J.N. Ding Darling Refuge, Sanibel Island

4.5 out of 5 stars 18 Reviews

1 Wildlife Drive 239 472 1100

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • ding darling national wildlife refuge
    ding darling national wildlife refuge
    by doug48
  • backlit spoonbills bit washed out but still pretty
    backlit spoonbills bit washed out but...
    by zrim
  • White Ibis
    White Ibis
    by catalysta
  • catalysta's Profile Photo

    The Birth Of A Wildlife Refuge

    by catalysta Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Baby Raccoon

    He and his cohorts managed to make an arrangement with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service to lease 2200 acres of mangrove wetlands longterm, forming the Sanibel Island National Wildlife Refuge. Upon his death in 1962, trustees of the conservation foundation that had been formed in his name move to solidify their tenuous grip on these precious wetlands. Finally in 1967, the lands were placed under federal ownership, and thus was formed the J. N. "Ding" Darling National Wildlife Refuge.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Birdwatching
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • catalysta's Profile Photo

    Today In Ding Darling

    by catalysta Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Willets

    Today the refuge on Sanibel is over 5200 acres in size, and still supported by the volunteer organization, "Ding" Darling Wildlife Society. It receives over 1 million visitors per year, and is one of the most popular wildlife refuges in North America.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Birdwatching
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • catalysta's Profile Photo

    Getting Around The Refuge

    by catalysta Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    White Ibis

    It's wonderfully accessible to all, no matter whether you can hike around or not. For those who are too tired or unable to hike it due to disabilites, you can ride the tramway and get a narrated tour. For the more audacious, you can rent a canoe or kayak from Tarpon Bay Explorers to paddle around the mangrove swamps. Drive the famous 5 mile Wildlife Drive, or bicycle it, or walk it, and take any number of side trail hikes if you wish. Search for the one resident American Crocodile (she has no mate, but comes here every year to lay her eggs).

    Related to:
    • Birdwatching
    • National/State Park
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • catalysta's Profile Photo

    Mystery Bird

    by catalysta Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mystery Bird

    Now this was our Mystery Bird for the day, since all we saw of it was the silhouette on a branch you are viewing here. Too big for a crow, tail too stubby for anything else we could think of. But finally we figured out that it's a Green Heron. What a relief!

    Related to:
    • Birdwatching
    • National/State Park
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • catalysta's Profile Photo

    Who was Ding Darling??

    by catalysta Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Friendly Osprey

    J. N. "Ding" Darling was a Pullitzer Prize winning editorial cartoonist from Iowa. But his most famous and lasting legacy was begun in the early 1940's, when he became the champion of Sanibel Island's natural treasures. Darling spearheaded the efforts of conservationists to save the fragile mangrove and estuarial habitats on the island from development. (Link for Ding Darling Refuge: http://www.ding-darling.org/wildlife.html)

    Related to:
    • Birdwatching
    • National/State Park
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • catalysta's Profile Photo

    Waders

    by catalysta Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Waders

    Small wonder, when you see the fantastic array of birds, from Roseate Spoonbills to Anhingas to Blue-Winged Teals to Ospreys, and all manner of Little Brown Birds besides! This shot captured an Immature Little Blue Heron, a Double-Crested Cormorant, a Willet & a Gull wading the mudflats in search of breakfast.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • National/State Park
    • Birdwatching

    Was this review helpful?

  • catalysta's Profile Photo

    The Flasher

    by catalysta Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    GBH Flasher

    Has anyone ever seen a Great Blue Heron in this pose before, for all the world like a flasher with his coat open? He stood this way for quite a while, and none of our little group had ever seen one in that pose before.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Birdwatching
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • catalysta's Profile Photo

    Reddish Egret

    by catalysta Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Reddish Egret

    This lovely Reddish Egret was just a little too far away for me to get a clear picture. It was doing the typical "canopy feeding" behavior for the most part, moving too quickly darting after the fish for me to capture it with the ever-annoying digital lag issue.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Birdwatching
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • catalysta's Profile Photo

    Black & Rose

    by catalysta Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Black & rose

    I was trying out the digital zoom feature on my camera - something I've never used before & will never use again! So darned if this didn't come out too blurry, and it should've been a beautiful shot. Wanted to re-shoot it, but the Spoonbill got tired of waiting for me to fumble around, and it flew off to parts unknown. The Double-Crested Cormorant was a bit more obliging, but not quite so photogenic without his friend.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Birdwatching
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • Rhondaj's Profile Photo

    J.N. "Ding" Darling National Wildlife Refuge

    by Rhondaj Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    high jumper

    The name of this place is a mouthful isn't it? The locals must have a shorter one...

    Way, WAY too hot to walk the trail here in the summer. Take Wildlife Drive instead. You'll go past tidal mudflats, mangrove forests, and a small tropical forest. You'll see a ton of birds! Sadly, there were very few pelicans about. We were told it is because of the red tide that came and killed off so many fish, the pelicans food source. So most of them went elsewhere.

    Didn't see any alligators either. They say winter is a better time to spot them.

    The gate to the wildlife center generally opens one half hour after sunrise and closes one half hour before sunset. (I don't think you want to get locked in this place at night!)

    The entrance fee is $5.00 per car, or $1.00 if you're hiking or biking in.

    The education center is open 9-5 Nov. through April and 9-4 in the simmering summer.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Birdwatching

    Was this review helpful?

  • tpangelinan's Profile Photo

    Save a whole day for this adventure!

    by tpangelinan Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    South Florida at it finest

    National Wildlife Refuge
    in 1945 over 6400 achres were established as a Refuge. See West Indian Manatee, Roseate Spoonbill, Wood Storks and Bald Eagles in their natural habitat.
    Guided tram service, nature trails, hiking, kayak, canoe launch, birdwatching, photography, biking, auto tour ($5.00), walking tour ($1.00).

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Eco-Tourism

    Was this review helpful?

  • Aussie666's Profile Photo

    Ding Darling Wildlife Refuge

    by Aussie666 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of many wildlife sights

    We take a trip through the refuge on every visit to the area and are always rewarded with beautiful, tranquil scenery. Go canoeing through the mangroves on a marked trail and bring you fishing gear/camera.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism

    Was this review helpful?

  • doug48's Profile Photo

    j.n. "ding" darling national wildlife refuge

    by doug48 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    ding darling national wildlife refuge

    after sanibel island's beautiful beaches the ding darling national wildlife refuge is one of the most visited attractions in sanibel. the refuge was created in 1945 and is named after j.n. "ding" darling who was instrumenal in saving this part of sanibel island from development. this 6,400 acre refuge has mangrove forest, cordgrass marsh, and hardwood hammock ecosystems. this refuge is an excellent place to bird watch.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Beaches

    Was this review helpful?

  • WanderingAimlessly's Profile Photo

    Bird Watcher's Paradise

    by WanderingAimlessly Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A small alligator at the Ding Darling Preserve.

    If you ever get the chance to go to the Ding Darling Refuge, especially during low tide, take it.

    It offers: a Visitor Center, a 5-mile auto tour route, fresh and salt water fishing, hiking trails, tram service, canoe and kayak rentals, guided interpretive programs, a wildlife observation tower and tons of wildlife photography opportunities (there are plenty of places to stop and get out of your car to take pictures.) Be sure to take suntan lotion, bug repellant and some bottled water with you if you visit. There is a small fee for the 5-mile auto tour.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Birdwatching

    Was this review helpful?

  • zrim's Profile Photo

    See the Spoonbills

    by zrim Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    backlit spoonbills bit washed out but still pretty

    I had seen most, if not all, of the larger species of birds that inhabit south Florda--all, except for the rosette spoonbill. I desperately wanted to see the spoonbill. So I contacted my buddy Bob (tropicdiver) and asked where I was most likely to see the spoonbills. Bob said, without hesitation, "You are virtually guarenteed to see spoonbills at the Darling Preserve on Sanibel Island." So I went. And I did see spoonbills. They were all backlit by the setting sun, but I did see them. Hurrah.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Birdwatching

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Sanibel Island

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

98 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near J.N. Ding Darling Refuge
4.5 out of 5 stars
2.4 miles away
4.5 out of 5 stars
2 Reviews
2.4 miles away
Show Prices
4.0 out of 5 stars
2.4 miles away
Show Prices

View all Sanibel Island hotels