La Brea Tar Pits - Page Museum, Los Angeles

4.5 out of 5 stars 31 Reviews

5801 Wilshire Blvd.

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  • La Brea Tar Pits - Page Museum
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  • La Brea Tar Pits - Page Museum
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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    La Brea tar pits

    by Dabs Updated Oct 28, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    La Brea tarpits
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    I was heading to LACMA and since the La Brea tar pits are right next door, I swung by before heading inside. You can park in the same lot for both for a flat fee of $6.

    In a scene that always brings a tear to my eye, in the corner of the main tar pit, a life size model of a mamma mammoth stuck in the gooey tar bellows out to the daddy and baby mammoth on the shore, a recreation of what must have happened over and over again based on the large quantity of Ice Age fossils that had been excavted here, over 100 tons of fossils to date. There's also a mastadon model on the other end of the pit.

    On the surface of the water you can see oil slicks that smell like asphalt and bubbles of natural methane gas. The La Brea tar pits are free to visit, if you want to see the museum there is an extra charge.

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  • Fewf's Profile Photo

    La Brea Tar Pits

    by Fewf Written Sep 28, 2006
    Columbian Mammoth
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    Tens of thousands of years ago (much more recently than dinosaurs, which went extinct some 160 million years ago), animals got trapped in oil seeping up from the ground. As crude oil sits around, its lighter components evaporate and it becomes extremely sticky and difficult to extricate oneself from (i.e. tar). As even more evaporates, it becomes a hard black substance (i.e. asphalt). The animals would get stuck and die, and then their bones would be quickly covered up with asphalt and thus very well preserved. You can still see the La Brea tar pits (they're enclosed by fences now), and if you go to the nearby Page Museum, you can see skeletons that have been retrieved.

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  • SFHulaGIrl's Profile Photo

    George C. Page Museum

    by SFHulaGIrl Written May 17, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    The George C. Page Museum is a part of the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits. This small museum has interactive exhibits. Through its windows, you can watch bones being repaired and cleaned.

    Open Monday through Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
    Saturday, Sunday & Holidays: 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
    FREE ADMISSION on the first Tuesday of each month.
    Closed: Independence Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas & New Year's.

    Admission Prices:

    Adults: $7.00
    Seniors (62 & over) and students with I.D.: $4.50
    Youths 13-17: $4.50
    Children 5-12: $2.00
    Members & Children Under 5: FREE

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  • SFHulaGIrl's Profile Photo

    La Brea Tar Pits

    by SFHulaGIrl Written May 17, 2006

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    These tar pits contain vertebrae of at least 59 species of mammals and more than 135 species of birds. For thousands of years, tar from these pits was used as glue and waterproof caulking for baskets & canoes by American Indians. After Westerners arrived, the tar was mined and used as roofing.

    It's free to wander the grounds.

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  • AKtravelers's Profile Photo

    Stop by the La Brea Tarpits

    by AKtravelers Written Apr 24, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Andrea examines a mammoth skeleton at the Page

    If you are interested in prehistoric life, Los Angeles' La Brea tarpits will make an interesting visit. The tarpits themselves are still extant, with smelly methane bubbling up from below the surface. And in the adjacent George C. Page Museum, you can view the remains of some of the animals that were reclaimed from them (for a small fee, of course). Before you go in, you should understand that the fossils are of mammals, NOT DINOSAURS. The tarpits formed about 40,000 years ago -- well after dinosaurs went extinct but not too late to capture such extinct mammals as mammoths, saber tooth cats and a whole variety of large fauna. Most of the large mammals started disappearing around 10,000 years ago (a time coinciding with the arrival of humans in North America -- if you are interested as to why these extinctions would be so abrupt, we recommend reading Jared Diamond's "The Third Chimpanzee").

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  • Independent_Traveler's Profile Photo

    La Brea Tar Pits or Page Museum

    by Independent_Traveler Updated Apr 14, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    LA BREA TAR PITS - mammoths, sabre tooth tigers, sloths, and other bones dug up from the same area where the museum stands. Pit 91, in the summer time, is open for digging (by the paleontologists, but we are allowed to watch). There is a laboratory inside the museum, where visitors can see the cleaning of the ice age bones. Monday through Friday, 9:30 am to 5:00 pm
    - Saturday, Sunday & Holidays, 10:00 am to 5:00 pm. $7 admission fee, discounts to students and seniors.

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  • american_tourister's Profile Photo

    Page Museum - La Brea Tar Pits

    by american_tourister Written Jan 26, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Help!

    The Page Museum is located at the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits in the heart of Los Angeles. Rancho La Brea is one of the world’s most famous fossil localities, recognized for having the largest and most diverse assemblage of extinct Ice Age plants and animals in the world. Visitors can learn about Los Angeles as it was between 10,000 and 40,000 years ago, during the last Ice Age, when animals such as saber-toothed cats and mammoths roamed the Los Angeles Basin. Through windows at the Page Museum Laboratory, visitors can watch bones being cleaned and repaired. Outside the Museum, in Hancock Park, life-size replicas of several extinct mammals are featured.

    "From the Page Museum website"

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  • MatthewMetcalfe's Profile Photo

    LaBrea Tar Pits - Very Interesting!

    by MatthewMetcalfe Written Oct 2, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Saber Toothed Cat

    Since I was young, I've always heard stories of the La Brea Tar pits. Over thousands of years, the Pits have swallowed up animals that weren't wise enough to go around them.

    It is incredible the amount of fossils they've pulled from the pits. They aren't all Saber Toothed Cats either. There are hundreds of animals with the Dire Wolves being the most Popular.

    Walking by the pits is like walking by a road crew. You can smell the tar. There's not much to look at in the pits. The good stuff has been excavated and is housed in the George Page Museum next to the Pits.

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  • kdoc13's Profile Photo

    La Brea Tar Pits

    by kdoc13 Written Sep 10, 2004

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    Tar, not just for roadways anymore!

    Slowly oozing its way beneath Los Angeles, the city that itself oozes (that may just be Hollywood though), are the La Brea Tar Pits. The pits, no relation to Brad Pitt, are the home to literally thousands of fossils waiting to be found.

    The finding of these fossils are one of the main reasons to check out the pits. Every day there ae workers excavating and cleaning the bones of saber-toothed tigers and Mamoths that got stuck in the tar over 40,000 years ago.

    The museum itself tells the story of the animals that once got trapped in the tar, and there are many exhibit featuring replicas of the now extinct ex-creatures. It is geared very much to the kiddies, but for the adults there are Monty Python fans among the tour guides who are happy to do a take on the Dead Parrot sketch, with the fossils. Ok, I made that last part up. It really is geared towards the kiddies, and adults who think like kids though.

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  • cosmogypsy's Profile Photo

    Watch an excavation at pit 91

    by cosmogypsy Written Aug 5, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    excavation site (Pit 91)

    The La Brea Tar Pits are really worth the trip. Right away, you will see the tar or asphalt. I was told it isn't tar but asphalt. There is a part surrounding the museum and pits that is very nice.

    Walking through the park, you arrive at pit 91 where Wednesday through Sunday 10am-4pm you can watch them excavate bones from animals such as the Saber-toothed tiger.

    I found it exciting and I am sure young children would as well. Inside the Page Museum you can see the bones assembled and learn more about being a Paleontologist. You can also watch paleontologist at work assembling the bones that have been found.

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  • cheap_tourist's Profile Photo

    La Brea Tar Pits

    by cheap_tourist Updated Jun 12, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Statue of Trapped Mammoth in a Tar Pit

    For ages, the La Brea Tar Pits have entombed many animals that were not able to escape its sticky grasp. A statue of a stricken mammoth calling out to its helpless family (see picture) illustrates the tar pits' role in natural selection.

    Scientists were able to recover the bones of many animals that died in the tar pits. Many, like mammoths, mastodons, ground sloths, and sabertoothed cats, are already extinct. Skeletons of these ancient animals are on display at the nearby Page Museum.

    You can see the tar pits for free. Adult admission price at the Page Museum is $7, however. If you go there on the first Tuesday of the month, you get to enter the museum for free.

    The Los Angeles County Museum of Arts (LACMA) is adjacent to the tar pits. You may want to check it out, too.

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  • Erin74's Profile Photo

    The La Brea Tar Pits

    by Erin74 Updated May 7, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The La Brea Tar Pits

    The La Brea Tar Pits are a unique L.A. sight that's worth checking out while you're in town. Situated right next to the L.A. County Musuem of Art, in the heart of the Miracle Mile area, the Tar Pits are made up of the actual tar pits themselves and wonderful museum (Page Museum) which highlights the history of the site.

    During the last Ice Age, huge mammoths, sabertoothed lions and giant ground sloths became trapped and entombed in the tar that has been seeping out of the ground in this area for the past 40,000 years. You can see their fossilized remains at the site, as well as the bubbling pit of tar that is still located here.

    In the park next to the tar pits, life-size replicas of several extinct mammals are featured. The tar does smell, although it's not terrible. A funny fact about the area... the tar is not just in the tar pit next to the museum. From time to time it bubbles up in the front yards of the lovely homes that surround Miracle Mile area. Some good friends of mine have a mini-tar pit in their flower garden that they're not too happy about...

    Hours:
    Monday - Friday, 9:30 am to 5:00 pm
    Saturday, Sunday & Holidays, 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

    Admission is free on the first Tuesday of each month.

    Cost:
    Adults: $7.00
    Seniors 62 and older and Students with I.D.: $4.50
    Children 5-12 years old: $2.00

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  • cruisingbug's Profile Photo

    Watch Your Step at the Tar Pits!

    by cruisingbug Written Dec 20, 2003
    Wolf Skulls at the Page Museum, L.A.

    The La Brea tar pits are just what they sound like - pools of stinky tar in the middle of L.A., with statues of mammoths in various stages of sinking into the tar.
    However, on the grounds of the tar pits, the Page Museum offers an interesting look at what has been reclaimed from the tar pits, including this collection of wolf skulls. Excavation of the pits is still in progress - you can walk outside to an excavation area for a first hand look. Don't stray from the paths, though, or you might end up being the next thing they pull from the muck!

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  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Captain G. Allan Hancock Marker

    by Yaqui Written Mar 10, 2013

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    It reads:
    Captain G. Allan Hancock
    Donor of Hancock Park
    to the people of Los Angeles County
    1916
    Placed June 13, 1963

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Page Museum

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Feb 25, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Page Museum
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    Located next to the LA Brea Tarpits, this museum houses the collection of fossil recovered from the pits.

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