Oroville Off The Beaten Path

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Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Oroville

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    Hike To Beatson Falls

    by briantravelman Written May 17, 2014
    Beatson Falls
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    There are around 20 different waterfalls on Table Mountain (all seasonal), which usually flow from mid December-mid April, though these last few winters, have been a bit dry, so it varies from year to year.
    I will just mention the ones, that are the most spectacular, and most popular.
    There was a time when these waterfalls were known only to a few locals, but now they are known all over the country, and even Canada.

    The 104 foot high, Beatson Falls, is one of the most spectacular waterfalls, on Table Mountain, but it only became popular with hikers, about 2 years ago. The first few times we went, we had the whole place to ourselves, but on our most recent visit, there were a few hikers, and climbers. But still, It’s most popular in the spring, during wild flower season. If you go before, or after, you can have the place to yourself.
    The falls are still a spectacular site. The geology here is a bit different, which makes for some interesting landscape. There is a nice gorge, and a cool pinnacle formation. There is also a small cave behind the falls, but we haven't figured out how to get to it yet. It looks difficult.
    The stream is a bit difficult to cross. It requires climbing down a small gully, and than actually crossing the stream. My dad somehow made it the first time, but I couldn't do it without actually getting into the water. IDK how he did it. The other times, there was less water, and it was dryer, so the crossing was much easier.
    There is also an abandoned ranch on the way. I always like to stop there, and play on the tire swing.

    The falls are a bit far from the parking lot, but pretty easy to get to. Head to Hollow Falls, than follow the stream through Beatson Hollow. There are some old ranching trails, you can use. Keep following the stream past the old ranch, and you will eventually make it.
    The only part that's a bit confusing, is in Beatson Hollow. There is a junction of 2 streams, and you want to head, west. If you head south, you will end up at the other parking lot. If you're a first time visitor, it's a good idea to have a map and compass, or go with someone who knows the area, because it gets confusing, even for me.
    There used to be a website with maps, but I can't find it now, but if you leave me a comment, or message me, I will upload it, for you.

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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Adventure Travel

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    Hike To Phantom Falls

    by briantravelman Written May 17, 2014

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    Spectacular Shot Of Phantom Falls
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    There are around 20 different waterfalls on Table Mountain (all seasonal), which usually flow from mid December-mid April, though these last few winters, have been a bit dry, so it varies from year to year.
    I will just mention the ones, that are the most spectacular, and most popular.
    There was a time when these waterfalls were known only to a few locals, but now they are known all over the country, and even Canada.

    The most spectacular, and second most popular, is Phantom falls, also called Coal Canyon Falls.
    The falls is 164 feet high. Although it's not the highest waterfall on Table Mountain, it is the most spectacular, and my most favorite.
    The falls is about a 2 mile hike from the parking lot, and usually takes me about an hour.
    From the big oak tree, just head north, until you reach the property fence, follow the fence to the west. There is a stream, and you will reach a ravine, with a smaller waterfall. You have to walk around the fence, than from there continue northeast, and you will eventually reach Coal Canyon.
    You can also take the longer route, and see Hollow and Little Hollow Falls.
    There are no trails or signs, so unless you know the area, it's a bit difficult to find, so a good map helps.
    Unfortunately, I can no longer find the website, with the maps, but if you ask me, I will upload it for you.
    If not, Fish and Game does guided hikes to the waterfall, in the spring.

    If you are lucky enough to find this falls, it's truly an incredible spot. It reminds me a lot of Venezuela. You will forget you are in California.
    For the REALLY adventurous hikers, you can hike down the slippery gully, to the base of the falls. This is always my favorite part of the adventure. There is a large grotto there, the largest on Table Mountain, an abandoned mine shaft, and a nice pool. For the REALLY, REALLY adventurous tourists, you can pack a rope with you, and climb down the mineshaft. It's good to have a friend with you, for that one.
    It's also a great place to see newts, frogs, and banana slugs.
    I would highly recommend the hike down to the base, it's truly worth it. It's a spectacular spot.

    I've probably been here ate least 20 times, and this is still my favorite spot, in Oroville. Each visit is different, and it never gets boring.

    There is also a Little Phantom Falls, very close by. Just walk along the canyon, and you will reach it. That one is smaller, but also has a cave, that you can actually crawl into. There is also rock you can climb, and see both falls.

    The hike to the falls, is an adventure in itself. You see a lot of nice stuff, along the way. If you're visiting Oroville during the rainy months, the hike to Phantom Falls is a must.
    Because of its recent popularity gain, the falls gets a bit crowded during the spring, and on weekends, even the base, but if you go during the weekday, especially in the winter months, you can still have the whole place to yourself.

    I read that the CCC, wants to built a small railing, at the overlook.

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    Hike To Hollow Falls

    by briantravelman Written May 17, 2014

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    Hollow Falls
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    There are around 20 different waterfalls on Table Mountain (all seasonal), which usually flow from mid December-mid April, though these last few winters, have been a bit dry, so it varies from year to year.
    I will just mention the ones, that are the most spectacular, and most popular.
    There was a time when these waterfalls were known only to a few locals, but now they are known all over the country, and even Canada.

    The most popular one is Hollow Falls, since it's the closest to the parking lot. The waterfall is easy to get to, because there is now a trail. Just park your car next to the big oak tree, go through the gate, walk past the oak tree, and just follow the stream. You will eventually see a cliff. Cross the stream, and walk up the cliff, to get a view of the falls, which is about 45 feet high.
    You can also hike down, to the base of the falls, just watch out for poison oak. On a warm day, it's not a bad swimming spot. I even caught a garter snake, on my last visit. If you're really adventurous, you can climb next to the waterfall.
    There are more spectacular waterfalls on Table Mountain, but the people who don't want to hike very far, just hike to this one, so it can get really crowded, during the spring time. If you want to have the place to yourself, go on a weekday, or during the winter months.
    There are also two smaller waterfalls, nearby, but they aren't as large.
    In the spring time, you can see some excellent wild flowers, around the falls.

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    Oregon Gulch Falls (Burma Falls)

    by briantravelman Updated May 17, 2014

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    Oregon Gulch Falls
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    Oregon Gulch Falls, also called Burma Falls, is a small seasonal waterfall, located past the Oroville Dam, next to the Thermalito Diversion Pool.

    To get there, just drive the entire dam, than go downhill past the spillway, and park at the small parking lot at the end. There is a cattle gate, and a series of dirt trails that lead into the woods. You can get to the waterfall, via these trails, but there is no sign saying which one leads to the waterfall. I hike there frequently, and even I have trouble remembering which trail to take. It can be very confusing. The first time I went out there with my friend, we got lost, and never reached the falls.
    I recommend walking a few yards up hill, on the road you came on. You will see a large gate. Don't mind it. The gate is just there so cars won't go up there. Just hop the gate, and stay on the gravel road the entire time, until you reach the red bridge. On one side of the bridge, is the Diversion Pool, on the other side, is a stream. There is a small trail, that runs through the woods, above the stream. Just follow the trail, and you will reach the falls.
    You can either hike, or ride your bike to the falls.

    The falls only flow during the rainy months, usually mid Dec.-mid April, but this varies from year to year. The amount of water, depends on how much rain there was. If the water is low, you can climb to the top of the falls, and cross to the other side.
    The weather is usually too cold for swimming, so I've never done it, but if it's warm enough, you can try.
    Even if you can't swim, you can still come just to see the falls, and the trout swimming around.
    We usually have the place to ourselves, but sometimes you will see other hikers.

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    Oregon City

    by briantravelman Written Jan 6, 2014

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    Oregon City Covered Bridge
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    Located about 6 miles outside of town is the historic unincorporated area in Oregon City. Located just east of North Table Mountain. It was established in 1848, by a group of Oregonians who came looking for gold.
    They built a small bridge, school, and post office, Today, only the bridge and the school house remain.
    The bridge is an icon of the city, and was even used as a filming location in the movie "Beetlejuice".
    The school (the oldest in the county), used to have its original interior, and tourists were allowed to visit, but unfortunately it was recently converted to a church.

    The town is still worth visiting, if you're interested in local history. It's a good side trip, if you're visiting Table Mountain.
    During the rainy months, a small creek flows through here.

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    Cherokee

    by briantravelman Written Jan 6, 2014

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    Ruins Of Cherokee Bank
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    These are the ruins of Cherokee Bank located on Table Mountain in Butte County! The town was named after a group of Cherokee Indians who were brought there by Welsh miners during the California Gold Rush, and established their own small community! Today, it is a ghost town and all that remains are ruins, but the surrounding area is home to about 20 people!

    About 9 miles outside of Oroville near Table Mountain, lies the old mining town of Cherokee. The town was named by Welsh miners, after a group of Cherokee Indians who were brought here from Oklahoma in 1949. Today, the town is home to around 70 people, and has an old post office, train cart, well, museum, and ruins of an old bank.
    The town was established during the California Gold Rush, and is the site of the world’s largest hydraulic gold mines. Thomas Edison even owned a mine here, and President Rutherford Hayes, William T. Sherman, and John Bidwell, all visited the mines in 1880. Today, the mines sit on private property, but some of them can be seen from the road.
    You can visit Cherokee’s historic district.

    It’s a bit out of town, but if you’re interested in history, and have a car, I would definitely check this place out. It’s still one of my favorite places in Oroville. This is a good place to visit, if you’re visiting Table Mountain, or the Kirshner Wildlife Sanctuary.

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    • Archeology
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    Kirshner's Wildlife Sanctuary

    by briantravelman Updated Apr 30, 2013

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    European Brown Bear
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    Tucked away on Durham-Pentz Rd.between the region's famous buttes, is the Berry. R. Kirshner Wildlife Sanctuary. The original location was in Durham, but it was moved to Oroville, a few years ago. It is currently located on Durham-Pentz Rd., about 3 miles past Butte College. The sanctuary is like a zoo, which holds special needs animals, rescued and donated from other zoos and shelters. Although small in size, the sanctuary contains some of our planets rarest and most exotic animals, including white and Sumatran tigers, the almost extinct snow leopard, the genetically engeneered liger, clouded leopard, coatimundi, fennec fox, and giant tortoises; along with some native species such as coyotes, mountain lions, black bears, gray foxes, and bobcats.
    The big animals are all in the cages and are easy to find, the other ones are not so easy. They also have snakes, alligators, monitors, and parrots there, but I have no idea where they keep them. There aren't any signs, so it's really hard to find stuff. I wouldn't have even found the tortoises if I didn't see some people staring at them. I only saw the animals in the cages. Most of the property is houses, so I don't know where they keep the rest of the animals, but if you ask them, I am sure they will tell you.
    They also had some kangaroos, lemurs, a muntjac, and a porcupine, but the last few times I was there, half the cages were empty, so I don't know what they did with them. The bears are my favorite though. They're really fun to watch.
    One bad thing is, that the animals are double caged for safety, so it's hard to get a good picture, and some of them like to hide in the back, and are hard to see, but they're still fun to watch.
    This is a really rare find in a place like Butte County, so if you have a chance, deffinately check it out. There is a $7 entry fee, and all proceeds go to the animals. You can also sponsor an animal for $100-1,000 a month, depending on which category you apply in. They are open 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM, everyday except Monday, but there is almost no one manning the entry table on weekdays, so you have wait 10-15 minutes before you can pay. They also do tours for small groups, but you have to ask ahead of time, because they're staff is small, and their schedule is really packed.
    Don't bother calling, because they never answer the phone, or respond. It's best to just show up in person.

    Related to:
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    • Zoo

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    Table Mountain

    by briantravelman Updated Dec 23, 2011

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    South Table Mountain
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    Table Mountain is the large volcanic plateau on the outskirts of town. It can be seen form almost everywhere in town and you can't miss it.
    It is actually divided into two parts. The one with the large "O" is South Table Mountain. It is advised that people don't go up there without permission, as it is private land and there is a crazy guy up there who will shoot you with a beem bag.
    The neighboring North Table Mountain contains an ecological reserve and is accessible to visitors. However, everything east of Cherokee Rd. is private, and there are some patches of private land that border the ecological reserve. The land is used for grazing cattle though, and no one actually lives up there, so no one will care if you trespass or not. There are a couple houses further, so if you see any don't walk by them.
    From early December to mid April, vistors can get a look at some of the area's seasonal waterfalls. The most popular ones are Phantom Falls, Hollow Falls, and Fern Falls. There are about 20 different waterfalls up there. Most of them are in such remote areas, and so little known, that they are seldom visited. New waterfalls are constantly being discovered, and some of them are still unnamed. Some of the larger waterfalls also conrtain caves, and there is an abandoned mineshaft at Phantom.
    The best time to visit is early March to mid April when the plateau is blanketed with miles of spring wildflowers.
    There are no hiking trails anywhere, and it is very easy to get lost if you don't know the area, so it is recommended that vistors print out a good map, or go with someone who knows the area, and watch out for ravines and posion oak. They do offer free tours the first and third Saturday of each month during spring. It is advised that you not visit during the summer, as rattlesnakes are present, temperatures are really hot, and you won't see much anyways.
    The best way to get there is to cross the Table Mountain Bridges over the Feather River, and take Cherokee Rd. You should pass the large sylicon mine.
    A few years ago, Table Mountain was so little known, that only a few locals knew about its hidden beauty. Now it is becoming more and more popular with tourists every year. Now tourists from all around Northern California and even other states, and as far as Canada visit this magnificent wonder of nature every year. Most tourism is in the spring, when people come from all over to see the wildflowers bloom.

    For more information visit Wikipedia, and see the link below.

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    Feather Falls

    by Tom_Fields Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Feather Falls
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    The spectacular 600-foot Feather Falls is in a beautiful valley similar to the more famous one in Yosemite--but without the crowds. The hike is a good nine miles round trip.

    On the way, look to the left for Bald Rock Dome. A huge granite rock, it stands over the valley like a silent sentinel. It's similar to El Capitan in Yosemite.

    Also, observe the mortars (depressions) in the rocks along the way. Indians created them while grinding acorns on the rocks. They made them into a paste (I always wondered what that tasted like).

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    Bald Rock

    by Tom_Fields Updated Mar 18, 2007

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    Bald Rock
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    On a clear day, this site offers a splendid view of the northern Central Valley. When I visited, in mid-summer, no one else was around at all. Here is one of California's unspoiled, hidden treasures.

    From Oroville, take Hwy. 162 North to Berry Creek, right on Bald Rock Rd. Pavement ends, go 2.2 miles on gravel rd, turn left into parking area.

    The phone number is for the Lake Oroville Visitors Center.

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