Malibu Things to Do

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    by Yaqui
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Best Rated Things to Do in Malibu

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    Adamson House State Park

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 14, 2014

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    The house was built in 1929 by Rhoda Agatha Rindge and Merritt Adamson. It was designed by architect, Stiles Clements. It was only a summer home for many years till in 1937 it became a year around home. This two-story house even has an elevator, which was installed specifically for Mrs. Adamson in 1958. She lived in the home till she died in 1962. The State of California purchased the property in 1968.

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    The Adamson House

    by pigletsmom Updated Feb 22, 2004

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    Living Room Adamson House

    Do not miss the Adamson House if you are visiting Los Angeles. It is located on the coast in Malibu. The house was built in 1930 in Spanish Revival Architecture. The entire house is extraordinarily beautiful. It is a smaller version of Hearst Castle. In fact, a student of Julia Morgan's, the architect for Hearst Castle, designed the Adamson House. Visit the webstie to get an idea of the beauty of this house. The house sits on the Malibu Lagoon. The historical tours of the house are very interesting. There is also a very nice gift shop on the premises that sells replicas of the Malibu tiles.

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    Legacy Park

    by Yaqui Updated Apr 2, 2011

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    Malibu Legacy Park is 15 acres at the heart of Malibu where four natural coastal habitats meet – ocean, lagoon, creek, and bluffs. Its purpose is to treat the stormwater run off that captures 2.6 million gallons and disinfect it. Malibu is the only city in the state to build three stormwater treatment facilities. The park consists of native plants and creates natural habitats for creatures local to the area, while creating a place for everyone to enjoy and help create an outdoor environmental class room.

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    California Historical Marker No. 966

    by Yaqui Updated Apr 2, 2011

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    NO. 966 ADAMSON HOUSE AT MALIBU LAGOON STATE BEACH - Designed by Stiles O. Clements in 1929, this Spanish Colonial Revival home contains the best surviving examples of decorative ceramic tile produced by Malibu Potteries. During its short existence from 1926 to 1932, Malibu Potteries made an outstanding contribution to ceramic art in California through its development and production of a wide range of artistic and colorful decorative tile. The home was built for Merritt Huntley Adamson and Rhoda Rindge Adamson, daughter of Frederick Hastings Rindge and May Knight Rindge, last owners of the Rancho Malibu Spanish grant.

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    Malibu Tiles at the Adamson House

    by pigletsmom Updated May 5, 2004

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    Malibu Tiles from the Garden

    The house is filled with fantastic artisan tiles from the 1930s.
    The house was a showcase at the time for Malibu tile, a brand of artisan tile that copied the designs of Moorish Spain. These tiles completely adorn the interior of the Adamson house and gardens. The tiles are absolutely lovely and each tile is a little work of art. Really wonderful and unique to California. The bookshop sells excellent replicas of Malibu Tile designed by Keit Studios, a very talented design team working out of Ojai.

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    Inspired recreation

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated May 24, 2008

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    Step down into history
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    Preserved by the mud that smothered it when Vesuvius erupted in 79AD, Herculaneum's Villa dei Papiri was the inspiration for John Paul Getty's dream of recreating a piece of Rome in the canyons of Southern California to house his vast collection of antiquities and art. No expense was spared when construction began in the early 1970s and even more money was poured into it with a nine-year-long renovation that saw the Villa re-opening in 2006 as the Getty Museum's Antiquities Museum.

    The original building was completely rebuilt and the steep canyon walls around the villa entrance were lined with concrete and stone treated to recreate the strata of an archaeological dig so that the visitor walks down through the layers to reach the front door . It's all very impressive in its meticulous attention to detail and use of the finest materials and workmanship. The final result is not, as is often said, a faithful reproduction of the Villa de Papiri - rather it is something of a pastiche with elements of many such villas from these ancient times.

    Some of it works beautifully, some of it is more than a little naff! There is so much to admire here, but I was left wishing they'd left some of the details to the visitor's imagination. The sculptures in the galleries, worn and softly patinated with age as they are, wear their years beautifully; the modern reproductions placed around the garden look crude and brash in comparison.

    That quibble aside, there is so much to admire here. The rebuilding has seen the villa altered in some spaces to better suit the display of the artifacts and the flow of visitors, and to admit more natural light to reach the galleries, a definite improvement on the original layout.

    There are 29 galleries on two floors. The lower galleries open off an Atrium with an open skylight over a central pool. The Atrium leads to the Inner Peristyle, a garden courtyard surrounded by a columned porch. To the right of the Inner Peristyle, and open to it on one side, is the Triclinium - the villa's dining room. This space has been left empty to make a feature of the intricate geometric marble designs on the floor and walls and the grapevine-painted ceiling.

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    Past lives

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated May 17, 2008

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    Women...
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    With over 44,000 objects to choose from, the Getty Villa chooses to display some 1200 of the wonderful artifacts in its collection by themes rather than by civilizations or time lines - women, men, children, the stage, sports, etc. The aim of this approach is to place the artifacts into a context of the lives of the people of the times, making many of them less "works of art" (though there are plenty of those) than functional objects with a purpose and a meaning to the people who made and used them. Others are connected by more fanciful or ritualistic themes - Gods and Godesses, monsters and griffins and tales of the Trojan Wars.

    It's an interesting approach and makes for some fascinating comparisons, not only with the civilizations on display here, but also, in some case, with modern day life. Everyday objects such as toys amd mirrors, lamps and beakers are given as much emphasis as sculptures of bronze and marble, golden jewels exquisite frescoes. Each gallery is a complete unit, a little museum in itself. It's most satisfying.

    Interactive displays and family activities work together to make this as interesting a place for children as it is for historically-minded adults.

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    Cabrillo Plaque

    by Yaqui Updated Apr 5, 2011

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    On October 10, 1542 Famed Spanish Explorer Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo

    Discovered a large Chumash Indian Village close to the sea at wheich he first claimed possession of Alta California lands for the King of Spain. He was greeted by the indicans who went to his ships in many swift canoes which inspired Cabrillo to name the village. "The Pueblo De Las Canoas" - The town of the canoes, some historians believe the large Chumash Indian village located here at Malibu Lagoon was indeed Cabrillo's "Pueblo De Las Canoa". Dedicated by Malibu Historical Society Malibue Lagoon Museum October 10, 1987

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    HEAD NORTH ON PCH FOR SYCAMORE COVE

    by travelgourmet Updated Jan 7, 2011

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    PACIFIC OCEAN, FIRE PIT, PICNIC TABLE AND SHADE
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    Malibu has 27 miles of coastline and at the very northern end on the Ventura County side hiding in front of the trees that line PCH (Pacific Coast Highway) at this point is Sycamore Cove Beach (Point Mugu State Park). This is a beach that should be kept hidden and secret from all but those that know about it, but then it is one of the few beaches that allow canned beer and plastic containers of alcohol on the sand. Sycamore Cove is also one of the few beaches with not only restrooms but fire pits and picnic tables under the trees on the sand. A great family beach.

    Across PCH, on the mountain side are 50 camp sites for overnight camping. Back on the beach side, you can see many dolphins swimming in the ocean, right from a picnic table. The shade of the trees come in handy on the sunny, warm days. Yes, this is part of California's treasures and we must make sure that it is available to all, always.

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    Roman gardens

    by TheWanderingCamel Written May 17, 2008

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    East Garden
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    The gardens at the villa have been just as carefully recreated as the villa itself. Featuring fountains, reflecting pools, hundreds of varieties of Mediterranean plants and dozens of statues and busts, they are very beautiful.

    Surrounded by a columned porch on all sides, the Inner Peristyle has a fountain set among amid Mediterranean plants and flanked by reproductions of statues, all placed where the originals were found at Herculaneum.

    A doorway under the stairs leads from the to the East Garden, a smallprivate walled garden with a colourful mosaic wall fountain and a central pool whee a bronze fountain plays. Mulberries and laurels shade the garden here.

    The Inner Peristyle leads through to the Outer Peristyle (A peristyle is covered walkway), the villa's largest garden. The garden is set out with low hedge-edged paths and plants mentioned in Roman texts - pomegranate, ivy, myrtle, iris, acanthus and oleander - around a magnificent 220-foot-long reflecting pool where a bronze sculpture reclines on a rock at the end. More replica sculptures stand around, placed where the originals were found at the Villa de Papiri. Under the roof of the peristyle, the walls are painted with swags of flowers and fruit, stone benches provise places to sit and contemplate the scene and, from the far end, the view over the Pacific would have delighted the most jaded of Roman aristocrats.

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    Leo Carrillo State Park Beach

    by Basaic Updated Oct 30, 2007

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    Leo Carillo State Park
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    Leo Carrillo State Park was named for Leo Carrillo (1880-1961), actor, preservationist and conservationist, who served on the California Beach and Parks commission for eighteen years, and was instrumental in the state's acquisition of the Hearst property at San Simeon.
    Carillo is best known by older Americans as the man who played Pancho, the sidekick to Duncan Renaldo's Cisco Kid, an early 1950's TV series. He was also related to a long line of famous Californians. The park has 1 1/2 miles of beaches for swimming, surfing, windsurfing, surf fishing and beachcombing. You can also explore the tide pools, coastal caves and reefs. There are also facilities for camping, back-country hiking, and nature walks. There is a small visitor center has interpretive displays. During the summer, children's programs are available.
    The park is open from 7 AM to 10 PM. The gate is locked from 10 PM to 7 AM. For more detailed information/more photos, see my Leo Carrillo State Park Page.

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    Tidepooling

    by giampiero6 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    There is some really cool tidepooling that you can do at the northern end of Malibu at the point dume beaches. Once you are at the top of point dume, head south and you will see some stairs going down to a lovely beach. When the tide is out, you can see starfish, sea slugs, lots of crawlies. In my experience, this has been one of the better spots.

    *remember to not collect stuff from tidepools and don't disturb things.

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    THE GETTY VILLA MALIBU

    by travelgourmet Updated Apr 9, 2011

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    GETTY VILLA MALIBU MUSEUM ENTRY WAY
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    A name known throughout Los Angeles is Getty. Most people will associate the name with the Getty Center of Los Angeles, but there is another Getty that should get your attention a well, The Getty Villa Malibu. Both are now museums of antiquity and neither should be missed while in Los Angeles. Advanced Timed Reservations are a must for the Villa. The Center, in the Sepulveda Pass, is more busy and contains much more than the Villa and also has a fabulous view of the west side of Los Angeles. The Villa is more sedate and has an easy feel to it. Being close to the Pacific Ocean also gives it a cooler atmosphere.

    Located right on PCH at 17985 Pacific Coast Highway just before Malibu coming from Santa Monica. There is no fee to enter, but you must remember to have your advance time reservation in hand to get in. There is a parking fee, which is a must, unless you are arriving by taxi. Check out the Getty Villa website to make your reservation. It will show you what days and times are available to enter and you can print out your tickets for entry. Try to do this in advance, as soon as you know you are going to go.

    There are many objects to view. Statues, art works, jewelry, coins, and antiquities from the Greeks, Romans and Etruscans. You will be walking the entire Villa, inside and out, two stories, and a restaurant, gift shop, lectures, and shows to peruse. I found that just walking the length of the outer peristyle pool and garden was a wonderful experience with statues and different types of flora dotting the grounds. Each room in the Villa has a theme, some with vases and cups, others with marble seats and sarcophagus with detailed figures. Most appealing was the jewelry collection, rings and coins from 300 BC. The Getty Villa even has a learning center to enjoy some of the art forms from ancient Greece.

    I have additional photos on the Getty Villa in my Travelogue section. They only scratch the surface of what there is to see at the Getty Villa. All in all, a great day in Malibu.

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    Corral Canyon Trail

    by Basaic Written Oct 30, 2007

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    Corral Canyon Trailhead
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    The Corral Canyon Loop Trail is a treelined trail leadibg from the beaches at Malibu up into the Santa Monica Mountains. It is about the last remaining unspoiled canyon trail in LA County. A variety of trees surround Corral Creek as it winds down the mountainside to the ocean. The creek flows from its begining in Malibu Creek State Park to its ending at Dan Blocker Beach. The trail is not overly difficult and can be enjoyed by the whole family. The land it is on was formerly owned by the beloved entertainer Bob Hope. You can access the trail from a pay ($4.00) parking area located next to the Malibu Seafood Restaurant.

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    Point Dume

    by giampiero6 Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Point Dume Seen From the North

    Point Dume is a lovely jutting whale hump of land that sticks out at the northern end of the Santa Monica bay on the northern end of Malibu. The point itself is a beautiful point covered with flowers and succulents and offers a couple of cool lookouts from which you can sometimes see whales migrating. On the rocks far below you can usually hear and see some sea lions honking and roaring and you might see some dolphins. On the rock cliff of the point, you'll see lots of folks rock climbing up the face. If you cruise around the south side, there's a great little beach that you will have to take stairs down to. It's a very pretty beach amid cliffs.

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