Golden Gate N.R.A., San Francisco

21 Reviews

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    to baker beach
    by machomikemd
  • parking at lands end
    parking at lands end
    by machomikemd
  • hiking
    hiking
    by machomikemd
  • Callavetta's Profile Photo

    Land's End

    by Callavetta Updated Jun 8, 2004

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    The Golden Gate

    It's called Land's End. Even though it's on the 49 Mile Drive and is adjacent to the Lincoln Park Golf course, it's a must see destination for any visitor to SF. From this vantage point, it's clear why it's called the "Golden Gate". And it's also clear, why it was obscured to explorers for so many years.

    It's also a fantastic vantage point to watch the Blue Angels from, when they do their annual show during Fleet Week.

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  • gilescorey's Profile Photo

    Stunning Seascapes...

    by gilescorey Written Jan 21, 2004

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    Marin Headlands

    Venture over the Golden Gate Bridge to the Marin Headlands. The narrow winding roads crest far above the deck of the bridge and offer amazing vistas of the city, bay, and ocean. The scenery is dramatic, and the high bluffs reminded me of my travels in Ireland. This is a MUST for any visitor to San Francisco.

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    Marin Headlands, Golden Gate Natl. Recreation Area

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Mar 21, 2004

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    Overlooking the Pacific Coastline along Hwy. #1

    The Golden Gate National Recreation Area, on both sides of the Golden Gate Bridge, covers 75,398 acres, making it the largest urban National Park in the USA. It is 2 1/2 times the size of the City of San Francisco, and includes 28 miles of coastline. One of the best and last open areas is along CA-1, just north of the city. There is a Visitors Center for the Marin Headlands, hiking trails, Point Bonita Lighthouse, and some of the most stunning coastal scenery to be found anywhere.

    To reach the Marin Headlands Take US-101 across the Golden Gate Bridge and follow it to CA-1. Turn left and this highway will take you north along the Pacific Coast. The road is narrow and winding in places. Allow plenty of time to stop along the way and admire the view.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park
    • Beaches

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  • ymike2000's Profile Photo

    Fort Mason

    by ymike2000 Updated Aug 27, 2003

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    Kelly and Mike on a windy pier

    West of Fisherman's Wharf is Fort Mason. A former military base, it's now used in several different ways.

    In Upper Fort Mason, there's a serene park area in which a hostel is located. There's a number of private residences. There's a walking/bike trail that offers a fantastic view of the bay.

    At the piers of Lower Fort Mason, there is a bustle of activities ranging from classes and workshops to entertainment events and expositions. A lot of people fish from these piers, too.

    Hint: Valet Parking is $8 at the Lower Fort Mason Piers. You can save that money driving to the Bay and Franklin Street Entrance of Upper Fort Mason and driving to the hostel. There's 3 hour parking right next to the building. It's a quick 5 minute walk down to the piers, though you will have to go up the stairs to get back to your car.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Theater Travel

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  • Bwana_Brown's Profile Photo

    The Big Guns

    by Bwana_Brown Written Apr 18, 2003

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    Battery Townsley

    From down by Ft. Kronkhite at Rodeo Beach, you can look up into the hills and see a massive concrete structure built into the hillside. There are actually two of these gun implacements, placed in-service in 1938 to house the largest naval guns of the time, two 16-inch monsters of the type used on battleships. These weapons were to defend the mouth of San Francisco Bay, with their firing range of 23 miles out to sea! The guns are now gone (retired in 1948) but the labyrinth of tunnels and ammo magazines still remain, as seen here on our meandering walk through the hills on the now abandoned road network.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Fort Mason

    by Ewingjr98 Written Jul 17, 2007

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    Fort Mason Piers & Warehouses
    1 more image

    Fort Mason was established in 1860 and grew to huge importance as the San Francisco Port of Embarkation, supplying US forces in the Pacific during World War II and the Korean War. In the 1960s, Oakland Army Terminal became the main port of embarkation through the Vietnam War, and the Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) took over the the fort in the 1970s. Today Fort Mason is the headquarters of the GGNRA, and is used for its open parks, the marina, and for cultural events in the old warehouses and piers. Fort Mason also has a hostel and many of the historic Army houses can be rented from the National Park Service.

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    Fort Point National Historic Site

    by MDH Written Jul 19, 2003

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    Fort Point underneath the Golden Gate Bridge

    Now this is one remarkable structure that has survived all the disasters and transformations that the city has experienced in the last 150 years. Built between 1853 to 1861 by the U.S. Army, it was meant to act as a guardian to the harbor in case any hostile fleet wished to steam in, especially the French and British. During the Civil War, the fort was used to guard the harbor in case the Confederate navy ever arrived, which they never did. The army withdrew from the fort in the 1880s as there was no longer any military threat to San Francisco, and was used in the World Wars as a depot and training facility.

    When the Golden Gate Bridge was built, the engineers decided to either build over it or demolish the place. They chose to build over it, which is the reason why the bottom of the bridge on the San Francisco County side arches in order to go over the fort.

    Today, it's run by the National Park Service. The place has been used in a number of films and television shows. Some of the best views of the gigantic Golden Gate Bridge overhead are here.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • An evelated and scenic hike in Lincoln Park

    by Coarstours Written Aug 12, 2004

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    Towards Cliff House

    Upon reaching the Pacific Ocean on the western end of Golden Gate Park, we found the famous Cliff House closed for renovations. So we redirected our energies north and followed the trails to the Sutro Bath ruins named after Adolph Sutro these grounds hold only the ruins of a once enormous glass enclosed roman bath santuary. Futher up the trail, torward point Lobos, you get to stroll amoung groves and firs and look down at the Pacific as it curls into South Bay. You can see a glimpse of the Golden Gate Bridge peeking out from the bluffs. From Point Lobos one gets fabulous views of the Bridge, the Bay and the Pacific Ocean all in one shot.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Archeology

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  • karen75's Profile Photo

    Sutro Baths

    by karen75 Written Jul 13, 2003

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    Sutro Baths

    Sutro Baths opened in 1896. The remains of the pool can be seen just north of Ocean Beach. The actual house was in the midsts of being demolished in 1966 when a fire finished it off. The Sutro Baths were the last major project of millionaire, Adolph Sutro.

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  • SHAWNA20's Profile Photo

    China Beach

    by SHAWNA20 Updated Feb 13, 2003

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    There's a tiny beach, I think called China beach, we found when we were just driving around. It was a very peacefull rocky/sandy beach, great for relaxing. I wouldnt recomend swimming there, but just for a get away, it was nice. It had a wonderfull veiw of the Golden Gate Bridge.

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  • ycnan's Profile Photo

    Great Walk

    by ycnan Written Jun 1, 2003

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    Fort Mason is a terrific place just to take a walk. It's near the tourist places along the wharf; an easy walk or bus ride away. The views of the bay and The City are wonderful. Also, on weekends, you'll often find exhibits and events. There are small museums and a very good vegetarian restaurant (Green's). It is right next to the yacht harbor and the Marina Green. The weather is usualy cool and foggy, but if you're lucky, you be there on a sunny day. You can get picnic food at nearby Safeway supermarket.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park

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  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Hiking and Walking Along Lands End

    by machomikemd Updated Nov 1, 2010

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    hiking
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    This is a good off the beaten path activity for hikers, joggers, biker dudes and plain ole locals plus tourists as it is not a crowded part of San Francisco the best part it that it is free. Well I have to start my review and here it goes, the Spanish named Lands End's westernmost promontory Point Lobos, so-called for the many lobos marinos (sea wolves, or sea lions as they're known today) that once hauled up on the rocks offshore. The rocks are now roosts for two dark bird species, cormorants and oystercatchers, among others. Trails at Lands End offer a cliff-top walk through shadowy cypress, with scenic overlooks, 30-mile views of the coast, and foot access to several shoreline pocket beaches so if you are nature dude or a bicylce dude or just a plain brisk walker or hiker dude, then this park is for you. These wave- and wind-carved headlands west of the Golden Gate connect two popular landmarks: the Cliff House and the Palace of the Legion of Honor and the views of the golden gate here are better than in touristy vista points since it provides a nature backdrop to the golden gate bridge so try this activity now!

    Address: El Camino Del Mar, San Francisco, CA 94121
    Directions: El Camino Del Mar, San Francisco, CA 94121, From downtown San Francisco, take Geary Boulevard west about 5 miles. At 41st Avenue stay right as Geary splits and becomes Point Lobos Avenue. About 500 feet past 48th Avenue, turn right (north) into the Merrie Way parking lot, where there is ample parking so do this tip now,

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing

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  • Mirja's Profile Photo

    Point Bonita Lighthouse...

    by Mirja Updated Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Point Bonita Lighthouse (www.lighthousegetaway.com/lights/calif1.html): Go over the Golden Gate Bridge direction Golden Gate National Recreation Area. From there it is down a one mile road, through a tunnel and across a suspension bridge. You have a spectacular view over the bay and the Pacific. If the weather is good enough and the sky is clear you'll be able to see the Golden Gate Bridge. For people who would like to spend the night in that fantastic area, try the YMCA on top of the cliffs.

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  • american_tourister's Profile Photo

    Marin headlands. This is a an...

    by american_tourister Written Aug 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Marin headlands. This is a an enormous state park located across the bay from SF. It has gorgeous views of SF and old forts and buildings to explore. Great bike and hike trails, lots of flora and fauna. A good day out away from the city and a really short trip. This photo is a Blue Jay that I saw there.

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  • Jtaylor's Profile Photo

    Camera Obscura, antique...

    by Jtaylor Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Camera Obscura, antique camera, built in 1946 that provides a 360 degree live view of Ocean Beach and Seal Rocks. Admission is only $1.00. Located below the Cliff House Restaurant, 1090 Point Lobos Ave.
    415-386-3330

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