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  • The Ferry Building
    The Ferry Building
    by riorich55
  • Financial District Buildings
    Financial District Buildings
    by riorich55
  • San Francisco Pacific Coastline
    San Francisco Pacific Coastline
    by riorich55
  • guell's Profile Photo

    Tipping Taxi Drivers

    by guell Written Mar 17, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: There is no set rule. I can only tell you what I do. I typically give a minimum of 15% and round up to the nearest $5. It’s so much easier this way. For example a $3.90 fare becomes $5.00, a $7.50 fare becomes $10, a $17.00 fare becomes $20.00 and so on. So, it’s more than 15%, but considering what these drivers make for a living, I don’t mind.

    Remember to talk to your drivers. They are usually very friendly and helpful.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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  • guell's Profile Photo

    Tipping at Restaurants

    by guell Updated Mar 17, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Gandhi Statue at the Ferry Building

    Favorite thing: In calculating your daily food budget, remember to add 15-20% to your total.

    In San Francisco, as in most of the U.S, the service is NOT included at restaurants. There are exceptions to this rule, but the exceptions are clearly stated on the menus. It is customary to tip a minimum of 15% of the cost of the meal (before taxes), but if you get excellent service or if you receive a complimentary dish, you should leave 18% to 20% or at least round up to the nearest dollar.

    Most servers earn minimum wage and rely on the money they make on tips, so remember to be good to your waiter if your waiter has been good to you.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Food and Dining

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  • finnegan's Profile Photo

    Characters of SF

    by finnegan Updated Mar 10, 2003

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Stockton Tunnel - Noir Style

    Favorite thing: Another thing that says something about the people of San Francisco, apart from the better known things like that the Haight District is where the whole hippie movement started [local columnist Herb Caen invented the term 'hippie' as a bit of a slap to what he saw as young punks trying to use the Beat Generation's (also an SF thing, centered in North Beach) definition of 'hip' as an excuse for lazing around, thus 'hippie', sort of like a small hip person)(Haight Street actually declared itself a seperate republic for a short spell, but when the authorities did nothing about it everyone must have felt they lacked something and just sort of forgot about it) and other things, are in one event and one old personage.

    The person was Emperor Norton. Norton was a fat cat end of the 19th century, rail money I think, but lost it all and took to drink. His wealthy friends took pity on him because he was a)harmless and b)funny. his mind sort of started drifting from its moorings. Here was a guy who was essentially a prototype homeless, eating in the best restaurants and staying for free at the Mark Hopkins and the Fairmont hotels, his amused friends footing the bill.

    One day Norton declares himself Emperor of the World, insisting everyone address him as such. And they did and it just sort of stuck. Then one day norton decides he will print his own money and starts waving it around insisting he'll pay this time. His friends, all wealthy, instruct the waiters and such to accept it and they'll make good on it. Eventually so much Norton cash was floating around town that people not even remotely connected with this crowd started using it as an unofficial local currency.

    That's local colour story #1.

    #2 is that when Jerry Garcia of the Grateful Dead died, they flew a tie-dye flag at half mast from city hall.

    I mean, you just gotta love it.

    Fondest memory: Going to see Brritt Alley - where Miles Archer, partner to Sam Spade, was shot to death at the beginning of "The Maltese Falcon" (the book and the film). There is a plaque there commerating this fictional event.

    But be warned - it tells whodunnit!

    Off Bush Street, just west of the top of the Stockton Tunnel - the small dead-end alley next to the Tunnel Top Bar (good drum 'n' bass bar owned by French people).

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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  • snmred's Profile Photo

    So much to see....

    by snmred Written Feb 25, 2003

    Favorite thing: San Fancisco is a tiny city. It's only 7 miles by 7 miles but what's inside that area is larger than most cities. You can find anything and everything there. Just use your imagination and make sure you go with an open mind to explore.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel

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  • 100ACRE's Profile Photo

    COLORFUL TOUR BOOK

    by 100ACRE Written Dec 3, 2002

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: For a nice illustrated, paperback travel guide to the City: 'Eyewitness Travel Guide to San Francisco and Northern California (revised)' by Linda Williams. Here's a sample page from this book. (Click to enlarge.) Most of your touristing in this City will be in the Districts highlighted on this sample page: Chinatown, Fisherman's Wharf, Marina, Presidio, Golden Gate Park. With this book, you'll know the City better than most natives. This book will orient you to the City's colorful history, culture and landscape.

    Fondest memory: I survived the earthquake of 1989. Oh, and about that earthquake of 1906, the history can be found online (copy & paste this in your browser) http://quake.usgs.gov/info/1906

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  • 100ACRE's Profile Photo

    WHAT'S HAPPENING THIS WEEK IN THE CITY

    by 100ACRE Updated Nov 15, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Go online for more information at www.sfgate.com (along the left margin on this webpage look at the 'Regional' section and look at the 'Entertainment' section).....when you arrive in SF, for current entertainment & map guides, pick up a free 'This Week in San Francisco' booklet (from your hotel or from around town); buy the Sunday SF Chronicle for the pullout 'Datebook Section'; or visit the SF Visitor's Bureau discussed in my 'Transportation' section. (With all this information, you'll be armed and dangerous.)

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  • frqtflyr's Profile Photo

    Golden Gate Bridge - Different View

    by frqtflyr Written Feb 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Golden Gate Bridge

    Favorite thing: San Francisco covers the tip of a 30mile
    (50km) peninsula in Northern California, with the
    Pacific Ocean on its western side and the San Francisco
    Bay to the north and east. San Francisco is just one
    of many cities in the Bay Area; others include Oakland
    (east across the Bay Bridge), Berkeley (north of Oakland)
    and San Jose (an hour's drive southeast of San Francisco,
    near the southern tip of the bay). Marin County and the
    Wine Country lie to the north, across the Golden Gate
    Bridge.

    The Bay Area has three major airports. San Francisco
    International Airport is on the bay side of the Peninsula,
    14 miles south of the city center. The city of Oakland, at
    the eastern end of the Bay Bridge, has its own airport 8
    miles south of downtown. San Jose International Airport,
    at the southern end of the bay, is a few miles north of
    downtown San Jose and one hour drive from San Francisco.

    Related to:
    • Business Travel

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  • NewTribe's Profile Photo

    Go to the corner of Market &...

    by NewTribe Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Go to the corner of Market & 2nd Streets...there you will find a Rand McNally
    Store, you know maps, books, etc, very serious travel info...anyway ask for a copy of
    Rand McNally' San Francisco Cross Street Directory. The Bible for serious Bike Messengers, Cabbies, and other Delivery type persons...never, leave home (your hotel, hostel, friends house etc) without it. Now you're ready to ROCK...SF unlike most American cities, is easy in terms of size to navigate, ( traffic permitting) by whichever means you choose...Apprx 49 m2, or 126.90 km2 in area...

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  • Roeffie's Profile Photo

    View on San Francisco

    by Roeffie Written Aug 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: View on San Francisco

    Fondest memory: History of San Francisco

    A Spanish writer at the end of the 15th century wrote a made-up story about a far land, he called California. The streets are paved with gold and jewelry. This fable gave the Spanish great spirit to find such a place and to exploit it for the next two hundred years. The Spanish never found any gold along the Northern Coastline the name is still California.

    San Francisco became an important trading post for the Spanish and afterwards for the explorers. Its Bay is one of the biggest natural harbours of the world and is protected on three sides by land. In 1848, it was still a very small town of about 800 inhabitants, but after the “gold rush” of 1849 San Francisco grew fast from 800 to 340,000 inhabitants in the next few decades. The city was built on money, bribes and corruption. Opiumhuts flourished in Chinatown and brothels along the north beaches. Unstable wooden buildings spread over the hills in a disorganised way.

    In 1906 San Francisco was struck by the famous notorious big earthquake. The fires destroyed the town. After this designers were gathered for a meeting to recreate the town as we know it today.

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  • kuuunmg's Profile Photo

    San Francisco covers the tip...

    by kuuunmg Written Aug 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: San Francisco covers the tip of a 30 mile (50km) peninsula in Northern California, with the Pacific Ocean on its western side and the San Francisco Bay to the north and east. San Francisco is just one of many cities in the Bay Area; others include Oakland (east across the Bay Bridge), Berkeley (just north of Oakland) and San Jose (an hour's drive southeast of San Francisco, near the southern tip of the bay). Marin County and the Wine Country lie to the north, across the Golden Gate Bridge.

    The most touristed part of the city resembles a slice of pie, with Van Ness Ave and Market St making the two sides and the Embarcadero the round edge of the pie. The steaming toppings of this homebaked slice are the classy shops around Union Square, the highrise Financial District, the classy Civic Center, the down-and-out Tenderloin, swanky Nob Hill and Russian Hill, Chinatown, North Beach and the epicenter of tourist kitsch, Fisherman's Wharf. To the south of Market St lies SoMa, an upwardly mobile warehouse zone of clubs and bars that fades in the southwest into the Mission, the city's Latino quarter, and then the Castro, the center of gay life.

    The vast swathe from Van Ness Ave west to the Pacific Ocean encompasses upscale neighborhoods like the Marina and Pacific Heights, ethnically diverse zones like the Richmond and Sunset districts as well as the self-conscious timewarp of Haight-Ashbury. Three of the city's great parklands - the Presidio, Lincoln Park and Golden Gate Park - are also in this area.

    Making a circuit of the 49-Mile Drive is a good way to check out almost all of the city's highlights. The route is well posted with instantly recognizable seagull signs, but a map and an alert navigator are essential. Do yourself a favor and allow a whole day to complete the circuit.

    The Bay Area has three major airports. San Francisco International Airport is on the bay side of the Peninsula, 14 miles (22km) south of the city center. The city of Oakland, at the eastern end of the Bay Bridge, has its own airport 8 miles (13km) south of downtown. San Jose International Airport, at the southern end of the bay, is a few miles north of downtown San Jose and an hour's drive from San Francisco.

    Greyhound is the only regular long distance bus company operating to the city - all bus services arrive and depart at the Transbay Terminal in SoMa. Amtrak's rail network connects the Bay Area with the rest of the continental US and Canada. Its main stations are in Oakland and Emeryville, both in the East Bay. CalTrain links San Francisco with the peninsula and San Jose; its depot is in SoMa.

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  • zwack's Profile Photo

    Background on a city is always...

    by zwack Written Aug 24, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Background on a city is always helpful when traveling. Take note of the following as you discover and re-discover the magic of San Francisco.
    Geography:
    Surrounded on three sides by the Pacific Ocean and San Francisco Bay, San Francisco's compact 46 square miles (125 sq. km.) crowd the tip of the San Francisco Peninsula.
    Population:
    'The City' has a population of 723,959; nevertheless it looms large in the imagination as the hub of the greater Bay Area. The nation's fifth largest metropolitan region registers a population of 6 million and hosts over 16 million visitors, conventioneers and business travelers each year.
    Weather:
    The San Francisco Bay Area has some of the best weather in the nation. For year-round temperatures and a comprehensive five-day weather forecast.

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  • Open Mindedness

    by zChris Written Aug 24, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: San Francisco is quite accurately known for its tolerant, liberal atmosphere...one that seems to breed wild eccentricities. A visitor from more conservative regions or countries should be aware that some of the behaviour of the city's citizens, whether they be homeless or nouveaux riches, can be either curious, amusing, or horrifying. Like a true San Franciscan, either ignore such things or pretend to do so. You must keep an open mind and not observe people's behaviour as if they are clowns in a circus. Some of th people on the street are deliberately putting on a show, and it is polite courtesy to pay attention. But if somone is attempting to bring a cause to attention, it is wiser to respect that than to mock said person or, worst of all, treat him or her like a street ornament to be photographed. Of course, capturing the mood of the city on film is a worthwhile activity, but in attempting to do so, do not alienate the subjects by appearing to be more of a tourist looking for something to put into a vacation album than a serious urban anthropologist type. Most of all, do not label people with nicknames or stereotypes, or do so in a loud and brandishing fashion. Do not even attempt to do so while in private conversation with someone from the city. San Franciscans are sensitive to their city's diversity, both of race and of ideology, and will not appreciate what they will perceive as closed-mindedness. Appreciate the city's eccentric residents, do not be put off by them or treat them as curiosities.

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  • judyaf's Profile Photo

    The whole city of San...

    by judyaf Written Aug 24, 2002

    Favorite thing: The whole city of San Francisco is a must see. It is only 7 miles square and bordered on three sides by water. You can't go too far astray! Just too many things to list.....Coit Tower, Lombard Street, Gharidelli Square, Pier 39, Cable cars, Golden Gate Bridge, Golden Gate Park, Museums, Theater, Shopping, Marina District,

    Fondest memory: I call it HOME! Lived here for 35 years and only left for business reasons. San Francisco Bay Area is the one of the most beautiful places on earth.

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  • MikeyUK's Profile Photo

    How much space do I have - I...

    by MikeyUK Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Favorite thing: How much space do I have - I could go on and on. This just has to be my favourite city. I don't have enough words in my vocabulary to describe my feelings for San Francisco. Its just a shame that I live so far away - oh well, thats enough of my ramblings. I just hope that you enjoy the place as much as I do.

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  • shohman's Profile Photo

    Kerouac

    by shohman Written Jan 16, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Jack Karouac spent much time here, he was clearly unfluenced by the city and in turn the city was influenced by him.

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