to block the Britich from invading.

    Just across the street from the statue is a full size replica of the Old North Church, the location that Paul Revere received his famous "orders" to warn of the British invasion.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Community Garden

    by Phalaenopsis03 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Located in South LA on Alameda and 41st St, the 14-acre Community Garden is threatened to be closed down. This garden supplies food to approximately 300-predominately low-income gardeners and their families.

    This is no ordinary garden. For the past 10 years many local residents have thrived on this land. Let's help save their garden; their lifeblood. Visit their website to learn more.

    Was this review helpful?

Los Angeles Hotels

See all 196 Hotels in Los Angeles

Latest Los Angeles Hotel Reviews

Hampton Inn Los Angeles International Airport
218 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 18, 2014
Howard Johnson Hotel Los Angeles International Airport
354 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 12, 2014
Holiday Inn City Center Hotel
328 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 14, 2014
Holiday Inn Express Hotel & Suites Los Angeles-Silverlake
68 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 3, 2014
Quality Inn Mid Wilshire Plaza
83 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 17, 2014
Kyoto Grand Hotel and Gardens Los Angeles
742 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 19, 2014
Clarion Hotel Downtown Los Angeles
67 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 18, 2014
Comfort Inn - Los Angeles / West 7th Street
106 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 15, 2014
Days Inn Los Angeles Mid Wilshire
147 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Mar 27, 2014
Econolodge Inn And Suites West Hollywood
51 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 18, 2014
Hollywood Orchid Suites
935 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 19, 2014
Sheraton Gateway At Lax
1770 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 18, 2014
Holiday Inn Express Los Angeles Universal City Cahuenga
145 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 9, 2014
SUPER 8 MOTEL - LOS ANGELES/CULVER CITY AREA
99 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Mar 23, 2014
Royal Century Hotel, Dai-Ichi
37 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Mar 18, 2014

Instant Answers: Los Angeles

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

93 travelers online now

Comments

Los Angeles Off The Beaten Path

Travel tips and advice posted by real travelers and Los Angeles locals.
Map of Los Angeles

Los Angeles Members Meetings

Aug 15, 2014 
Celebrate VT's 15th Anniversary
Aug 15, 2014 
VT's 15th Anniversary - The TMZ Hollywood Tour
Aug 16, 2014 
VT's 15th Anniversary - Downtown Exploration
Aug 16, 2014 
VT's 15th Anniversary - Second Dinner

see all Los Angeles member meetings