Bonita Springs Things to Do

  • Tigertail Beach
    Tigertail Beach
    by intertraveler
  • Allan at Barefoot Beach
    Allan at Barefoot Beach
    by deecat
  • Dee at Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary
    Dee at Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary
    by deecat

Most Recent Things to Do in Bonita Springs

  • intertraveler's Profile Photo

    Beaches

    by intertraveler Written May 23, 2006
    Tigertail Beach

    Tigertail beach as a car park and a toilets.

    It is very picturest and and not overcrowded and you get a good view of Marco Island.
    The sand is white and fine a gorgeous tropical beach well worth a visit

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  • deecat's Profile Photo

    Barefoot Beach Preserve, A Beach Paradise

    by deecat Updated Jun 4, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Allan at Barefoot Beach

    Barefoot Beach Preserve is a 342 acre barrier island separated from the mainland by mangrove swamps and tidal creeks. This area is bordered on the West by almost two miles of Gulf beach that terminates at Wiggins Pass to the South.

    Sadly, it is one of the last stretches of undeveloped beachfront lands in South Florida. It remains as natural and as unspoiled as it appeared hundreds of years ago.

    It's a great place to hunt for shells, walk the beach, rent a beach tent ($15 per day) and read, swim in the Gulf, fish, or just relax.

    The Friends of Barefoot Beach Preserve was organized in 1990 by Leon & Naida Eisenbud and Bobbe Hickman to preserve the Ospreys. It has grown each year since then.

    It is a non-profit organization with about 400 members thats purpose is to preserve, protect, and enhance the natural environment. They also foster educational and research endeavors. They sponsor the following:

    1. A beautiful Learning Center
    2. Saturday morning lecture series
    3. A mile-long back trail
    4. A beautiful aquatic garden for butterflies
    5. A xeriscape (dry garden)
    6. Ongoing study of the population and
    habitat of the gopher tortoise
    7. Bird Sanctuar with nests for Ospreys and
    Purple Martins
    8. Assist the County with beach cleanup

    It's more than just a beach. The experience at Barefoot Preserve includes:
    a. Friends Learning Center
    b. Aquatic Butterfly Garden
    c. Saturday Lecture Series
    d. The Nature Trail
    e. Sand Dunes
    f. Mangrove Forest

    It's an experience you won't soon forget!

    Related to:
    • Fishing
    • Beaches
    • Adventure Travel

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    Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary

    by deecat Updated Jun 4, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Dee at Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary

    Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary is owned and operated by the NATIONAL AUDUBON SOCIETY. It is acclaimed as the crown jewel of the Audubon's sanctuaries.

    Audubon first saw Corkscrew in 1912 when wardens were dispatched to protect egrets and other birds from plume hunters. Then in the 1950's, Audubon bought the land to protect the cypress forest from loggers. Today, Audubon is involved with restoring the Everglades and preserving the watershed so Southwest Florida and its wildlife will have a healthy ecosystem.

    We visited the Sanctuary on a sunny morning in January when the temperature was in the 70's. It was a perfect day. We saw pristine wilderness that dates back more than 500 years!

    To see upclose, we walked the 2.25 mile boardwalk that meandered through open prairie, pine flatwoods, and the largest forest of ancient bald cypress in North America. Some of these impressive trees towered 130 feet intothe air and were 25 feet around.

    There are almost 200 bird species here. We saw egret, ibis, heron, woodpeckers, hawks, and dozens of wood storks

    The water in Corkscrew is a slow moving river that flows to the southwest toward the Gulf of Mexico. Plants and trees help to filter the water and that keeps the water sweet and clear and without mosquito larvae!

    Open daily
    April 11 thru September 30
    7 a.m. - 7:30 p.m.

    October 1 thru April 10
    7 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

    Admission:
    Adults $8.00
    Students 5.50
    Audubon
    Members 5.00
    Children
    6-18 3.50
    under 6 free

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Eco-Tourism

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Bonita Springs Things to Do

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