Grand Junction Things to Do

  • Brochure of the town  east of Grand Junction
    Brochure of the town east of Grand...
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  • Rough road to traverse-NOT Good for Vehicle
    Rough road to traverse-NOT Good for...
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Best Rated Things to Do in Grand Junction

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    art in the outdoors.

    by caffeine_induced78 Written Dec 20, 2003

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    In an effective effort to revitalize Grand Junctions downtown area the city closed off some lanes on Main St to make space for walking traffic. It's a real pleasure to walk down the mall and admire the numerous sculptures lining the 7 block one way walk. I walked it at night in December and the journey was very relaxing with Christmas lights strung in the trees. Keep your eye out for the pieces of art, the city claims that over a 100 are on the strip. I didn't find nearly that many but I'm sure some were small and hidden.

    Main St. for the Holidays
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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Arts and Culture

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    Colorado National Monument

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 11, 2009

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    This seems like a "little" Grand Canyon with the steep crevices and sheer walls of color. John Otto came here in 1907 and loved the canyons, so stayed and promoted this to be a national park. Eventually with GC citizens, the NPS accepted the park in 1911. Otto carved oout most of the traiols taken today. The 23 mile Rim Drive road is the main one going through the park, and winds up the mountains about 2,000 feet. The views are fabulous, both overlooking the park colors and valleys, but also the panorama view of the valley below. Visitor center is at the north end of the park, and has a gift shop and NPS people to answer questions. There are 14 trails that can be taken and around 11 overlooks along Rim Rock Dr.
    The park also connects with McInnis CAnyons that is managed by Bureau of Land Management. It is much more rugged and remote for sites and adventures, but there are trails for hiking, biking, horseback riding. Adjacent to that is the Black Ridge CAnyon Wilderness, an even more remote NCA, and no roads to enter; only foot or horseback.

    Park kiosk to be greeted Visitor center and gift shop NPS counter and gifts Exhibits of the park and canyon formatons
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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Desert

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    Grand Junction Street Art: Western End of Main St

    by atufft Written Aug 5, 2008

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    The large collection of street art found in Grand Junction arrived there in a variety of ways, but in everyway was approved by a committee of citizens. Some work was purchased by commission or grant. Some work was donated by an art competition, and some work remains on display as available to be purchased from the artist. Other works were commissioned by the business where the art work is on display. The western end of Main Street in Grand Junction has a number of important pieces. The selection of art ranges widely in terms of size, materials used, and in style of artistry, so check out all the images.

    Art in Front of the Bicycle Shop A Molded Sculpture in Grand Junction Stained Glass and Iron Work Locomotive Replica Steel Sculpture of a Deer at a Hotel
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    • Seniors
    • Family Travel

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    Grand Junction Street Art: More Art on Mainstreet

    by atufft Updated Aug 5, 2008

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    The City Hall has a nice modern art piece, and there is an outstanding sculpture fountain, but then there are some small private contributions, and a bust of a civic leader too. Grand Junction's collection of street art is truely impressive...

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    Botanical Gardens and Riverwalk

    by atufft Updated Aug 5, 2008

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    Until a few years ago, the Colorado River was a dumping ground for old cars and trash. Now, volunteer organizations have restored the natural wetland shores of the river right within the city of Grand Junction. A Botanical Garden and Museum is located at the foot of 7th Street, just across the railroad tracks, and closer to the river is a paved walkway with several pedestrian bridges. I returned to the truck by way of a bicycle trail along the river. At the time of my visit, it was near dark and the Botanical Gardens closed. Rafters and Kayak enthusiasts will be interested in these photos of the river at dusk.

    Grand Junction Botanical Gardens Grand Junction Botanical Gardens Colorado River at Dusk Colorado River at Dusk Colorado River at Dusk
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    • Eco-Tourism
    • Rafting
    • Kayaking

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    Grand Junction Street Art: Moving Western End Art

    by atufft Written Aug 5, 2008

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    It becomes very apparent that the town has developed a tradition that businesses have subscribed to. Most well established businesses in town have commissioned a sculpture to decorate their store front. But, then the city's open spaces and parking areas are also decorated! In this series of images two of the large pieces are also moving art forms, while one is a bust of a baby.

    Moveable Art in Grand Junction, CO Memorial to a Baby Moving Art in Grand Junction, CO Bronze Sculpture in Grand Junction, CO Steel Flowers in Grand Junction, CO Moveable Art in Grand Junction, CO Memorial to a Baby Moving Art in Grand Junction, CO Bronze Sculpture in Grand Junction, CO Steel Flowers in Grand Junction, CO
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    McInnis CAnyons-Black Ridge CAnyons

    by BruceDunning Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    I started to drive into the BLM administered area, but back out after a short distance. There are roads that are not very good, and looked like they were getting worse as distance went on. So, I walked in a ways, but not enough to see the sites in the interior about 3 miles. These are rugged and remote parks that are not inviting to most people. The combined area of the two parks is 225 square miles and the NCA has control over the access and limits people visiting the area. If you are a "rugged" one, this remote and pristine region would be fun to hike for a couple of days, and camp

    Monument for the park entrance-a gate The sign tells it all Layout of the trail areas Rough road to traverse-NOT Good for Vehicle
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    • Horse Riding
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing

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    Old Motels

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 11, 2009

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    There are a string of old motels where the strip used to be on north Street for tourists to come and stay. A lot, if not all have survived yet, even though some may be long term stay for migrant workers and lower poverty families today. Amazingly they are still fairly well maintained, and looks like they want to compete with the chains. The 1950-60's art deco fashion look is memorable

    Row of motel sings off street Motels for you to stay
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    • Architecture

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    Glenwood Springs

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 11, 2009

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    It is a popular attraction for many people coming form Denver are, but also a number of traveling tourists. The springs is one main feature to draw people, but they also have an adventure park, a cave, thrill rides sluice box and so many other touristy things I do not want any part of. I am a more mundane who likes the outdoors and open spaces, not clustered tour traps to get money for not much fun. The Colorado runs right next to the town, and the springs are housed inside now for comfort

    Brochure of the town  east of Grand Junction
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    Museum of the West

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 10, 2009

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    This museum has an eclectic mix of history and variety. It shows the guns and weapons that were used in the 1800's. Then there is the uranium mine tour that shows how that was mined. A Pueblo dwelling depicts the times and pottery and utensils used. Then the stand out is the Sterling Smith observation tower that is maybe the highest point in town. YOu can see for miles form here.
    Admission is $5.50 adults and $1 less for seniors. Times are 10-3Pm Tuesday through Saturday.

    Entrancde of the parking lot side Looking up to the tower spire
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    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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    Botanical Gardens

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 11, 2009

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    The botanical garden is at the south end of town-by the old town center. It is on Riverside Pkwy and easy to find since this is Bus 70. The garden was colorful, and the help friendly. They have a lush green section with current flowers in bloom, then the section with shrubs of color, and a desert section for indigenous plants for the area. Entry fee is $5 and worth the short 30 minute visit

    Signage on the street front Butterfly statue flying to bush Bed of flowers in front section Desert plant section Friendly greeter to garden
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    • Photography
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Arts and Culture

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    Old Downtown

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 11, 2009

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    Grand Junction has done a very good job of reworking the old downtown area and preserving what they can so the decline is not rolling downhill too fast. They have quaint shops and places to eat. One of the more interesting notes is all the statues and sculptures there and throughout the town. Some they own, and others are on loan.

    Unique corner office building Main Grand Ave looking west to mountains Downtown shop with sculpture Sculpture in flower bed
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    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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    Colorado National Monument trails

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 11, 2009

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    There are 14 main trails in the park; some easier than others. The longest being 8 1/2 miles, while there are short jaunts of 1/2 mile. They also have 13 overlook views of various park scenes, all good for sure. I took 3 trails and ended up that day going about 12 miles in total, with McInnis CAnyon next door. UGH!, yes it is tiring.
    My calculation of Devil's Kitchen was 1 1/2 miles, and the last 1/2 mile rigorous climb up a steep huge rock face about 300 feet. Not so gradual as brochure says. You end up in middle of huge rocks and it is the kitchen

    Devils Kitchen and Serpents trails View over to the cliff edge Looking down into canyon Rock Hanging on ledge -Serpants trail Looking into cnayon off Serpents trail
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    • Desert
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing

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  • Too many to list recreation galore

    by HAZARDCOUNTY Written Apr 10, 2005

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    Westwater! 35 miles west on the Utah border - some of the best whitewater in the country. You will need a permit. Go with a local company instead. Adventurebound the premiere whitewater company runs 1 and 2 day trips through the canyon.
    Colo Nat'l Monument - so much to see and the views are awesome! Bring your camera plenty of water and hiking boots. There are many trails. Leave fido at home this place does not allow dogs - bummer.
    Tabauache trail - located at the base of the Colo Nt'l Mon - trails everywhere - hiking biking some 4-wheel drive - great local hang out and Dog Friendly!! Probably my second home.
    Powderhorn ski resort - so much snow and no lift lines - very family friendly, cheap.. 45 min from GJ on the Grand Mesa another must see place.
    Palisade - wineries and a Dog Friendly frisbee golf couse along the Colo River - too much fun.
    Downtown GJ - take a stroll- great retaurants, theatres, local art everywhere.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • National/State Park
    • Adventure Travel

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  • Biking along the Kokopelli...

    by mmspooner Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Biking along the Kokopelli trail
    Stereotyped (and others will argue as 'over-hyped') the Kokopelli trail is one of the more scenic bike rides in Colorado. It is a long 2-5 day bike ride from Fruita Colorado - all the way to Moab, Utah. The desert-like scenery can be awe-inspiring. Be forewarned that conditions can change radically and it is best to be prepared for *any* changes in temperature, precipitation, and conditions..

    Related to:
    • Cycling

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