Olvera Street, Los Angeles

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    The Firehouse

    by malianrob Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The fire car was pulled by horses
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    This is now a museum featuring 19th century tools and equipment for putting out fires. This is the oldest Firehouse in Los Angeles. Admission is free and there is someone there that can answer whatever questions you may have.
    Fires used to be rare in LA in those times because most building were made from adode and if there were a fire neighbors would get together and put it out by forming a brigade and using the water at their disposal.
    The first fire dept was created by volunteers and the firehouse was constructed in May 1884, completes in August. The stables were inside for the horses that pulled the fire engine. The floor has a unique turntable in the floor that made it junnecessary to back the horses in or out.

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    The Sepulveda House

    by malianrob Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The front and first floor of the Sepulveda House
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    This is the only Eastlake Victorian Building on Olvera St. It was build in 1887 and is now a visitors center, gallery and exhibits atrifacts from that era.
    There is a Bedroon exhibit that used to be the main lady of the house's bedroom. There is also a kitchen exhibit.
    In all the times I have been to Olvera Street i had never noticed this building. I am really glad i saw it because in the visitors section you can get alot of useful info on LA.

    Admission is free and it is opened from 10am to 3pm Monday -Saturday

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    Mexican Village

    by draguza Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    El Pueblo
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    Olvera Street is in the oldest part of Los Angeles. Named for the first County Judge, Augustin Olvera, in 1877, it was converted to a colorful Mexican marketplace in 1930. There are twenty-seven historic buildings.

    Olvera Street is the birthplace of the City of Los Angeles, otherwise known as El Pueblo Historic Monument. The colorful village features 27 historic buildings with a traditional Mexican style plaza area. Wander around the marketplace and shop for souvenirs including handcrafted Mexican wares typical of old Mexico. There are also free docent tours by Las Angelitas.

    Stroll through this beautiful street and stop for the popular taquitos or tacos at the outdoor cafes. Olvera Street also offers a variety of traditional authentic Mexican cuisine, with delicious enchiladas, mole and other native dishes.

    On weekends you can enjoy outdoor entertainment by strolling bollero musicians, Mariachis music and performances by Aztec Indians and folkloric dancing.

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    Olvera Street in downtown LA

    by bruingirl Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The heart of LA - this is where it all began, back in 1781. This is where the original city was founded. Of course, back then, Los Angeles was actually El Pueblo de La Reina de Nuestra Senora de Los Angeles and was the capital of Alta Mexico, prior to becoming a state. It has definitely changed quite a bit since then, especially after the revitalization of this part of town in 1930 to become Olvera Street. Many of the historic buildings are still standing, including the oldest brick building in Los Angeles. This is a great place to walk around and enjoy the Mexican culture that it still celebrates. There are little shops everywhere and great restaurants! There is usually live music at the plaza and the air is just filled with this feeling of being in a simpler time where people are not caught up in rushing from place to place.

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    Olvera Street (Old Mexican Village)

    by sunnywong Updated Apr 4, 2011

    Olvera Street (El Pueblo De Los Angeles Historic Park). The oldest part of the City of Los Angeles otherwise known as the birthplace of the City of Angels or El Pueblo Historic Monument. Many Latinos often refer it as La Placita Olvera. It contains 27 historic buildings, a traditional Mexican style plaza area, where you can wander around, shop for souvenirs and handcrafted Mexican wares typical of old Mexico.

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    El pueblo de los angeles

    by mindcrime Written Feb 3, 2010

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    Avila Adobe
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    El pueblo de los angeles is actually like a theme park, on the area (covering 44 acters) where Los Angeles was founded back in 1781 by spanish. The Mexico took over the place (1822-1847). You can still see around here some of the oldest buildings in the city. The oldest one is the Avila Adobe(pic 1). It was built in 1818 by Don F. Avila, a wealthy ranchero. There’s no entrance fee so if you pass by from 9.00 to 16.00 take a look, you will travel back in time for a while. At 845 N.Alameda street you can visit the Sepulveda House. It was built in 1887 in Victorian style with 22 rooms. In our days it houses a small museum about the history of El Pueblo and also is a Visitors Center.

    Most of the tourists come here for the Olvera street(pic 2), a tourist trap probably but funny enough if you want to feel that you are in Old Mexico. There are dozen of coloful gifts stalls selling weird dolls, cancles, small guitars and sombreros but also small restaurants with Spanish speaking staff. Most of the stores are open 10.00-19.00. We listened some mariachi (!), we ate our burritos and then we walked a bit around the area, we saw the Pico House(pic 3) that was the first three story building, a top class hotel in late 19th century and took some pics of the church Nuestra Senora Reina (pic 4) and relaxed at La Plaza(pic 5), the square that was the epicentre of the business that era and now the epicentre of the events (usually dancing and singing)

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    Free Events

    by rrnewt1 Updated Aug 11, 2009

    There are more, this what i plan to do =

    Free historic walking 50 minute tours are given of EL PUEBLO DE LOS ANGELES, every Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m., 11 a.m. and noon, the office of LAS ANGELITAS DEL PUEBLO on the south side of the Plaza, between the Firehouse and the Hellman-Quon Building, Monday through Friday live performances outside on the Plaza from 11:00 am – 4:00 pm.

    Thursday, August 13, 7-9 PM AMC Walkway 1st/Palm Ave., Burbank, CA 91502, Lucky 7

    August 14
    12:00 Grand Performance 4th & Grand, downtown LA, Toto la Momposina y Sus Tambores
    8 PM Grand Performance Toto la Momposina y Sus Tambores

    August 16, 4:00—6:00PM PERSHING SQUARE SCOTT MARTIN LATIN SOUL BAND

    August 19
    >7:30 MacArthur Park Javier Garcia Cuban/Irish guitarist and songwriter rocks the new Miami pop sound

    August 20
    7-9 PM AMC Walkway 1st/Palm Ave., Burbank, CA 91502 Louie Cruz Beltran's Latin Orchestra

    Friday - August 21 10:00 AM - 04:00 PM Blood Drive Miller Toyota and Honda - Culver City 9077 Washington blvd

    Saturday August 22 5 pm–7 pm, Latin Sounds at LACMA Johnny Polanco y Su Conjunto Amistad

    ? August 23, 4:00—6:00PM PERSHING SQUARE JORONOMO BURKE AND THE VOO DOO BLUES BAND

    Saturday, August 29,
    2:00PM Long Beach Funk Fest Pine Avenue & Broadway Charles Wright & the Watts 103rd Street Rhythm Band, Mandrill

    ? 8-9:30Pm Pasadena Memorial Park - CORDERO Latin Indie-Rock With Southwestern Style And Rhumba Rhythms

    Sunday, August 30, Fiesta La Ballona 1:30 - 2:30 PM Francisco Aguabella

    -------------------------------------
    ?September 2 7:30 MacArthur Park Huayucaltia Innovative Latin American folk-jazz-fusion band

    September 4 6 p.m. - 10 p.m. First Fridays on Abbot Kinney Blvd. - Venice

    Saturday, September 5 - Monday, September 7 Labor Day Weekend
    Saturday, September 5 6:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.Olvera Street LOS ANGELES CITY BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION

    Saturday September 12
    Festival on Olvera Street
    >6:30 pm MacArthur Park Central American Independence Day Celebration Macondo & the Latin Brothers Veteran singer of La Sonora Dinamita

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    a suggested quick visit to LA

    by David_trip Updated Nov 7, 2007

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    If you are in LA only for a couple of days, here is my personal list of things to see and how to get organized for that. You don't need a car

    1st day: the city
    start from Union Station, an old beautiful train station (reach it by bus or metro, by car you can find reasonably cheap parking). Have a walk to Olvera Street where the historical core of LA is (the old mexican market, the oldest house in LA, the mission of Our Lady of Angels, el Pueblo, it's all there - 2 hours). You can walk towards downtown switching between grand, hope, flower, spring street. Along the way, have a look at the downtown area (the skyscrapers, the city hall, Walt Disney Concert Hall - 2 hours), take the metro redline at 7th / Figueroa to hollywood/highland and visit Gruman Chinese and Kodak Theater, walk of fame, it's all there (2 hours). You can take here the Bus to LA zoo and from there the bus to the Griffith Observatory. You must book in advance by internet. Be there at sunset, when LA turns lazily into the City of Lights (you can stay there until 10 pm).
    If you are not tired yet and want to spend the night out, do it at Sunset BLVD, in the suset strip. There are some clubs that have made the history of music/glamour like The Roxy, The Viper Room, Wiskey a gogo. Take a taxi back to your hotel if you are late.

    2nd day: the beach
    The beach area is particularly alive during weekends and late morning-afternoon. Take bus number 20/720 downtown to Santa Monica. step out and rent a bike somewhere with a lock. you can ride the bike all the way to Venice beach, there is a very nice long and palm lined byke\\pedestrian path. Stop where you like and enjoy the beach, people watching, entartainers, shops, etc. You can spend all the day and early afternoon to go and come back.
    At Santa Monica I suggest a walk on the mythical pier and along third street promenade. At sunset, stay on Ocean Avenue in the Pacific Palisades park at Santa Monica, another set of an endless number of movies. Enjoy the sunset and twilight on the Pacific.

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    The Day of the Dead

    by blaird Written Feb 25, 2003

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    The Day of the Dead comes from Mexican tradition and is held on Olvera Street. It commemorates those that have died & helps keep memories alive even though the people may have passed. It is actually a festive event.

    There are a bunch of things going on like pinata breaking times, mariachis, dancing and an art show commemorating the event. This art exhibit is kind of sad if you start thinking deeply about the people that were lost...I highly recommend deep thinking here.

    There are also shrines of recently lost loved ones and lots of people selling stuff for the holiday. While the event is kind of odd with all the death, it is really a day of celebration and reflection. It's worth the trip if you are in LA around November 1 & 2.

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    Olvera Street

    by blaird Written Feb 25, 2003

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    This is the birthplace of the city of LA. There are a bunch of historic buildings, a string of shops where you can buy souveniers, a couple of restaurants, a Mexican gazebo thing, sometimes musicians, and other events.

    The area is named after the first County Judge, Agustin Olvera, in 1877 and became a Mexican market place in 1930.

    Be careful in this general area, as you will find a large group of roaming bums (mostly alone, not together), and the area is pretty run down when you venture not too far away.

    Open 10:00 A.M until 7:00 P.M

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    amandafinch's Things to Do Tip

    by amandafinch Updated Aug 24, 2002

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    Though this picture is dark, it shows the natural walls that the buildings here are made of. Reddish in hue because of the desert mud they were made with so many years ago, the walls give off an ancient feeling as they continue to stand. Inside the buildings, the temperature rests around 75 or 80 degrees night and day due to the thickness of the walls.

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    Pueblo Los Angeles

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Feb 25, 2013

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    Pueblo Los Angeles
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    Olvera street is the heart of the original Mexican town that grew into modern LA. Today it's a center for Mexican culture.

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    Hammel Building 1909

    by Yaqui Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Built to house light industrial shops by Marie Hammel. It was eventually enlarged when Olvera Street expanded their Mexican marketplace in 1930.

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    Chinese Tenant Building 1898

    by Yaqui Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Sostenes Sepulveda built this house for $300 for the Chinese tenants. It housed the Italians, but returned to the Chinese. By 1953 it became part of El Pueblo Historical Monument.

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    Where LA was 'born'

    by Yubert Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    I found Olver Street had great deals on Laser Pointers. Some packages included several laser heads for different beam patterns were only $3 to $5 USD.

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