Ghost Towns, California

10 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Ghost Towns
    by Yaqui
  • Ghost Towns
    by Yaqui
  • Ghost Towns
    by Yaqui
  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Barstow~Calico Ghost Town

    by Yaqui Written Jun 12, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    Calico’s name was derived for the many colors that King Mountain possessed with its blue, red, gray, green, vermilion, brown, and yellow rock. Perched high against King Mountain, Calico Ghost Town has experienced way too often, what fires do to old mining towns. Luckily, for Calico, it keeps alive by those who see her as a living institution that continues to tell her colorful stories and educate many of us what it must have been like to live among the fiery days of the desert sun and survive the bone chilling evenings.

    Calico prospered when silver was discovered. Once the mine started to go bust, approximately $86 million worth of silver was found in King Mountain from 1881-1896. Yet, borate was still lucrative and about $45 million worth was mined till 1929. She boasted at one time having at least 20 saloons, several red light districts, merchants, restaurants, hotels, and even a China Town. Her population almost exceeded 1,200 souls. Oh, let us not forget the famous four-legged postal carrier who brought mail to the vast mining camps that graced all around King Mountain.

    Open 10:00 am--4:00 pm Daily, also by Appointment
    (Subject to Staff Availability)
    Telephone: (760) 254-3679
    Email: calico@mscomm.com

    Write: Lane House & Museum
    Calico Ghost Town Regional Park P.O. Box 638
    Yermo, CA 92398

    Billy Holcomb Chapter No. 52.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • sim1's Profile Photo

    Looking through a window...

    by sim1 Updated Mar 3, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Shop in the Ghosttown of Bodie


    It is not possible to go inside quite a few buildings, but peaking through the window was just as good, it was like peaking into the past. We could took a look through the window of this shop for instance. It was just like the shop was closed for lunch, and the owner would return soon. Hmmm.... what shall I buy...?

    Take a look at my Bodie page for more photos and info.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • National/State Park
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • sim1's Profile Photo

    A desolate place

    by sim1 Updated Mar 3, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The ghost town of Bodie


    It is an empty desolate place. It is very cold outside and there are still some patches of snow although it is the end of May already.

    In this picture you can see a typical example of the little wooden houses that are here. The guide, that you get at the entrance of the park, tells you some more about who has lived in these houses, their family history and sometimes how they died. Looking at the houses and reading these stories make the place come alive and imagine how it must have been like in those days.

    Take a look at my Bodie page for more photos and info.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • sim1's Profile Photo

    The Ghosttown of Bodie (California)

    by sim1 Updated Mar 3, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The ghost town of Bodie


    Bodie is a State Historic Parc that kept commercial tourist activity to a minimum. Much of the town was destroyed by fire, but what remains today is a remarkable representation of what life would have been like "in the old days". Many builings remain, and in fact contain furnishings, clothing articles, kithen supplies, and other household items left behind by their owners. The Park Service maintains a policy of 'arrested decay'. Things are allowed as they were one hundred years ago..... the only thing they do is try to preserve the builings in their present state. The result is a remarkable display of history.

    Bodie was named after Waterman S. Body who discovered gold here in 1859. By 1879 Bodie boasted a population of about ten thousends and was second to none for wickedness, badmen an "the worst climate out of doors". Killings occurred with monotonous regularity, sometimes becoming alsmost daily events. Robberies, stage holdups, and street fights. Provided variety, and the town's 65 saloons offerd many oppertunities for relaxation after hard days work in the mines.

    One little girl, whose family was taking her
    to the remote and infamous town, wrote in her diary:
    "Goodbye God, I'm going to Bodie"

    Take a look at my Bodie page for more photos and info.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • sim1's Profile Photo

    The Ghosttown of Bodie (California)

    by sim1 Updated Mar 3, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The ghost town of Bodie


    Not a lot of people visit this place, but it is really worth while. Bodie is a real Ghost Town : there is no MacDonalds, no tourist trinkets, no motels, one bathroom and no paved road to get there on. Bodie is an old mining town which had it's heydeys during 1880. As many as 12,000 people lived here during that time. Mining actually continued till the 1930's.

    Today, it stands just as time, fire, and the elements have left it : a genuine California gold-mining ghost town. When you walk through this town, you look at the houses, shops, and saloons. All the furniture still there, only with a thick layer of dust....you can just imagine how it must have been in the past.

    You can find Bodie in California, but it is on the other side of the Sierra Nevada, close to the town of Bridgeport. If you have any chance to visit Bodie : Go there!

    Take a look at my Bodie page for more photos and info.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • sim1's Profile Photo

    The Ghosttown of Bodie (California)

    by sim1 Updated Mar 3, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Ghosttown of Bodie
    1 more image


    When I arrived in the ghosttown of Bodie it was cold and deserted. Only 2 or 3 more people walking around. I walked around and I couldn't imagine that people used to live here, it was so deserted, cold and unfriendly spot.

    When I walked around, I looked at the houses, shops, and saloons.... all the furniture is still there, only with a thick layer of dust....I could just imagine how it must have been in the past. Bodie is a fantastic place to visit, a real must see! It's a bit 'off the beaten path' though, so that's why you can find more tips about this ghosttown in that category.

    Take a look at my Bodie page for more photos and info.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • sim1's Profile Photo

    Cars lying around, untouched for ages....

    by sim1 Updated Mar 3, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The ghost town of Bodie


    There are cars laying around, untouched for ages.
    It is weird but fascinating to look at this cars that is rusting away. To many people, they may be just a heap of scrap. But to me there is a kind of beauty in it, seeing how they melt away in their surroundings.

    Some cars have been laying around here for such a long time that there is not much left of them. It is really fascinating to see these cars laying around in this unreal landscape.

    Take a look at my Bodie page for more photos and info.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • speedy77's Profile Photo

    Calico - ghost town

    by speedy77 Updated Mar 30, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    More than a century ago, the town of Calico was bustling with prospectors. Founded in March 1881, it grew to a population of 1,200 with 22 saloons and more than 500 mines.
    Silver was the king, and Calico district became one of the richest in California, producing $86 million in silver, $45 million in borax and gold.
    After 1907, when silver prices dropped and borax moved to Death Valley, Calico became a ghost town.

    Was this review helpful?

  • lihue's Profile Photo

    To the north of Mono Lake lies...

    by lihue Written Sep 7, 2002

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    To the north of Mono Lake lies the ghosttown of Bodie, which is accessed by a 10 miles gravel road. Many buildings are well conserved and while walking through the dusty streets one can imagine how life must have been a century ago.

    Was this review helpful?

  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    BODIE STATE HISTORIC PARK

    by mtncorg Written Nov 30, 2003

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Gravestones in cemetary at Bodie

    High among the mountains east of Bridgeport is the ghost town of Bodie - the one-time home of Mark Twain, for a season at least. Ghostly remains lie strewn about reminding us of times long gone.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: California

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

91 travelers online now

Comments

View all California hotels