Mount Hermon Travel Guide

  • Dali Smells the Redwood Bench Along Sequoia Trail
    Dali Smells the Redwood Bench Along...
    by atufft
  • Cabin Barbeque Made From River Rock
    Cabin Barbeque Made From River Rock
    by atufft
  • Dali Along the Sequoia Trail
    Dali Along the Sequoia Trail
    by atufft

Mount Hermon Things to Do

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    by atufft Updated May 26, 2008

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    The cabins of Mt. Hermon were originally designed as places of retreat from life in San Francisco. Our family cabin was built by a church youth group during a summer in the 1920's, and certainly lacks the structural integrity code enforcement would require today. It's a single wall construction building not properly bolted to it's crumbling concrete footings. Nevertheless it has survived many earthquakes, possibly because of the bedrock upon which it is built. Neighboring cabins have been expanded and modernized, but the redwood siding and fencing is still very popular here. New construction does it's best to build around trees, rather than remove them.

    Mt. Hermon Home Cabin Barbeque Made From River Rock Family Cabins of Mt. Hermon The Tufft Family Cabin in Mt. Hermon The Tufft Family Cabin in Mt. Hermon
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    by atufft Written May 26, 2008

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    We typically take the dogs to the cabin so that we can let them run off leash along the Sequoia trail. During a recent trip, for example, friends of ours brought their English Setter pup who had to be kept on leash, while our minature schnauzer led the way. There are wonderful stairs and logs to climb along.

    Dali Along the Sequoia Trail Dali Climbs Stairs Along Sequoia Trail Dali Smells the Redwood Bench Along Sequoia Trail Dali Returns to the Cabin at Mt. Hermon
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    by atufft Written Nov 8, 2005

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    The Sequoia trail begins at the last Mt. Hermon Conference Center lodge and goes east above Bean Creek. The trail is easy for even the unfit to walk, as it has steps and pedestrian bridges in places. Numbered markers along the way provide stops for meditation, and there's a meditation vista about a third the way along the trail east. Features along the trail include some of the largest coast redwoods in the area, and a step under one that crosses the trail. About two thirds along the trail there's a bench carved from a redwood trunk that's been there since I was a kid forty years ago. Several trails branch off to go down to the creek. At the end of the trail, beyond the last and largest pedestrian bridge, which was rebuilt after it collapsed in the Loma Prieta earthquake, there's a fallen trunk that serves as a short cut to the creek.

    Sequoia Trail Mt. Hermon Bean Creek Mt. Hermon Redwood trunk bench Restored bridge on Sequoia Trail Mt. Hermon Walking under Fallen Tree on Sequoia Trail
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    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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Mount Hermon Restaurants

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    by atufft Written May 26, 2008

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    Felton has a Safeway Grocery Store, and we often bring to the cabin what we need for a meal. The cabin stove is adequate for any cooking, but I always enjoy firing up the old river rock barbeque. Fresh cooked ribs, corn-on-the-cob, and a freshly opened bottle of Bonny Doon wine makes for a great meal. If it's too cool outside, we crowd around the dining table.

    River Rock Barbeque at Mt. Hermon Dining Inside the Cabin at Mt. Hermon
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    by atufft Written Jul 5, 2006

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    The Conference Center has cafeteria style meals for those participants of the conferences, but there is also a fountain that is open until as late as 10pm. No alcohol is served, but a variety of ice cream sundaes, sodas, and coffee are served. From 6 to 7pm, the fountain closes during evening chapel services, but othewise the hours are quite good from mid-morning to rather late at night. Prices are reasonable and service friendly.

    Favorite Dish: There is nothing particularly special about this fountain, but it does beat walking into Felton if one would rather stay in Mt. Hermon.

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  • Mount Hermon Hotels

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Mount Hermon Nightlife

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    by atufft Written May 26, 2008

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    After dinner, we often bring out the cards and continue to drink wine around the cabin dining table. We aren't big stakes gamblers, but like to play a game of rummy when conversation isn't enough.

    Dinner's Over, What's Next?
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    • Seniors
    • Travel with Pets
    • Wine Tasting

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Mount Hermon Local Customs

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    by atufft Updated Jul 5, 2006

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    The Banana Slug was made famous because it is the mascot for University of California at Santa Cruz. The slug is definitely much harder to find in Mt. Hermon area than it was in the past. During summer months, it is especially hard to spot them because of the dry conditions as they will go beneath the surface foliage and debris from the redwood trees. When we were kids, we tortured and killed slugs with salt, and of course many, such as the one in the photo accidentally get stepped on. But, because of their bright yellow color, they are easy to spot, perhaps another reason humans have hurt their survival. Please don't kill them as they are beautiful creatures.

    Medium Sized Banana Slug Climbing Redwood Tree Small banana slug in Santa Cruz mountains Medium Sized Banana Slug Climbing Redwood Tree
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Mount Hermon Warnings and Dangers

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    by atufft Written May 30, 2008

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    Poison Oak is endemic throughout the Santa Cruz mountains, so avoid it or expect an uncomfortable rash. Sensitivity varies with individuals and exposure, but the immune response can actually get worse with repeated exposure to the active chemical ingredient. Some individuals severe response may require hospitalization. The plant is dormant in winter, so while it's possible to get a rash from dead twigs, it's less likely. During the active growing season, the leaves are green and tender, much like an oak leaf, and tend to be less potent. In my experience, the worse time of year to get a good rash is during the fall when the leaves turn fall colors. You can also get a good case of the rash by sleeping with a dog who has walked through the forest brush, while the animal itself will not be affected. Seek medical advice if the rash turns into serious swelling or persists for awhile, but often simply reducing the itchy feeling with vinegar will help. The best solution is to avoid walking through the brush. Trails are often cleared of the plant, and with practice, you will learn to identify and avoid it. See the photo and links...

    Poison Oak

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