Other California Sights, California

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  • Other California Sights
    by Yaqui
  • Other California Sights
    by Yaqui
  • Other California Sights
    by Yaqui
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    Arcadia~Santa Anita Park

    by Yaqui Updated Oct 26, 2013

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    Arcadia’s first settlers were the Tongva/Gabrielino Native Americans who date back at least 7,000 years, and many of their earlier beginnings where recorded by the missions that settled in this area and archeological sites. The Spanish government deeded 13,000 acres of land to its first white settler Mr. Hugo Reid who established ranges for grazing cattle and building the first adobe, thus becoming Rancho Santa Anita. Passing through many hands, Elias Lucky Baldwin, a gold investor eventually became the next land owner of 8,000 acres who was drawn to the lush green rolling hills dotted with oak trees and declared it paradise. Settlers moved in establishing orchards, farms, and ranches.

    Once called Rancho Santa Anita that extending north from San Gabriel to the Sierra Madre mountain range. Mr. Baldwin also established Santa Anita Racetrack in 1907 equipped with all the modern conveniences, but was closed in 1909 because it was deemed illegal gambling.

    Santa Anita reopened its doors Christmas day in 1934 due to a new group of investors, one of them Doc Strub also since the California deemed legalized pari-mutuel wagering, It was built in beautiful art deco style by architect Gordon B. Kaufman. Many historical events has opened over the past, the first is when Seabiscuit won Santa Anita’s Handicap. It was an Japanese American internment center from 1942-1944. After the war it experienced prosperity again for many years. The 1960’s brought a new chapter during its life by many renovations of offices and grandstands. The Breeders' Cup races have been held here during the 1986, 1993, 2003, 2008, and 2009. The prosperity continued way into the 1980’s and since then it has had its up and downs with corporate changes and additions with retail operations on property grounds.

    Family Day! During Saturday or Sundays they have family day. It is held in the center of the track filled with rides, games, and many more entertainment. Entrance for kids and the carnival rides are free! Nate loved soaring like Peter Pan and the mixer rider, because the little girl who rode with him kept sliding down toward him and they both giggled so loudly!~

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    Rancho Mirage~The River

    by Yaqui Written Oct 26, 2013

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    The River is a beautiful shopping, restaurant, and premier development in Rancho Mirage. It consists of, 30 acres of beautiful waterfront and located along Bob Hope Drive and Hwy 111.

    The River is really decorated beautifully. Lots of beautiful fauna and fountains frame the whole shopping area. Many of the posh restaurants line along the river creating some really wonderful patio dinning experiences. Amenities here include, Borders Books and Music, sample wine & gourmet olive oil at the Tulip Hill Winery, view and purchase art at the Water's Edge, enjoy a movie at the 3,114-stadium seat Century Theatres Multiplex, shop at Loran Loran, or listen to various musicians that is Free in The River's outdoor amphitheater. 



    Dine in one of the many restaurants such as Yard House, Cheesecake Factory, P.F. Changs China Bistro, Flemings Prime Steakhouse, Babe's Bar-B-Que & Brewery, Piero's Acqua Pazza, Maki Maki California/Japanese cuisine and Baja Fresh.

    

If coffee is in order then there is a Starbuck's or Seattle’s Best coffee places or if you desire just dessert, indulge in Ben and Jerry's ice cream. Oh, the Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory is another wonderful place to quench the sweet tooth.

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    Rancho Cucamonga~Victoria Gardens

    by Yaqui Written Oct 25, 2013

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    Victoria Gardens is a area of high end department stores and eateries. They have laid it out like mini city with lots of wonderful plaza's with benches, tables, and lots of lovely landscapes. It just happened to stumble on it while I was exploring this area. There is lots of ample parking garages and metered parking along the streets. Just be careful of the brain dead shopper who do not pay attention while crossing the roads. There is plenty of cross walks and little light signals.

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    Newberry Springs~Route 66~Bagdad Cafe

    by Yaqui Written Oct 25, 2013

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    The signs reads: Bagdad Cafe', Newberry Springs, California. Originally built in the 1950's, this world famous restaurant was the location of the 1988 film, "Bagdad Cafe", which became the new name of the restaurant in 1995. Recognized by Hampton Hotels Save-A-Landmark program as site worth seeing.

This unique piece of Route 66 icon, which is also famous for the cult movie "The Bagdad Cafe."



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    Kramer Junction~Antiques & Military Rentals

    by Yaqui Written Oct 25, 2013

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    Next door to the wonderful antique shop is a hanger filled with a huge selection of ClassicCars and Military Memorabilia. Some of it they even rent out. Ask one of the folks in the antique store if you can take a look. A really wonderful collection!

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    Irvine~Spectrum Center Ferris Wheel

    by Yaqui Updated Oct 25, 2013

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    What an impressive thing to see among a shopping mall. I bet it is beautiful at night with it all lighted up. Nice to having something for everyone in the family to enjoy.

    

GIANT WHEEL:
 Weekday Pricing (Monday to Friday 4:59PM):
1 ticket: $5 (per rider, including children)
6 tickets: $27
12 tickets: $51
Military discount: $4 per ticket*

Weekend Pricing (Friday 5PM to Sunday):
1 ticket: $5
Military discount: $4 per ticket* Check the web site or call to see if any of the pricing or hours have changed.

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    Irvine~Spectrum Center Carousel

    by Yaqui Written Oct 25, 2013
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    I love to see a beautiful Carousel and this one is lovely. It is only fair to having something fun for the little ones.
 Check the web site or call if pricing and if hours have changed.

    Weekday Pricing (Monday AM to Friday 4:59PM):
1 ticket: $3
6 tickets: $15
12 tickets: $27
Military discount: $2 per ticket

Weekend Pricing (Friday 5PM to Sunday):
1 ticket: $3
Military discount: $2 per ticket.

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    Guasti~Historical Plaques

    by Yaqui Written Oct 25, 2013

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    Present by the Ontario Airport Towers these plaques are located on the north side of the street. There is no parking other than at the Towers parking lot or along the street where they have not developed the roads yet. It's a lovely walkway with some really nice landscaped areas. Each of the plaques talk about the history of the Guasti Wine Vineyards. The plaques are done in bronze which is a nice touch, which will stand up to the elements. 

The Plaque Reads: Standing here in 1904, you would see the Guasti Stone Cellar to the south. Many of these workers were migrant and lived in a large tent city south of the railroad tracks at Turner Avenue. During World War II, Italian prisoners of war worked in the fields and werer welcomed by the village residents as secured through the Bracero program. Wages were a jug of wine a week, and company scrip redeemable at the company stone.

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    Calabasas~ Sri Venkateswara Malibu Hindu Temple

    by Yaqui Written Oct 25, 2013

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    Built in 1981 and located in Calabasas, but very near Malibu State Park in a beautiful very detailed traditional Hindu Temple. It was sort of sureal to see it in the mountains on the way to Malibu. The priest live on the grounds to keep an eye on it. The deities at the Malibu Temple include Venkateswara, Rama, Lakshman, Sita, Hanuman, Ganesh, Padmavathi, Bhoodevi, Shiva, Krishna & Radha. Services are welcome to the public and I am not sure about dress codes, but I think it is just common sense what you should wear to a temple. Donations are very welcomed.

The hours are:

The temple is open every day of the year.
Weekdays: Summer hours: 9:00 A.M to 12:30 Noon and 5 P.M to 8 P.M. Winter hours: 9:00 A.M to 12:30 Noon and 5 P.M to 7 P.M.
Weekends&Holidays: Summer hours: 8:00 A.M to 8:00 P.M Winter hours: 8:00 A.M to 8:00 P.M.

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    Avalon ~Wringley Memorial

    by Yaqui Written Oct 25, 2013

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    With its beautiful view of Avalon Bay, the Wrigley Memorial is the centerpiece of the Botanic Garden. Built in 1933-34 by the Chicago architecture firm Bennett, Parsons and Frost. The Wrigley Memorial honors the memory of William Wrigley Jr., who lived from 1861 to 1932, founder of the Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company chewing gum manufacturer. He truly loved the island and he brought numerous improvements such as public utilities, new steamships, a hotel, the Casino building, and extensive plantings of trees, shrubs and flowers. The Wrigley Memorial was to use as much Catalina materials such as blue flagstone rock on the ramps and terraces comes from Little Harbor. The red roof tiles and all the colorful handmade glazed tiles came from the Catalina Pottery plant, which was in operation from 1927 to 1937. The marble inside the tower was quarried in Georgia.

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    Gold Country

    by WulfstanTraveller Updated Jul 4, 2012

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    Downtown Nevada City - Queen of the Northern Mines
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    One of the most historic and interesting regions of California, with a wide range of activities and scenery, is the Gold Country, the primary centre of mining and settlement during the Gold Rush and from 1849 until the 1870s one of the most important centres of commerce, industry, and population in the state.

    As certain gold finds petered out, various parts of it began to wither even in the 1850s, with people hurriedly moving on to the next good gold find, but overall the area stayed important into the 1870s, and some parts like Nevada City and Grass Valley remained particularly important to the mining industry. By the 1870s, though, increased settlement and development of agriculture and other industries in the Central Valley and around the San Francisco Bay Area, once mostly just utlised as support for the mining industry, took the lead and bypassed the mining communities in population and economic importance. Over time, tensions arose between the older mining communities and the newer commercial and agricultural communities. The tension was exacerbated by events such as the great Marysville flood, when Marysville, on the lower Feather River and at the time one of the largest and most important cities in the state, was devastated by a flood blamed on blockage by debris from large-scale hydraulic mining up river near Nevada City. Over time, the miners lost and political power in the state, plus economic emphasis, shifted from them to the rest of the state. The mining region continued to operate major mines, and produce significant amounts of gold, well into the 20th century though.

    As a result of the Gold Country's early development, critical importance to the development of California's identity, economy, and creation as a state, the area is rich in history, sites, and old architecture. This importance, combined with later stagnation, also means that the area is rich in history and towns that retain much of their old-world and frontier character, losing relatively little to modern development which has altered or even destroyed the original character of many other towns.

    This region is in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, particularly the Sierra Foothills on the western side of the mountains and along the eastern edge of the Central Valley. It does not cover the whole area, though, and ranges from Sierra County in the north to Mariposa County in the south. It includes, more or less from north to south, parts of the counties of Plumas Sierra, Nevada, Butte, Yuba, Placer, El Dorado, Sacramento, Amador, Calaveras, Tuolumne, and Mariposa. The real core areas with the most Gold-Country sites to see, and the ones that had the most mining activity, are the counties of Nevada, Placer, El Dorado, and Tuolumne. Although there are many others, major sites in the Gold Country to see include the towns of Downieville, Nevada City (Queen of the Northern Mines), Grass Valley, Auburn, Placerville (Hangtown), Columbia, Sonora (Queen of the Southern Mines), and Mariposa as well as mines such as Empire Mine and Malakoff Diggins, and mines near Columbia.

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    Cantil~Jawbone Canyon Vistor Center & Post Office

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 26, 2011

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    This is a wonderful facility that offers a ton of services. There is a very nice display of OHV gear. Lots of different kinds of literature available. They sell some really nice maps that illustrate all the off road trails. We bought one because we like to off road ourselves every now and then. The lady was so nice and helpful that was there that day. She was a wealth of information. This facility also serves as the post office for the community of Cantil.

One thing to remember respect the desert and all the natural landscapes, plant and animal life. Its our home.

    This visitor station has a mascot. Can you guess? Mister Bob is a 113 year old Turtle as of 2008. He has been cared for in a natural habit at the station for the last eight years and being spoiled rotten by all who adore him. They have ensured he is protected and they have provided him with some really nice digs:-)

We had recently visited to get a soda and use the restrooms. While getting a soda I happened to look down and there he was. He does respond to your voice. As I talked to him, he climbed over rocks to get to me and stuck his head out and up to me. He liked under his chin to be scratched softly. He is adorable. 

Desert tortoises hibernate 9 months out of the year. So Mr. Bob was getting ready to hibernate. So they were feeding him well.

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    Cantil~Red Rock Canyon State Park & Vistor Center

    by Yaqui Written Nov 26, 2011

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    Recently we have been making little week road trips to different locations that are not far from where we live. Red Rock Canyon was one of those stops we made on the way home. We were in luck because the ranger lived in Tehachapi so we were able to chat about our local environment. She was so nice and polite and we enjoyed chatting with her. She showed us a video of a flash flood in 1997 that just about wiped out most of the ranger building and almost one of the locals who happened to be in the park. They had to totally reconstruct everything including that of Highway 14. It’s just one of those elements when you live in the desert to be very wary of “Flash Floods”. Growing up in the desert you learn very quickly how very distructive, dangerous and common they are. Not saying earthquakes are any fun, just one of those elements you deal with.

Once you enter the canyon you quickly see what beauty nature has provided. This area is frequented a lot by tourist for the day, off road recreation, camping or just to roam around taking pictures. The colors are so awesome and I have always admire this place while traveling north on Highway 14. I wish more people would take the time to see this place.

The park is 120 miles north of Los Angeles, via Interstate 5 and Highway 14.

    This is a wonderful example of how these stations what to share and education the public on what nature has provided us. It also illustrates what life was once here. This canyon is very prehistoric. Lots of dinosaur bones have been discovered here and the Native Americans the Kawaiisu Indians called this home. You think how in the heck did they endure here, but they did and used every resource available to them and had flourished for many centuries untouched by us. Of course this did change as history will prove it, once the settlers moved it. So much has been left behind in the Canyon that we were able to learn from them. This center has some awesome exhibits and the rangers are really neat folks. Hours may have change, so always check the site.

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    Independence~The Eastern California Museum

    by Yaqui Written Nov 25, 2011

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    Independence inherited its name from a military outpost/camp that was established along Oak Creek July 4, 1862. This area became a huge lure due to the gold discovery and soon miners and settlers a like flocked in along the Oak Creek. Soon this wonderful town that is in the heart of the Owens Valley became a county seat of sprawling Inyo County in 1866.

    The Eastern California Museum was founded in 1928. To me it has one of the most wonderful collections of local photographs of pioneer families and historic buildings. The exhibits are rich of the heritage of Inyo County and the Owens Valley. There are rare exhibits that include the artistry of the Owens Valley Paiute and Shoshone Indians through basketry and other wonderful historic crafts. 


    They have so many wonderful photographs and mementos of Manzanar Japanese American citizens of the World War II Internment Center. If you wonder outside, you will be able to wonder around a collection of historic agricultural and mining implements used by early Inyo County residents, and equipment used during construction of the Los Angeles Aqueduct. 
They have a museum gift shop that offers many educational material regarding Inyo County and the Eastern Sierra.



    There is no admission charge, but donations are appreciated. 
Open Wednesday through Monday 
10 AM to 4 PM and is closed on Tuesday 
and some major holidays. 
PO Box 206, Independence, CA 93526

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    Coronado~Coronado Beach

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 25, 2011

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    Check out the beautiful beach....Wow!

    Ok, if you wonder to the hotel you need to wonder out to the beach area. This area boast of having one of nicest beaches and they are right. The have little cabana's for hotel guest only. Very clean and and not too crowded.

    We revisited it around dusk. It was beautiful that night. Lots of people milling around and just enjoying the evening beautiful sunset.

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