Andersonville Travel Guide

  • Entering the north gate of the Andersonville camp
    Entering the north gate of the...
    by Ewingjr98
  • Andersonville National Cemetery
    Andersonville National Cemetery
    by Ewingjr98
  • The town of Andersonville
    The town of Andersonville
    by Ewingjr98

Andersonville Things to Do

  • There Ain't No Red Clay in Georgia

    In some areas of Georgia, the soil is a strikingly red colored clay. This red hued dirt is caused mainly by the presence of iron oxides in the soil. They say red clay is found in soils that are in very wet environments and are well drained, so many of the other minerals leach out of the rocks, leaving mainly iron oxides. Georgia's red clay has...

    more
  • Pecans

    Pecans, or pee cans, if you are from Georgia, are a Georgia tradition. Georgia produces more pee cans than any other state in the US, and it has led the states in pee can production since the 1800s. But for some reason, pecans are the state nut of Alabama, pecan pie is part of the state meal of Oklahoma, and pecans are the official "state health...

    more
  • Walking in High Cotton!

    The area around Andersonville is prime cotton country in Georgia. We drove for a bit, then started seeing small cotton balls blowing around, then twigs with cotton still on them, then fields with piles of cotton waste, and finally big white bales of cotton sitting on the sides of red clay fields. Georgia's best cotton producing region is in the...

    more
  • Stockade Branch Creek, Andersonville...

    The Stockade Branch was intended to be the water supply for all of the prisoners in the Andersonville Camp. Looking at this small stream today, one wonders how this could provide enough water for 300 people, let alone the 30,000 that were in the camp at its peak. The stockade walls blocked the flow of the water, creating a polluted swamp that was...

    more
  • Andersonville National Cemetery

    Andersonville National Cemetery was established in 1864, initially as a burial spot for those who died at the prison camp nearby. The dead from the prison were buried in long trenches sometimes with several thousand bodies buried in a single grave trench. Nearly 13,000 deceased prisoners are buried here, and in later years, another 7,000 veterans...

    more
  • Ghosts of Andersonville

    I'm not a big believer in ghosts, but I saw my first good evidence at Andersonville. I arrived and took numerous photos around the prison camp site before my camera started doing odd things. My photos started to appear slightly washed out. Then we made our way tot he cemetery, and my photos became more and more washed out, almost completely white....

    more
  • Providence Spring

    The civil war camp at Andersonville was built alongside a stream that would provide fresh water for the inmates. That was until the stream was blocked by the walls of the stockade, creating a stagnant, polluted swamp in the middle of the camp. As the summers progressed, the stream because a small trickle of water, nowhere near enough to provide...

    more
  • The town of Andersonville

    Andersonville, Georgia is a tiny town with just 250 or so permanent residents. The town's main claim to fame (or infamy) is the nearby Andersonville Prisoner of War Camp and National Cemetery. The town began as a railroad station and expanded when Camp Sumter opened (which eventually became the prisoner of war camp). In the 1970s the town's mayor...

    more
  • The Monuments of Andesonville

    Ansdersonville has a number of monuments, both at the cemetery and at the prison site. Most were dedicated by states to recognize the soldiers and units from that state, but others recognize individuals and some others were donated by private organizations like the Odd Fellows.The first monument at the Andersonville cemetery site was placed in 1899...

    more
  • Andersonville's North Gate

    Andersonville prison had two entrances on the west side, facing the town of Andersonville and its train station. Of the two entrances, only the north gate has been reconstructed. The only other section of the stockade reconstructed is the northeast corner. The gate was a square of tall, 20 foot walls with two doors, one ot the outside world and one...

    more
  • Andersonville's "Dead Line"

    The dead line marked the prisoners' limits within the walls of the Andersonville Camp compound. A simple wooden fence marked the dead line, and it was enforced by sentries in towers located about every 90 feet along the walls. If a prisoner crossed the fence, he was shot and killed, hence the name "dead line." The deadline was located 19 feet from...

    more
  • andersonville train depot

    pictured is the train depot were the union prisoners of war disembarked for their internment at camp sumter. from this point they were marched a quarter mile to the prison. today the depot houses the andersonville visitor center.

    more
  • star fort

    on a hill overlooking camp sumter capt.wirz built the star fort. the fort was so named because it was in the shape of a star. in reality it is just an earthen embankment which wirz aimed cannons at the camp. in terms of prison guards, camp sumter was extremely under staffed so wirz needed additional force to deal with the possibility of a mass...

    more
  • camp sumter

    pictured is a replica of camp sumter's prison wall, guard towers, and the prisoner's make shift shelters. this corner of the prison gives the visitor an impression of how primative the living conditions of the prisoners were. capt. henry wirz, the comandant of camp sumter was given very little supplies in order to construct adequate shelter for the...

    more
  • camp sumter

    pictured is the small creek that runs through the center of camp sumter. it is almost impossible to imagine that this creek served as the only source of drinking water and sanitation for tens of thousands of people.

    more
  • Andersonville National Cemetary

    Started as a burial site for the dead from Andersonville Prison. There are over 12,000 Civil War burials here. Lined in trenches, shoulder to shoulder, they are the greatest monument to those who went before and have followed them since. Andersonville was the most notorious civil war prison, where 1 in 3 (29%) of the inmates died. Because of the...

    more
  • National Prisoner of War Museum

    In 1970 legislation identified Andersonville as the site "to interpret the role of prisoners-of-war camps in history" and "to commemorate the sacrifice of Americans who lost their lives in such camps." The museum opened in 1998 and is dedicated to the American men and women who have suffered as POWs.Over half of the exhibits are about the prisoners...

    more
  • Camp Sumter (Civil War Prison)

    Camp Sumter, better known as Andersonville (named for the town a mile away), was the largest Confederate prison. Here, Federal soldiers were herded into a compound meant for a third the number already there. The water source was a stream through the middle of the stockade. Drinking and cooking water was to be taken from where the stream entered the...

    more
  • drummer boy museum

    the drummer boy civil war museum is located in the center of the village of andersonville. the museum has an interesting collection of civil war relics. for the $5 admission charge it is worth while to stop in and take a look.

    more
  • Recreated Fort

    Originally, the plan was to house 6000 prisoners here. There ended up being a total of over 45,000 imprisoned here. This part of the fort shows the haste with which the prison was expanded. Supplies were scarce and money very limited so they used local timber and expanded the fort as quickly as possible. Rations here were in very short supply; but...

    more
  • Camp Sumter

    The camp was actually named Camp Sumter; but almost everyone knows it by the more common name of Andersonville. Today the site honors the sacrifice of Prisoners of War from the Revolutionary War to the present day. Your first stop should be the visitors center where you can get informational brochures and other information to help you plan your...

    more
  • POW Museum

    The POW Museum at Andersonville NHS is worth a visit on its own. The museum commemorates the conditions under which US military members have been held prisoner from the Revolutionary War to the present.

    more
  • POW Monument

    This is a monument to all POWs from all wars. It is located just outside the Visitors Center/POW Museum.

    more
  • Andersonville National Cemetery

    The Andersonville cemetery started as a place to bury the dead from the prison; but as an active national cemetery all veterans are eligible to be buried here. There are about 19,000 graves here. Like the prison site, there are monuments here to the war dead. You may also see 6 graves set apart from the rest. These are the graves of the “raiders” a...

    more
  • Statues and Monuments

    There are a number of statues and monuments at the prison site and in the cemetery. Photo 1 is the New York Monument that was erected here in 1911 honoring those who died here from that state. The monument is large, as was the fashion of the day, to commemorate the great sacrifices made by the soldiers.

    more
  • Star Fort

    In addition to the earthworks they built what was called the Star Fort, a fortification housing the headquarters and the commandant’s quarters. Half the canons were placed facing out to repel an attack and the other half faced the prison grounds.

    more
  • The Hospital

    This is where the post hospital was located. The Confederate Army did not have adequate medical supplies for their own soldiers, so prisoners who came here rarely survived. Most refused to go to the hospital preferring to die amongst their friends and comrades.

    more
  • Water Supply

    The only source of water for the entire camp was a small branch of the inappropriately named Sweetwater Creek. This was the prisoners drinking water and the water for bathing and the latrine. The water slowly trickled by the guards camp and the bakerhouse fouling the water before it even entered the camp. The camp walls slowed the movement of the...

    more
  • Shebangs

    The prisoners were required to make there own shelters. They did so by using sticks and scraps of cloth, old uniforms or whatever they could scrounge up. These makeshift shelters were called “shebangs” and provided little actual shelter from the elements. This contributed to the prevalence of disease and death at the site.

    more
  • North Gate

    The prisoners' initial entry point to the prison was through the north gate. This area was built first and was better constructed than the expansion from the last tip. Prisoners would enter the outer gate into a small holding area, then the outer gate was closed and locked behind them. They would then enter the prison through the inner gate. Upon...

    more
  • Drummer Boy Museum

    The main reason you may want to stop in the town, rather than going directly to the Andersonville National Historic Site, though is the Drummer Boy Museum. It houses an interesting, and surprisingly extensive, collection of civil war memorabilia and specific items to the history of the prison. Admission is $5. Hours are 11 AM to 5 PM daily.

    more
  • Veterans Memorial

    There is a veterans memorial dedicated to those who died during the civil war in the middle of the main intersection in town.

    more
  • Andersonville Depot/Visitors Center

    This is the train depot where the union prisoners of war and all supplies arrived for Andersonville Prison. The depot was only about 1/4 mile from the prison but no doubt the prisoners were in bad shape, low spirits and hungry so it must have seemed much further. Today this building serves as the Visitors Center. The people here were very friendly...

    more
  • Andersonville, the Town

    The town of Andersonville existed as a supply stop for the trains bringing supplies to the notorious Andersonville Prison during the Civil War. Today, the town exists because of the Andersonville National Historic Site. There is not much else here. See the Veterans Monument and visit the museum.

    more
  • graves of the raiders

    an interesting and tragic story at camp sumter was the trial and execution of the raiders. the raiders were a group of union prisoners that preyed on their fellow prisoners. when new inmates entered the prison the raiders would rob these "fresh fish" of their money and belongings. the raiders actions enraged the whole camp and the inmates asked...

    more
  • andersonville national cemetery

    pictured is a section of 18,000 graves in andersonville national cemetery. during camp sumters operation during the civil war almost 13,000 prisoners were interned here. the prisoner deaths averaged about 100 per day due to disease and malnutrition. a distrubing but historically significant place to visit.

    more

Instant Answers: Andersonville

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

86 travelers online now

Comments

 
Explore Deeper into Andersonville
captain wirz's office
Things to Do
Andersonville Travel Guide
Map of Andersonville

View all Andersonville hotels