Local traditions and culture in Colorado

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Most Viewed Local Customs in Colorado

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    POWPOW PLATTER

    by mtncorg Updated Feb 16, 2010

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    The best savings at ski resorts is always to buy a season pass, but if you are only coming for a few days .... no cost savings there! Locals can score season tickets for under $300 in some cases and these passes can be good for more than one ski area - something that is unheard of in Oregon, sadly enough.

    There used to be more special deals for the hills here in Colorado, but they seem to have dried up recently. With walk up day lift tickets costing more than $90 you need to do your research carefully. A recent online offering was given for the ski resorts run by Intrawest - Winter Prk/Mary Jane, Copper Mountain and Steamboat Springs. For $99 you can ski at one day at each of the resorts = $33 a day ... a cool savings. The online deal seems to be offered in January - at least the last two years.

    Check out other special preseason deals at the website below. Good luck!!

    21st Century Colorado Gold
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    • Skiing and Boarding

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    A brief outline of Colorado Skiing

    by OlenaKyiv Written May 28, 2007

    A brief outline of Colorado Skiing from plaque of Colorado Springs sculpture “About the End of an Era – Circa 1960”:

    “The first documented use of skies in Colorado occurred in a snowbound mining camp during the winter of 1859 – 1860 near presentday Breckenridge. Ten men left in camp made skis and traveled downvalley where they built a cabin and claimed a town site called Eldorado West. By 1911, Norwegian-born Carl Howelson introduced ski jumping in Colorado. Howelsen Hill in Steamboat Springs bears his name. Skiing grew gradually, spurred in part by the 1932 Winter Olympic held at Lake Placid, New York. By World War II, civilians convinced the War Department that mountain troops were essential to pursuing the global conflict. This effort resulted in the establishment of the elite 10th Mountain Division. The mountain troopers trained at Camp Hale, near Leadville, Colorado. The division became famous when it defeated German forces in decisive battles in the Apennine Mountains of northern Italy. Once back in civilian life, many of the former ski troopers became instrumental in the expansion of the sport. Today, Colorado’s ski resorts are leaders in the international ski industry.

    About the End of an Era ��� Circa 1960
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    Skiing equipment years ago

    by OlenaKyiv Written May 28, 2007

    From information near sculpture “About the End of an Era – Circa 1960” located near Pioneers Museum in Colorado Springs about skiing equipment century ago:

    “Pioneering skiers used a single wooden pole. By the early 1900s, tow poles were in fashion. The shafts were often made from bamboo until superior poles of a light metal alloy were developed. Higher, plastic ski boots featuring buckles marked the passing of lace-up leather boots. A leather thong anchored the heel to the ski.”

    Now we should appreciate the technology achievements that make our life so much easier and safer.

    About the End of an Era About the End of an Era
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    Colorado Springs Local People

    by Astrobuck Updated Jul 11, 2006

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    Colorado Springs in general tends to lean more towards the conservative side, while the majority of Colorado cities have a tendency to lean more liberal.

    If I could rate all of Colorado Springs's local population on a scale of 1 to 10 (1 being just downright rude, mean, and hateful; 10 being absolutely pleasant), I would have to rate it about an 6. The majority of the people I have met are very friendly, but at the same time, there are some who are just downright horrible. I'm not sure if it is the "granola complex" or what, but it is bearable. I have found the people react to you based on where you are from. For example, I am from North Carolina. Everyone is very friendly to me and very pleasant and nice. However, I have come to find out that the locals here really do not like Texans, for some odd reason. I hear it is because a lot of Texans re-locate here, and it is the "Yankee Syndrome" commonly found in the southeastern US (i.e. southerners hating northerners for moving down to live a better life...they feel like the northerners are taking over, which is true in some cases, but not all). Not sure why the locals are like this, but it is almost to the extent that it is territorial....

    In any case, don't worry about the people here. Like I said, the majority of them are nice. If you come here, enjoy yourself...you are on vacation, so don't let any of the rude locals spoil it for you.

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    Granola

    by Astrobuck Updated Apr 11, 2006

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    I have ABSOLUTELY NO IDEA as to why this is such a big deal, but I hear people from other parts of the U.S. call people from Colorado "Granola." I know it is a cereal, and it also comes in bars....(I think it's yummy, personally). It's either has something to do with Pantheism (tree spirits) or everyone here being in good shape.....

    Everyone here is very nice, and recycling centers here do pay out more to folks who decide to collect cans on the weekends, so I do know it is very ecologically friendly.

    I guess I will never know why some of the locals are called this, so I will continue to eat my Granola and be happy!

    Bowl of Granola
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  • Pronunciation

    by MandaJ320 Updated May 4, 2004

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    Most people from outside the state pronounce Colorado like "ColorOdo." But the people that live here pronounce Colorado like "ColorAdo." Also, my Grandpa lives here and he says "crik" instead of "creek." :-)

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    Native Americans in Colorado

    by goingsolo Written Mar 18, 2003

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    Though the mythology and religion of the ancient southwestern Native Americans varies from tribe to tribe, there are many similarities. Emotional attachment to the land they dwelled upon dominated their lives and religion. The homeland was the center of their universe, an no common forces of nature could impel them to leave.
    Today's Pueblo people live in the same rugged desert environment. They are there because it is their home, and they have always persistently resisted relocation by the U.S. Government. Belief in their religion and an intimate knowledge of their heritage seem to have provided the Puebloans with the strength needed to endure and enjoy such a world. These are a successful people who in early times sustained their culture. They lived with and survived Spanish culture for more than 200 years, and have also endured the stress of living with a constantly changing U.S. culture.

    Colorado
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    Tomato wars

    by goingsolo Updated Mar 18, 2003

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    Taylor Adams began the Tomato Wars in 1982 as a protest against Texans in Colorado who constantly try to change the environment of the state. Legend has it that in 1982, when Adams was still the owner of the Black Wolf Inn at Twin Lakes, a woman from Dallas, while gazing upon Mt Elbert, said: "This is a pretty area. Its a shame nobody's done anything with it." This may have been the comment which inspired the battle cry: "Keep Colorado beautiful: put a Texan on a bus."
    The tomato war contest is held in September. The battle zone varies from year to year. The rules are simple: There is an army consisting of a captain, 9 soldiers and an M.P. The soldiers carry their ammunition in plastic grocery bags strapped to their waists. The bugle sounds at noon and the Colorado soldiers charge the Texans, who usually retreat into their fort (known as the Tomalamo) and defend their fort by throwing tomatoes at a rapid pace. Soldiers hit above the torso by a tomato are considered dead and must leave the battlefield and watch from the sidelines. Although the Colorado armies often run out of ammunition, they ultimately surround the Texans fort and bring down the Lone Star flag. The process usually takes about 2 hours. After Saturdays battle, there is a shoot out on Sunday among the winning contestants.
    Some of the best strategies have included a Texan arriving by helicopter, a Coloradoan arriving by parachute and a peace march held by a dissenting army, holding signs such as "Hell No We Won't Throw" and spouting slogans that tomatoes should be used for other uses, such as bloody marys. The best strategy involved an attractive Texas female who began to undress within sight of advancing male Colorado warriors. The Coloradoans were caught off guard and ambushed.

    Colorado
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    Greeley's failed commune

    by goingsolo Updated Mar 7, 2003

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    New York Times editor Horace Greeley attempted to create a cooperative colony in west Colorado. In 1878, Nathan Meeker was appointed agent of the colony. An overly zealous man, Meeker attempted to "civilize" the Ute population in the area by educating them in the ways of the whites. Meeker even went so far as to have the Utes call him "Father Meeker." His attempts were not well received as Meeker was killed and mutilated by the tribesman he over whom he attempted to exert paternal control.

    Colorado
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    Odd Colorado laws

    by goingsolo Written Mar 6, 2003

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    One of the most interesting amendments passed in Colorado in recent years, but subsequently declared unconstitutional, was one stating that all official business must be conducted in English. It was so broadly worded that it was questionable whether lawyers could use Latin terms.

    In Ouray, it is illegal for a woman to work as a waitress or bartender in any saloon for the purpose of attracting customers.

    Also, minors can not frequent a billiard house, saloon or house of ill repute between the hours of 9 pm and 5 am

    Colorado

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    The Original Hard Rock Cafe

    by goingsolo Written Mar 6, 2003

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    The original Hard Rock Café, although not of the franchise. In 1934, the Empire Café in the town of Empire, changed its name to the Hard Rock Café, honoring the hard rock miners of the area for their patronage. The Hard Rock Café chain, est in 1971, sued the preceding Hard Rock Café restaurant for trademark infringement, and lost.

    Colorado

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    Colorado Darwin awards

    by goingsolo Written Mar 6, 2003

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    As late as the 1940's people who owned cabins in isolated regions of Colorado would leave them unlocked and stocked with food, in case a stranger would need sanctuary from a storm. Unfortunately, in the years following WWII, there were many cases of theft and vandalism to the cabins. Many owners dealt with the problem by locking their doors. But one Texan, the owner of a cabin near lake city, decided to rig a shotgun to fire at anyone who opened the door. Unfortunately for him, after leaving the cabin, he realized he'd forgotten something and went back to retrieve it. The man forgot about his new security system, opened the door and blew himself away.

    Colorado

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    Dumb Colorado LawsCar dealers...

    by photobf Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Dumb Colorado Laws
    Car dealers may not show cars on a Sunday.
    It is illegal for liquor stores to sell food or grocery stores to sell any alcohol except beer that is at most 3.2% alcohol.
    No liquor may be sold on Sundays or election days. (Repealed)
    It is illegal to ride a horse while under the influence.
    Tags may be ripped off of pillows and mattresses.
    Colorado Springs
    It is permissable to wear a holstered six-gun within city limits, except on Sunday, Election Day, or holidays.
    Crippe Creek
    It is illegal to bring your horse or pack mule above the ground floor of any building.
    Denver
    The dog catcher must notify dogs of impounding by posting, for three consecutive days, a notice on a tree in the city park and along a public road running through said park.
    It is unlawful to lend your vacuum cleaner to your next-door neighbor.
    It is illegal to mistreat rats in Denver, Colorado.
    You may not drive a black car on Sundays.
    Durango
    It is illegal to go in public dressed in clothes 'unbecoming' on one's sex.
    Logan County
    It is illegal for a man to kiss a woman while she is asleep.
    Pueblo
    It is illegal to let a dandelion grow within the city limits.
    Sterling
    Cats may not run loose without having been fit with a taillight.

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    Colorado natives are very...

    by ViolinGirl Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Colorado natives are very proud of the fact--you'll see a lot of bumper stickers attesting to it. They also get very grumpy at rude motorcyclers who tear through towns at ungodly speeds--NOT us, but the few who spoil it for everyone

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    Buy your lift tickets at...

    by american_tourister Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Buy your lift tickets at King's Soopers. This is a supermarket that will save you half the price in most cases. We got a package for Winter Park that included lift ticket and lesson for $50.00 The normal ticket is $58.00 Do the math.

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Colorado Local Customs

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