Manzanar Favorites

  • Favorites
    by blueskyjohn
  • Favorites
    by blueskyjohn
  • Favorites
    by blueskyjohn

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  • blueskyjohn's Profile Photo

    A dark time in U.S. history

    by blueskyjohn Updated Mar 5, 2015

    Favorite thing: During a campaign address in Brooklyn New York on November 1, 1940, President Franklin D. Roosevelt said:

    "We are a nation of many nationalities, many races, many religions—bound together by a single unity, the unity of freedom and equality. Whoever seeks to set one nationality against another, seeks to degrade all nationalities. Whoever seeks to set one race against another seeks to enslave all races. Whoever seeks to set one religion against another, seeks to destroy all religion."

    This quote is written on a board in the visitor center and under it is written:

    On February 19, 1942, President Roosevelt signed executive order 9066, which led to the forced removal of Japanese Americans from the west coast into camps like Manzanar.

    In this day and age I could not imagine what it must have been like for the Japanese people. I realize how the country was in shock and angered at the events of December 7, 1941 when Japan attacked Pearl Harbor. However, on second thought, I could imagine how people felt after being attacked. I work directly across from NYC and the World Trade Center when it was attacked. An event that shocked the world.

    We as a nation evolved on some levels apparently. Could you imagine if President Bush signed an order to intern all Muslims because the attackers on 9/11/2001 were Muslim? Essentially, that is what President Roosevelt did.

    So this was a valuable lesson we learned at the cost of Japanese-American lives.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Family Travel

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  • Hopkid's Profile Photo

    Get a National Park Service Passport

    by Hopkid Updated Dec 3, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: These are really fun and spark interest in the National Park Service system. The brainchild of a marketing genius, the purchaser can get a stamp from each of the NPS sites he or she visits. The collection of these stamps, similar to postal cancellation postmarks (which include the name of the park and the date visited) become fun to collect. It's a great way to get the kids (of all ages!) excited about going to different parks, monuments, seashores, etc. that are operated by the NPS.

    The passport itself is reasonably priced and the stamps are, of course, free. Each NPS facility has a stamp available at the visitor's center. If you don't see it just ask the ranger on duty. Some (e.g., Mt. Rushmore, Cape Hatteras Lighthouse) have special stamps with a depiction of the area/monument. Great fun!

    You can obtain an NPS passport at any park Visitor's Center or online at the National Park Service Store.

    You can find the passport stamp at the Visitor's Center. Further afield you can also get stamps at Devil's Postpile National Monument in Mammoth Lakes (approximately 2 hours north on U.S. 395 and west on California Highway 203) and at Yosemite National Park (approximately 3 hours north on U.S. 395).

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park

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