Ludlow Travel Guide

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Yaqui
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Yaqui
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Yaqui

Ludlow Restaurants

  • Basaic's Profile Photo

    by Basaic Updated Aug 14, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I was tooling down Interstate 40 and was kinda hungry so I decided to stop here in Ludlow. Ludlow barely exists, I don't remember much here except the cafe, a dilapidated motel, a gas station and a few lonely looking trailers and small houses. The cafe had the feel of an old-fashioned diner and had some informative signs about the history of the area outside. Food and service was passable. Worth a stop if for no reason other than the historical value of an old Route 66 Diner, and a glimpse of a formerly thriving town. There are also almost no alternatives between Barstow and Needles, a stretch of about 125 miles.

    Favorite Dish: I had a breakfast of eggs, bacon and toast. It was about average.

    Ludlow Cafe Ludlow Cafe
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    by Yaqui Written Dec 24, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Use to be called Friends Coffee Shop during it the hey days of Route 66, now it is called Ludlow Coffee Shop. A wonderful establishment that has been able to sustain itself along a very empty stretch of interstate that has seen so many other businesses disappear. It was nice to see that it is still here.

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    by Yaqui Written Dec 24, 2008

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    Just one of those unique places located just about in the middle of nowhere. This is a very busy business. It has all the attributes that many travelers are looking for a place to stop, rest, and refresh because there is still a long road ahead. It is not a big place, but has some decent food, restrooms, and has a gift shop too. We stop here a couple of times to grab something to eat and stretch our legs. My boys always ask for ice cream.

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Ludlow Off The Beaten Path

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 30, 2012

    The plaque reads:
    ...and they shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks: nation shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war any more. Micah 4:3

    With the end of World War II and the onset of the Cold War, America embarked on an ambitious program to ensure the nation's preeminence in the nuclear arms race. To this end Edward Teller and the Atomic Energy Commission detonated hundreds of nuclear devices underwater, underground, and in the atmosphere. Weapons development remained paramount, but the AEC also held a mandate to develop peaceful uses for atomic power. In 1957 California's Lawrence Livermore Laboratory launched an experimental program called Operation Plowshare to use nuclear energy for such applications as power plants, medicine, mining, the extraction of oil and natural gas, and for the excavation of canals, harbors and roadways. Under Plowshare, a 1963 feasibility study was conducted for Project Carryall, a plan to realign the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad and provide a route for Interstate 40. 23 nuclear explosions totaling 1.8 Megatons were to be used to excavate 1 2-mile cut up to 350 feet deep through the Bristol Mountains east of Ludlow and remove 60 million cubic yards of rock. Despite many assurances of safety from the AEC, obvious environmental and health concerns over this and other Plowshare projects caused several postponements, and in 1968 the project was dropped completely. 28 nuclear tests were conducted under operation Plowshare before its termination in 1975. Plaque dedicated by The Billy Holcomb Chapter of the Ancient and Honorable Order of E Clampus Vitus in cooperation with the Bureau of Land Management and the Knoll Family May 2, 2010. (Marker Number 134.)

    Located in front of Ludlow Coffee Shop 68315 National Trails Hwy, Ludlow, CA 92338, Off of Interstate 40, exit Ludlow

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  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 30, 2012

    The plaque reads:
    Seeking a more efficient way to get borax from his mines on the east side of Death Valley to processing facilities near Los Angeles, and hoping to tap the booms at Rhyolite, Tonopah, and Goldfield, Nevada, Francis Marion Smith built the Tonopah and Tidewater Railroad. Construction started at Ludlow in August 1905 and proceeded quickly across Broadwell Dry Lake (just north of Ludlow), reaching Dumont by May 1906. However, it took nearly a year to build through the difficult terrain of the Amargosa Gorge. Originally planned to extend from Tonopah to San Diego, the line reached its terminus at Beatty, Nevada in October 1907. While the T&T was a lifeline for the East Mojave Desert residents, it rarely turned a profit. In 1933 the 26 miles of track between Ludlow and Crucero were abandoned, and the trains stopped running June 1940. The tracks were taken up in 1942 and 1943. Only the roadbed remains. The shops and headquarters of the T&T were located here at Ludlow, just south of this marker. Little remains of the facilities that for 18 years serviced the locomotives and rolling stock of the Nevada Shortline. Plaque dedicated October 14, 2007 by The Billy Holcomb Chapter of the Ancient and Honorable Order of E Clampus Vitus in cooperation with the Knoll Family and the Bureau of Land Managament. (Marker Number 128.)

    Located in front of Ludlow Coffee Shop 68315 National Trails Hwy, Ludlow, CA 92338, Off of Interstate 40, exit Ludlow

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  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    by Yaqui Updated Dec 24, 2008

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    The first time we drove by Ludlow, it looked like desolate little ghost town. When we headed back home, we stopped at the Dairy Queen and realized that this little town was not dead yet. Some businesses are doing well and keeping it alive. Although, many of the old buildings are decaying, but give a glimpse into the hey day of the old Route 66 days. These old buildings are very popular with photographers and those who can remember when these establishments were still open. I bet those were special times.

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