La Brea Tar Pits - Page Museum, Los Angeles

4.5 out of 5 stars 32 Reviews

5801 Wilshire Blvd. +1 213-763-3499

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  • La Brea Tar Pits - Page Museum
    by Yaqui
  • Sorting Microfossils.
    Sorting Microfossils.
    by lmkluque
  • Methane Gas Escaping from the Tar
    Methane Gas Escaping from the Tar
    by lmkluque
  • AKtravelers's Profile Photo

    Stop by the La Brea Tarpits

    by AKtravelers Written Apr 24, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you are interested in prehistoric life, Los Angeles' La Brea tarpits will make an interesting visit. The tarpits themselves are still extant, with smelly methane bubbling up from below the surface. And in the adjacent George C. Page Museum, you can view the remains of some of the animals that were reclaimed from them (for a small fee, of course). Before you go in, you should understand that the fossils are of mammals, NOT DINOSAURS. The tarpits formed about 40,000 years ago -- well after dinosaurs went extinct but not too late to capture such extinct mammals as mammoths, saber tooth cats and a whole variety of large fauna. Most of the large mammals started disappearing around 10,000 years ago (a time coinciding with the arrival of humans in North America -- if you are interested as to why these extinctions would be so abrupt, we recommend reading Jared Diamond's "The Third Chimpanzee").

    Andrea examines a mammoth skeleton at the Page
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    Project 23~Page Museum

    by Yaqui Written Mar 10, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    New Discoveries at La Brea Tar Pits:
    The ground below your feet contains one of the richest deposits of fossils from the last part of the Ice Age, approximately 40,000 to 10,000 years ago. In 2006, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art began constructing an underground parking structure next to the park. This gave paleontologists at the Page Museum the opportunity to access areas that had been far below gournd level. During the construction, sixteen new areas of fossils deposits werre discovered. These were placed into twenty-three crates and moved to the spot in front of you. We are now excavating those new fossil deposits. The information on the other panels will tell you how we do this and why it is so important.

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    George C. Page Museum

    by SFHulaGIrl Written May 17, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The George C. Page Museum is a part of the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits. This small museum has interactive exhibits. Through its windows, you can watch bones being repaired and cleaned.

    Open Monday through Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
    Saturday, Sunday & Holidays: 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
    FREE ADMISSION on the first Tuesday of each month.
    Closed: Independence Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas & New Year's.

    Admission Prices:

    Adults: $7.00
    Seniors (62 & over) and students with I.D.: $4.50
    Youths 13-17: $4.50
    Children 5-12: $2.00
    Members & Children Under 5: FREE

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  • Independent_Traveler's Profile Photo

    La Brea Tar Pits or Page Museum

    by Independent_Traveler Updated Apr 14, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    LA BREA TAR PITS - mammoths, sabre tooth tigers, sloths, and other bones dug up from the same area where the museum stands. Pit 91, in the summer time, is open for digging (by the paleontologists, but we are allowed to watch). There is a laboratory inside the museum, where visitors can see the cleaning of the ice age bones. Monday through Friday, 9:30 am to 5:00 pm
    - Saturday, Sunday & Holidays, 10:00 am to 5:00 pm. $7 admission fee, discounts to students and seniors.

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  • MatthewMetcalfe's Profile Photo

    LaBrea Tar Pits - Very Interesting!

    by MatthewMetcalfe Written Oct 2, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Since I was young, I've always heard stories of the La Brea Tar pits. Over thousands of years, the Pits have swallowed up animals that weren't wise enough to go around them.

    It is incredible the amount of fossils they've pulled from the pits. They aren't all Saber Toothed Cats either. There are hundreds of animals with the Dire Wolves being the most Popular.

    Walking by the pits is like walking by a road crew. You can smell the tar. There's not much to look at in the pits. The good stuff has been excavated and is housed in the George Page Museum next to the Pits.

    Saber Toothed Cat
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  • WulfstanTraveller's Profile Photo

    La Brea Tar Pits & Page Museum

    by WulfstanTraveller Written Mar 30, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    On Wilshire Blvd, in the area of Los Angeles west of downtown and south of Hollywood, are the La Brea Tar Pits and Page Museum. The tar pits contain thousands of animal skeletons from the Pleistocene on, mostly to about 40,000-10,000 years ago. One can see open tar pits in the park and go to the museum, which contains numerous partial and complete skeletons taken from the tar pits. One can also go visit a pit which is currently being excavated. Visiting the park and the open, fenced-in pits is free, but one must pay to visit the museum and excavation pit. Skeletons found include huge numbers of dire wolves, plus sabre-tooth tigers, mastadons, bears, etc.

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  • apbeaches's Profile Photo

    La Brea Tar Pits

    by apbeaches Written Jul 16, 2008

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    La Brea Tar Pits are a famous cluster of tar pits located in Hancock Park in the urban heart of Los Angeles. Asphalt (colloquially termed tar, which in Spanish is termed brea, see below) has seeped up from the ground in this area for tens of thousands of years, forming hundreds of sticky pools that trapped animals and plants which happened to enter. Over time, the asphalt fossilized the remains. The result is an incredibly rich collection of fossils dating from the last ice age.

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  • american_tourister's Profile Photo

    Page Museum - La Brea Tar Pits

    by american_tourister Written Jan 26, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Page Museum is located at the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits in the heart of Los Angeles. Rancho La Brea is one of the world’s most famous fossil localities, recognized for having the largest and most diverse assemblage of extinct Ice Age plants and animals in the world. Visitors can learn about Los Angeles as it was between 10,000 and 40,000 years ago, during the last Ice Age, when animals such as saber-toothed cats and mammoths roamed the Los Angeles Basin. Through windows at the Page Museum Laboratory, visitors can watch bones being cleaned and repaired. Outside the Museum, in Hancock Park, life-size replicas of several extinct mammals are featured.

    "From the Page Museum website"

    Help!
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  • Cheap L.A. Activities

    by chinylaj Written Nov 20, 2008

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    The 1st Tuesday of the month means FREE admission to the La Brea Tar Pits(which is not just pits of tar-there are fossilized creatures from prehistoric times i.e. sabertooth tigers, woolly mammoths etc.) www.tarpits.org
    on the Miracle Mile on Wilshire and Museum Of Contemporary Art( also called MOCA which is next to the Tar Pits) www.moca.org

    As for Disnelyand, there are actually a few things you could do-

    2 days in Disneyland
    or
    1 day Disneyland and 1 day Disney's California Adventure
    or
    1 day Disneyland and 1 day Knott's Berry Farm(which is not a farm its a really cool amusement park( the 1st in america they claim) which locals go to more than Disney www.knotts.com

    Also, Downtown L.A. is not safe or interesting. Downtown Santa Monica or Santa Monica Pier or the 3rd Street Promenade will be much more entertaining thirdstreetpromenade.org/visitors/index.html
    www.santamonicapier.org

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    The best bit of downtown LA (for me).

    by leics Written Aug 8, 2013

    I really wanted to visit the La Brea Tar Pits..... and they didn't disappoint.

    I was lucky enough to be taken there by LA friends and so was able to spend a couple of hours exploring.

    The tar pits are really unusual, although not unique. Asphaltum (tar) seeps up to the surface via a fault above the underlying oil field and..in the past..the whole area was a huge tar 'marsh' with thick layers of sticky tar covered by leaves and/or water. Tar 'springs' burst to the surface, a mixture of tar and water which separated as it left the ground. Hundreds of thousands of animals became trapped and their fossilised remains have been excavated on the site for the past hundred years or so.

    There is a vast asphalt 'lake' at the entrance, but this gives a wrong impression of how the tar 'marsh' originally looked. It's actually an old asphaltum mine, with a top layer of water and methane bubbles continually rising to the surface and bursting. But it is fascinating nonetheless, with a most evocative smell of hot roads in childhood summers.

    The George C Page museum was built on site to house the fossils discovered, and to display just a few of them. It opened in 1977 and is a very well-presented museum indeed, with plenty to interest children. The skeleton of 'Zed', a mammoth, is perhaps the prize exhibit but I was most taken with the beautiful...and complete..bird skeletons on display.

    Modern scientific technology has allowed paleontologists to extract microfossils from the tar pits: seeds, tiny bones, pollen grains and insect parts.These add hugely to our knowledge of prehistoric times.

    You can see an excavation in the parkland surrounding the museum (pit 91) although work is in abeyance at the moment..the focus is on 'project 23', the excavation and examination of 23 huge containers of deposit rescued when the underground parking garage of the nearby LA County Art Museum was constructed in 2006, exposing 16 new fossil deposits. It is expected to take several more years to go through the deposits so ground excavations have been halted for the time being.

    Even if you are not especially interested in prehistory the La Brea Tar Pits are an absolute must , if only because you own't find an excavation like it anywhere else. And children will love the experience!

    Information, opening times and entrance on the official website below.

    Tar pit Museum entrance Giant sloth Skulls of dire wolves. Pit 91
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  • marinarena's Profile Photo

    Dig the Page, discover the life of the Pits!

    by marinarena Written Feb 2, 2013

    Before Wilshire Blvd and cement galore layered the central point of the Miracle Mile area in Los Angeles, the land was nothing but tar.

    The well-traveled La Brea Tar Pits features the museum which includes the Fishbowl Lab where paleontologists work in live time with the excavated digs discovered right in their backyard of the pits.

    Don't think of discovering dinosaurs at Page (so many of us do so fatally) but rather over a million ice age fossils of saber-tooth cats, wolves, horses, coyotes and yes, mammoths.

    Notes:

    Admission is $12 for adults, $9 children *
    Come in free at Page on the first Tuesday of the month, except in July and August*
    *May be subject to change.

    The Pit 91 station is outside the museum and free to walk in and explore.

    Personalized tours available.

    shot outside of Page Museum Page Museum, Los Angeles outside Page Museum, Los Angeles
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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    La Brea Tar Pits

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Feb 25, 2013

    This is the site of a tarpit in midtown LA where for eons animals have been captured as they tried to drink what they thought was water. It is one of the richest site of fossils of extinct animals in the US.

    La Brea Tar Pits La Brea Tar Pits La Brea Tar Pits
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  • Fewf's Profile Photo

    La Brea Tar Pits

    by Fewf Written Sep 28, 2006

    Tens of thousands of years ago (much more recently than dinosaurs, which went extinct some 160 million years ago), animals got trapped in oil seeping up from the ground. As crude oil sits around, its lighter components evaporate and it becomes extremely sticky and difficult to extricate oneself from (i.e. tar). As even more evaporates, it becomes a hard black substance (i.e. asphalt). The animals would get stuck and die, and then their bones would be quickly covered up with asphalt and thus very well preserved. You can still see the La Brea tar pits (they're enclosed by fences now), and if you go to the nearby Page Museum, you can see skeletons that have been retrieved.

    Columbian Mammoth Tooth Saber-Toothed Tiger Tar Pit with Demonstrative Sculpture Life-Size Ground Sloth Sculpture

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  • cruisingbug's Profile Photo

    Watch Your Step at the Tar Pits!

    by cruisingbug Written Dec 20, 2003

    The La Brea tar pits are just what they sound like - pools of stinky tar in the middle of L.A., with statues of mammoths in various stages of sinking into the tar.
    However, on the grounds of the tar pits, the Page Museum offers an interesting look at what has been reclaimed from the tar pits, including this collection of wolf skulls. Excavation of the pits is still in progress - you can walk outside to an excavation area for a first hand look. Don't stray from the paths, though, or you might end up being the next thing they pull from the muck!

    Wolf Skulls at the Page Museum, L.A.

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  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Captain G. Allan Hancock Marker

    by Yaqui Written Mar 10, 2013

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It reads:
    Captain G. Allan Hancock
    Donor of Hancock Park
    to the people of Los Angeles County
    1916
    Placed June 13, 1963

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