Stanley Mosk Courthouse, Los Angeles

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  • Stanley Mosk Courthouse
    by Yaqui
  • Stanley Mosk Courthouse
    by Yaqui
  • Stanley Mosk Courthouse
    by Yaqui
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    LA Superior Court Stanley Mosk Courthouse #2

    by Yaqui Written Jan 18, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Located at the other entrance of the Los Angeles Superior Court Stanley Mosk Courthouse sculpted by Albert Stewart above the entrance on Grand Ave are three sculptures called the "Foundations of the Law". Each represents Mosaic Law, left, with Moses standing over a broken calf (the Judeo-Christian heritage); the Magna Carta, center, with a 13th century knight standing above a castle (English Common Law), and the Declaration of Independence, right, with Thomas Jefferson standing over a ship.

    Located at 111 N. Hill Street Los Angeles, CA 90012

    Declaration of Independence Magna Carta Mosaic Law
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    Los Angeles Superior Stanley Mosk Courthouse

    by Yaqui Written Jan 18, 2010

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    This courthouse is names after a Stanley Mosk who served for 37 years as an Associate Justice of the California Supreme Court. What caught my eye the most is upbove one the entrance is the sculpture of "Justice" a robed Justice is the allegorical story of the battle of Good Versus Evil. Her posture is defiant, as if ready to do battle against evil and to protect the forces of good with her great sword. The sword remains sheathed, but her hand rests atop the hilt. This was sculpted by Donal Hord.

    Located on 111 North Hill Street Los Angeles, Ca. 90012

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    Los Angeles United States Court House 1940

    by Yaqui Written Jan 17, 2010

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    When we headed south from Olvera Street, you actually come upon this building first and city hall is right next to it. It was designed by Gilbert Stanley Underwood and Louis A. Simon in 1940. It purpose is to house the adminstration and central court services for the county of Los Angeles. My hubby had the chance to service jury duty here. He said it was fascinating to see how our judicial service works. This building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places #80004629

    312 N. Spring Street
    Los Angeles, CA 90012

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