Unique Places in Florida

  • View from the observation tower
    View from the observation tower
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    coral castle
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    St. George St-the main avenue
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Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Florida

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    Kingsley Plantation

    by KimberlyAnn Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Located on Fort George Island, and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Kingsley Plantation is a post Civil War era plantation that produced cotton, citrus, sugar cane, and corn. This historic plantation is an easy drive from Little Talbot Island State Park. Zephaniah Kingsley became a wealthy landowner, eventually owning more than 32,000 acres of land, and four major plantations with more than 200 slaves. Interestingly, his wife, Anna Madgigine Jai, was a Senegal, West African slave that Kingsley purchased, and then later married. She was actively involved in the management of the plantation. In 1811 he gave Anna Jai her freedom, and she then acquired her own land and owned slaves herself. Kingsley also placed a slave, Abraham Hanahan, in place as his plantation manager, and during times that Kingsley was away, Hanahan was completely in charge. Kingsley later freed Hanahan. Later when Florida enacted additional restrictive laws that caused even more repression of blacks, both free and slaves, Kingsley and his family moved to Haiti to escape what he felt was a spirit of intolerant prejudice. In Haiti he established a colony for his family and some of his former slaves. On your visit you will visit the home of the Kingsley’s, the kitchen house, the garden area, a tabby barn, and the ruins of the tabby slave quarters. Tabby was an oyster shell concrete used in many coastal plantations. See my second photo for a view of a tabby slave quarter.

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    Collier-Seminal State Park

    by KimberlyAnn Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Located near the Naples, Florida area, Collier Seminole State Park has the varied vegetation and wildlife of the Everglades. Its tropical hardwood hammock is similar to that of the coastal forest areas of the West Indies and the Yucatan Peninsula. This is an area where the royal palm tree, rare in the wild, may be seen in its natural habitat. Some of the animals you may see are pelican, wood storks, bald eagles, woodpeckers, alligators, manatees, and squirrels. Black Bears, panthers, and crocodiles also live in the park, but are rarely seen.

    Activities that can be enjoyed in the park are camping, bird watching, hiking, canoeing, fishing, and bicycling. The park also offers boat tours. These tours take you along the Black Water River. Your guide will tell you about the early settlers in the area, as well as telling you about the wildlife and plants in the Everglades environment. There is a boat ramp for launching your own boats, and canoe rentals are available in the park.

    Collier-Seminole Park is located on U.S. 41, 17 miles south of Naples.

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    Best Bay Sunset

    by TequilaTom Written Nov 9, 2010

    When traveling the South Bay area of Tampa (Hillsborough County), take time to view the spectacular sunsets from Little Harbor in Ruskin. Tricky to find from US 41, but well worth it. Great views of St. Pete skyline after dark and even a local can imagine they are far from home while sipping libations at the Tiki Bar and listening to live music.

    Destination is at the end of Shell Point Rd. and was to be one of the hottest areas for waterfront developement before the RE bubble. Great food, daily specials, live bands Thurs. - Sat. and the best deal for for weekend breakfast buffet on the water!

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    A day in the Bahamas

    by csordila Written Jun 3, 2009

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    A one day cruise provides you to enjoy everything a longer cruise offers in one day for a fraction of the cost. It is also the best way to travel to Freeport Grand Bahamas.
    Grand Bahama considered the second most popular island in the Bahamas, and its major city, Freeport, is regarded as the nation’s second city.
    You get a breakfast and lunch buffet on your way to Grand Bahama and dinner on your return trip to south Florida. There is also lots of live entertainment and a Las Vegas style casino onboard. The liner is basically a hotel on water.
    On arrival you can take a $25 dollar tour around Freeport, then come some shopping, drinking, catching sun on the beach (access through the Sheraton), and your time went by. With some good weather the trip makes you an awesome one day fun!

    And by the way, how else can you get to the Grand Bahama with fun, food and drink for a fraction of the normal cost?

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    Paynes Prairie- where the buffalo.... roam?

    by goingsolo Written Dec 28, 2008

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    You may not have known that there are bison in Florida. You may not care either, and, if that is the case, then feel free to stop reading this tip.

    I'd highly recommend this one if you're in the area. Its hard to believe that, 20 minutes or so from the fast food and motel sprawl of Gainesville lies a flat prairie land, which is sometimes dry and sometimes flooded. Where American Bison roam free and white tail deer prance around in the forest. All of this in Florida!

    Paynes Prairie, one of the most unusual landscapes in Florida, contains a small population of bison who freely roam the prairie land just outside of Gainesville. Paynes is a spectacular state park filled with white tail deer, hiking and horse trails, and, if you're lucky, a glimpse at an American Bison. Unfortunately, I didn't get to see one, but did come across several deer. I also hiked through the forested and marshy areas also found in the park.

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    Torreya State Park

    by goingsolo Written Dec 1, 2008

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    For those of you who think Florida is completely flat, well, you are almost correct. But if you think the state is all beaches and shopping malls, well, you've got that one wrong. Torreya State Park is located in Northwest Florida, about 60 miles west of Tallahassee. Known for its "high" (300 foot) bluffs, rare torreya trees and lush forests, this out of the way location is a must see for those who want to visit "teh real Florida"

    For more information, feel free to browse my Torreya State Park page.

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    Billie Swamp Safari

    by davesut Updated May 5, 2008

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    This is s great place. Along the Alligator alley you'll find signs for Billie Swamp's Safari, head north. The safari, air boat rides and animals give a side to Florida that you should take the time to see. Aparantly profits go to the Seminole Community.

    Still can't get the pictures right.

    Back to Davesut's home page

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    Topsail Hill Preserve State Park

    by KimberlyAnn Updated Mar 23, 2008

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    We visited Topsail Hill Preserve State Park as a day trip from our campground in nearby Grayton Beach State Park. Topsail is another beautiful state preserve located along the Gulf of Mexico. Like all the other state parks in what is called the Emerald Coast, the sand is sugar white, and the beaches are pristine, with water that often takes on an emerald green look. The preserve has more than three and a half miles of sand beaches, and tall dunes, some standing over twenty-five feet high. See photo 2 for a view of the dunes, and photo 3 for a view of the white, sandy beach. There are also a number of freshwater dune lakes that are excellent for shore fishing. If you are a birdwatcher, or enjoy hiking, take a walk along the Morris Lake Nature Trail as it winds for two and a half miles through ancient dunes, old-growth long leaf pines, sand pine scrub, and a variety of wetlands. Photo 4 will show you a view of the area that leads through the pine forest section of this hike, and photo 5 is a photo I took at Morris Lake. For a longer hike, take the Campbell Lake Nature Trail, which again leads you through a variety of habitats. Or walk along miles of abandoned jeep trails, where you can no longer drive vehicles, but which will offer you another option for exploring the park on foot.

    We did not camp in Topsail, and I did not take the time to check out the accommodations, so I am unfamiliar with what they look like. There is an RV resort complete with a swimming pool, tennis courts, and shuffleboard courts. This resort also has cabins available for weekly stays. Since this is a resort style campground, it is more expensive than the average state park campgrounds. For more information about camping at Topsail, visit the website below.

    The park is located in Santa Rosa Beach on Route 30A.

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    Grayton Beach State Park

    by KimberlyAnn Updated Mar 22, 2008

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    Sitting on the Gulf of Mexico, Grayton Beach State Park is another beautiful park located along the panhandle of Florida near the town of Grayton Beach on S.R. 30-A, south of U.S. 98. The tall dunes along this white sand beach are beautiful, with sea oats, and a few vines running over them. You will find boardwalks that will allow you to access this lovely beach without damaging the protected sand dunes. See photo 2 for an example of how the sand is always shifting, as it begins to fill in the base of one of these ramps. I enjoyed walking the beach, watching seabirds, and just sitting quietly while listening to the rhythmic sound of the waves. This is also a nice location to watch the evening sunsets. After dark, we took walks along the beach, where using our flashlights we saw a lot of ghost crabs scurrying around on the water’s edge and into the surf.

    For exploring the park, there is a four and a half mile trail that you can either hike or bike. This trail will lead you through a pine flatwoods. There is also a one-mile nature trail that will take you through a coastal forest habitat with pine flatwoods, scrub, and sand dunes. Stop in at the Ranger Station to pickup a self-guiding pamphlet that will give you interesting information about this hike.

    Besides enjoying the beach and the hiking trails, many visitors enjoy fishing. Another popular activitiy is canoeing or kayaking on the Western Lake, where you can explore a salt marsh ecosystem. A boat ramp is located on the lake to provide you with access to this lake.

    If you are coming to the park for a day outing, there is a large picnic pavilion with a view of the Gulf of Mexico where you may enjoy eating a prepared lunch that you have brought to the park with you.

    If you would like to stay in the park, campgrounds and cabins are available for visitors. The campgrounds have water and electricity. The cabins will accommodate up to six people, and are located in the pinewoods, with only a short walk to the beach. Reservations may be made up to 11 months ahead of time by calling Reserve America at 1-800-326-3521.

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    Apalachicola, a Small Town

    by KimberlyAnn Updated Mar 16, 2008

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    Apalachicola, Florida, harvests more than 80% of the state’s oysters, and 10% of the nation’s. Valued for its unspoiled natural environment, you will find miles of pristine beaches, as well as protected shallow bays, where fishing is a popular sport. To enjoy some of the beautiful beaches and unspoiled environments of the area, visit St. George Island State Park.

    Be sure to enjoy fresh seafood and fish in one of its restaurants, or purchase your own at one of the fish markets. Photo 3 shows my husband purchasing fresh seafood from a trailer set up along the road between the state park and the town. This entrepreneur has his own shrimp boat, and goes out each night to fish, then sells his fresh catch the next day from his small trailer. That is about as fresh as you can buy it. We purchased such items as slipper lobster tails, oysters, shrimp, and grouper.

    A historic area you may enjoy visiting is the Orman House State Park. This antebellum home was built in 1838 by Thomas Orman, and overlooks the Apalachicola River. Orman used his home for both business and social gatherings. A cotton merchant and businessman in early Apalachicola, he helped the town to become one of the Gulf Coast’s most important cotton exporting ports in the mid-19th century. The wood for this two-story home was cut near Syracuse, New York, and shipped to Apalachicola by sailboat. The downstairs bedroom has an oak floor, and the kitchen has a cherry floor. The steps leading to the front porch are of granite. The Orman House is located in Apalachicola at 177 5th Street. For more information on the Orman House, visit www.floridastateparks.org/ormanhouse/default.cfm

    If you like boats, take a walk along the marina area, which is filled with working fishing and shrimp boats. My main tip photo shows one of the boats docked here. Photo 2 is a photo I took in the same area of fishnets hanging out to dry.

    We also enjoyed the National Estuarine Research Reserve. This research reserve studies such things as commercial fisheries management, and monitors water quality. This researach reserve is located in nearby Eastpoint, Florida, and is one of the largest Estuaarine Research labs in the United States. You will find a small exhibit here with live fish tanks housed in their educational center. You can also view a film giving you information about the area. A short boardwalk gives you the opportunity to walk into the cypress tree swamp and over into a prairie with estuary water in the background. For more information about the Estuarine Researach Reserve, visit www.dep.state.fl.us/coastal/sites/apalachicola/info.htm

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    St. George Island State Park

    by KimberlyAnn Updated Mar 16, 2008

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    St. George Island State Park is one of the best examples of Florida’s Gulf Coast barrier islands, with nine miles of undeveloped white sandy beach, small ponds, protected sand dunes, and grassy flats. This park is bordered by the Gulf of Mexico and Apalachicola Bay. Enjoy the beach, fly a kite, fish, hike, camp, boat, enjoy bird watching, and watch for bottlenose dolphins swimming off shore. The park has two boat ramps and if you enjoy canoeing and kayaking, these may be rented on the island. There are six picnic areas with grills, tables, and bathrooms. There is also a campground with 60 electric and water sites, as well as primitive campsites. The main campground has showers available for campers. If you enjoy hiking, take the Gap Point Trail that starts at the campground and leads into the pine flat wood forest and takes you to the bay. We saw a bald eagle’s nest with an adult eagle sitting in a near-by tree. When we reached the bay, we found the tide was out, and we saw thousands of small crab holes and mounds, as well as various sizes of raccoon footprints in the sand. I bet this is a favorite night time feeding area for raccoons. In the evening we could hear frogs from the campground, and when we walked down the road to a small pond, it sounded like hundreds of frogs, it was so LOUD. I shown my flashlight across the pond but could not see one frog, and the light itself didn’t even interrupt their calls. It was a clear, moonless night, exposing the millions of bright stars that crowd the night sky. They seem even closer together here than in the northern states where I live. See photo 2 for a close-up view of the vegetation along the dunes.

    Directions: The park is located on St. George Island, ten miles southeast of Eastpoint, off of U.S. 98. The address is 1900 E. Gulf Beach Dr., St. George Island, Florida 32328. To access the island you will drive across a long bridge, drive past sand dunes and ocean side residences to the park gate, and then it will be another four miles to reach the campground.

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    Manatee Springs State Park

    by KimberlyAnn Updated Mar 15, 2008

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    Located six miles west of Chiefland, the crown jewel of Manatee Springs State Park is it springs, with its crystal clean, and beautifully colored water. (see photo 4) Manatee Springs produced 81,280 gallons of water every minute, and 116.9 million gallons a day that flows from the springs into the Suwannee River. The water around the mouth of the spring is a beautiful turquoise blue, and a lighter hue of this color remains with the water as it flows past a swamp of cypress, gum, ash, and maple trees toward the river. The park includes hammock and sand hill communities, as well as the water that flows from the springs, and the Suwannee River. This is a good park for wildlife viewing, and you may see many birds, white-tailed deer, and manatee. The manatee, an endangered species in Florida, can often be seen around the mouth of the water run in cooler winter months. It is the warm water, a constant 72 degrees, that draws the manatees to this springs. Come to the park to enjoy camping, canoeing, and fishing. There is also an eight and a half mile trail system for biking and hiking. You may swim in the springs, when the protected manatees are not present. When the manatees are present, you can enjoy observing them from the boardwalk at the springs. The best months to view the manatee are January through April.

    When we were visiting we took a number of walks along the board walk that is adjacent to the spring run where we had a wonderful view of the cypress, adorned with Spanish moss, along with the other types of trees, tiny yellow flowers, and the knees of the cypress jutting up and texturing the landscape. (see photo 3) A family of deer fed nearby, and squirrels scampered about. We saw many black vultures sitting in the trees along the Suwannee River, and stopped to watch an egret as he fished along the spring runoff area. (see photo 2) Although we never spotted any manatee in the springs, on one of our walks we spotted at least four or five manatee at the end of the boardwalk.

    The campground has sites that are located in a hammock area of oaks, magnolias, and hickory trees. There are restrooms, water, picnic tables, and ground grills in the campground. Electricity is also available.

    Address: Manatee Springs State Park, 11650 N.W. 115th St. Chiefland, Florida 32626

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    Fakahatchee Strand State Park

    by KimberlyAnn Updated Mar 15, 2008

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    Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park is located west of Copeland, Florida, and is part of the Big Cypress and Everglade swamp areas. Make your first stop at Big Cypress Bend, where you can walk a lovely, 2000 foot boardwalk. This boardwalk takes you into one of the last stands of old-growth cypress forest, and ends at a small pond. This pond was just bubbling with small fish the day we visited it. There was a blue heron and a couple of great white egrets, as well as a wood stork (see photo 3) that were eating their fill of these fish. We spotted a catbird, little blue heron, and an ibis up an estuary. A red shouldered hawk sat in a near-by tree, and small snakes, lizards, and frogs, and alligators went about their business or lay in the mud. We watched an amazing struggle for life as a small Florida garter snake, whose head was poking out of a hollow log, was slowly swallowing a poor, struggling frog, which was screaming pitifully. Near-by a two foot garter snake that was resting on the muddy bank was attracted to the cry of the desperate frog. Turning, he moved quickly toward the other snake, which sensed the danger, and quickly retreated back inside his log, releasing the frog, which took one big spring to freedom, only to be instantly swallowed down by an alligator. This walk is particularly nice in November through March, when you may see a number of wildflowers, including native orchids. You may also see a variety of butterflies, as well as birds, mammals, and reptiles. The park calls itself the Amazon of North America. This preserve is a swamp forest that is twenty miles long and five miles wide. Besides the wet swamps, you will also find prairies, hardwood hammocks, and pine lands. This is the only place in the world where bald cypress trees and royal palms share the forest. After Big Cypress Bend, if you have more time drive the 11 mile, unpaved and gravel Jane’s Scenic Drive that follows S.R. 29. This will take you into the preserve, where you can stop along the way for a true wild swamp adventure, on foot, along the built up paths that run throughout the preserve to allow rangers access the interior. These are great for walking on. One of our stops was at Gate number 12 where we took a wonderful walk with swamp on both sides, and the magnificent Royal Palms rising above everything else. As we walked we saw a red shouldered hawk fly up from the swamp with a small snake, which he carried to a nearby tree and began to eat. Gate number 16 was the most jungle like place we have ever been.

    You will find people on the wonderful boardwalk at Big Cypress Bend, but if you walk the backcountry you will be alone. (see photo 2)

    I love hiking in Fakahatchee Strand State Preserve, however, beware of those mounds you see on the ground that look like ant hills, they may really be wasp mounds. Also watch out for poison ivy. We saw a lot of both when we walked the path from gate 16. Luckily I didn’t step in any!

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    St. Joseph State Park

    by KimberlyAnn Updated Mar 14, 2008

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    St. Joseph Peninsula State Park has pristine white sand beaches, emerald waters, and sandy pine scrub backcountry, providing you with many places to explore. This beautiful beach is bordered by some of the oldest and highest sand dunes in Florida. These dunes, are protected, so to access the beach, you will use boardwalks that have been built to carry you over the dunes. Do not walk on these dunes, as studies have shown that dunes like this help to protect the park. St. Joseph’s is an excellent park for bird watching, as well as fishing, hiking, swimming, flying kites, boating, camping, or just enjoying the beach. St. Joseph Peninsula Park has three nature trails. The Maritime Hammock Trail will lead you through a coastal hammock to the shores of the St. Joseph Bay. The Bayview Nature Trail passes through a maritime oak and salt marsh environment, running along side the bay. A seven mile long Wilderness trail begins at the end of the paved road and will take you to the tip of the peninsula. (See Photo 3) We really enjoyed the Bayview Trail where we saw thousands of fiddler crabs scurrying back and fourth along the route. I believe some were mating as we would see a male extend his huge claw high into the air, and wave it back and fourth. Then a female came quite close to him. They stood eyeing each other face to face. We also saw a crab that decided he wanted the hole of another. A short sparring match where the two crabs knocked their large claws together, ended when the original holder of the hole scurried out, abandoning it to the victor who immediately took up occupancy.

    If you wish to bring a boat to the park there is a boat ramp and a small marina, which can hold a few small boats at a time. Overnight visitors have free use of the boat ramp, and if there is space, can leave their boats moored at the marina. If you are not staying over in the park then there is a small fee for using the ramp.

    St. Joseph Peninsula has two campgrounds with a total of 119 campsites, all with water and electricity. It also offers eight cabins that can sleep up to seven people in each. Each cabin has a screened in porch with a picnic table and rocking chairs that faces St. Joseph Bay.

    Directions: The park is located between Port St. Joe, and Apalachicola on Cape San Blas Road, off C-30.

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    Big Cypress National Preserve

    by KimberlyAnn Written Mar 11, 2008

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    Although this is a National Preserve, and is near Everglades National Park, it is not as developed, and not as heavily visited. I have seen the largest alligators here and along the Tamiami Trail (highway 41). As usual, when we went we were camping, and we stayed in the park’s Monument Lake Campground. This campground is located on a small lake. As soon as we stepped out of the truck we saw two small, 5 foot alligators swimming along. This is definitely gater country. Along with the alligators there are venomous snakes, which along with the gators are protected by federal law. Poison ivy and poison wood are also plentiful in the hammocks, so be sure you know what these look like. Big Cypress National Preserve is a large wilderness of swamp land and sandy islands. The park gets its name from the cypress tress that covers one third of the park. Although the preserve does protect the environment, unlike most preserves his park does allow some hunting and fishing according to federal and state regulations. There also off-road trails for ATVs and 4x4s. There are 31 miles of trail that will take you through varied vegetation. These trails, however, do contain wet areas from ankle to waist deep water in the rainy season. Canoe trails are also laied out that will take you about 5 to 6 hours to paddle. Check at the Visitor Center for more information. Bicycling can be done along the limerock trails, but off-road vehicles and hikers also use these. This is a very remote park, and services are limited, so be sure to fill your gas tank, and stock up on food before coming in. We took the scenic drive loop that comes off of US 41 and follows highway 94. It is mainly unpaved, and passes through the cypress swamp. We stopped at a short Hammock Nature Trail and walked the narrow trail through the jungle like vegetation. We also pulled off the road in various places to look into the swamp. Beautiful air plants dressed the area with their pretty red flowers, and wee saw fish and many gators, as well as swamp lilies. (see photo 2) We were also lucky to spot an otter as he crossed the road in front of us. The next day we took a second scenic drive where we saw large turtles, raptors, anhingas, cormorants, snowy egrets, great egrets, little blue herons, blue herons, tri-colored herons, wood storks, ibis, gallinules, and turkey vultures, plus lots of alligators. You will want to begin your exploration at the Big Cypress Visitor Center. This is 20 miles east of Ochopee on US 41.

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