Augusta Things to Do

  • Lovely any time of day - beautiful for weddings.
    Lovely any time of day - beautiful for...
    by 807Wheaton
  • Marker for Grave of William Few
    Marker for Grave of William Few
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  • Ever beautiful grounds of St. Paul's Church
    Ever beautiful grounds of St. Paul's...
    by 807Wheaton

Most Recent Things to Do in Augusta

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    Augusta' s Imperial Theater

    by 807Wheaton Written Sep 7, 2005

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    The Imperial Theater - downtown Augusta, Georgia

    The Imperial Theater is one of those grand old movie theaters that closed for a period of time when the downtown left for the Malls.
    However, thankfully there are individuals that have a real desire to see downtown revitalized and one of the projects was the restoration and preservation of the Imperial Theater. The inside has been restored to its original beauty and now provides innovative performing arts venue.

    Related to:
    • Theater Travel
    • Architecture

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    The Augusta National

    by 807Wheaton Updated Aug 27, 2005

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    The Augusta National is on Washington Road. It's very low-key entrance is easy to miss if you don't know what you're looking for. If you turn in at this sign there is a big metal gate: Members Only!

    If you come during the week of The Masters the gate is open to visitors with a Ticket!
    Sorry this under "to do" because it's really something "you can't do". Just wanted to be inclusive.

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    George Washington Slept Here

    by 807Wheaton Written Aug 23, 2005

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    Marker about Washington's Southern Tour

    George Washington came to Augusta in 1791. There are several monuments that recognize this visit. This monument is behind St. Paul's Episcopal Church on Reynolds Street. Behind the monument you can see the cemetery that was used in Colonial day. There are many notable Georgians buried here. Some of the stones are broken and laying down on the grave.
    Some of the grave has stone covering over the entire grave. These seem to be in better condition.

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    Church of the Most Holy Trinity, Augusta, GA

    by 807Wheaton Updated Aug 23, 2005

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    Church of the Most Holy Trinity, Augusta, GA

    I have only been in this church once and that was during a Sunday morning mass. I housed an exchange student from Poland for a period of time and we went to mass at Church of the Most Holy Trinity.
    This church was built in the Romanesque Style during the time of the Civil War. It took quite a while for it to be completed due to the Union blockades at Southern Ports. The cornerstone was laid July 19, 1857 and was consecrated April 12, 1863.
    Smith and Crane Carvers served as the contractors for the church.The DeLaigle family and the Phinizy family of Augusta provided the bricks.

    This is a very pleasant church to view from the outside. It is surrounded by nice gardens. The inside has also been well cared for.

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    Visit the Joseph Lamar House

    by 807Wheaton Updated Aug 23, 2005

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    Joseph Lamar, Justice of the Supreme Court

    The Joseph Lamar House is next door to the boyhood home of Woodrow Wilson. He was a Supreme Court Justice during the adminstration of Woodrow Wilson.
    Historic Augusta, Inc. now has their headquarters in this restored home.

    Joseph Lamar was born in Ruckersville, GA on October 14, 1857, but grew up in the house on Telfair when his father, James S. Lamar became the Pastor of First Christian Church. Joseph Lamar studied law at Washington and Lee and clerked for an Augusta lawyer. He practiced law in Augusta until 1903. He was appointed Supreme Court Justice by President Howard Taft December 12, 1910. He served on the Supreme Court for five years and died January 2, 1916. He is buried in Summerville Cemetery in Augusta, GA.

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    Entrance to Sacred Heart Cultural Center

    by 807Wheaton Updated Aug 23, 2005

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    Entrance to Sacred Heart Cultural Center

    It was difficult to take pictures of the exterior of this place because of its size and the abundance of trees surrounding it. Of course, that all adds to its charm.
    The window over the entrance shows the Last Supper.
    The front facade displays bold stonework which contrasts in color and texture with the rich complexity of the brickwork. There are fifteen different styles of brickwork displayed.

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    I. M. Pei Building

    by 807Wheaton Written Aug 23, 2005

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    Building designed by I.M. Pei

    This is one of several buildings that architect I.M. Pei designed for downtown Augusta.
    He also designed the Augusta Metro Chamber of Commerce building.

    Do you think it resembles the Louvre?
    I have never been in this particular building so I can't really tell you anything about it.
    I plan a few more trips downtown with my digitial camera, so perhaps that would be a good place to make the next stop.

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    Step inside St. Paul's

    by 807Wheaton Written Aug 23, 2005

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    Inside St. Paul's Episcopal Church
    1 more image

    St. Paul's is open every week day to the public. It's a beautiful place to come for some quiet time and reflect on the history of Augusta.
    During the fall and winter there are special muscial programs at lunch time for a small fee, which includes a box lunch and some wonderful classic music.

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    Original site of Fort Augusta

    by 807Wheaton Written Aug 23, 2005

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    Site of Fort Augusta, 1739

    Behind St. Paul's Episcopal Church is the Celtic Cross that marks the site of the original Fort Augusta.
    This is a lovely area and the steps lead up to the Riverwalk on the Savannah River.
    The day I was there it was a hot August day but this area was cool and inviting.

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    St. Paul's Episcopal Church

    by 807Wheaton Written Aug 23, 2005

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    St. Paul's Episcopal Church

    Located at 605 Reynolds Street this is the 4th building on this site which was originally the Ft. Augusta complex. The fire of 1916 which swept through much of downtown Augusta was the demise of the third structure.
    Ft. Augusta was constructed by the British in 1739, followed by the first St. Paul's.
    The cemetery around the church was used by the colonials through 1816. This is the resting place of many notable Georgians.
    The church is open Monday through Friday 9:00 to 5:00, Saturday 10:00 to 12:00.

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    The Old Government House

    by 807Wheaton Updated Aug 23, 2005

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    The Old Government Building

    This wonderful building was designed in 1801 to serve as the center of Government for the city of Augusta. It has also been the home of a number of esteemed families in Augusta.
    Restored by the city of Augusta the building now serves as a reception hall and also features changing art exhibits.

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    2nd largest Ginko Tree in the U.S.

    by 807Wheaton Written Aug 23, 2005

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    Trees around the Old Government House

    Another shot of the Old Government Building. It's a little difficult to see in this picture, the tree to the top right corner is recognized as the 2nd largest Ginko Tree in the U.S. Supposedly it was planted in 1791 to commemorate George Washington's visit to Augusta, Ga.
    There is also the biggest Magnolia Tree I've ever seen just to the right of the Ginko.
    Telfair Street must have been really grand back in its day. However, the homes and buildings did not have the blessing of the large trees that grace the grounds we see and visit today.

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    Step inside Ware's Folly

    by 807Wheaton Written Aug 23, 2005

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    Ware's Folly Dramatic Entrance

    Tours are given at this magnificent house.
    It is open Tuesday through Friday 10:00 to 5:00 and Saturday 10:00 to 2:00.
    Admission is charged.
    When on the tour and looking at the wonderful architecture, take a good look in the original window glass upstairs. One of the windows has etching of initials from a child of one of the early, if not the original owner.

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    Gertrude Herbert Institute of Art -"Ware's Folly"

    by 807Wheaton Updated Aug 23, 2005

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    Gertrude Herbert Institute of Art

    This Federal Style House now houses the Gertrude Herbert Institute of Art. Built in 1818 for Nicholas Ware the mayor of Augusta it was dubbed "Ware's Folly". It cost $40,000 to build this uniquely designed house. Now it is a center for art classes and changing art shows.

    Still containing original glass windows one of the windows has an etching on it with the initials of previous owners from the 1880's.

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    Bell Auditorium

    by 807Wheaton Updated Aug 23, 2005

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    Bell Auditorium, Augusta, GA

    Brenda Lee got her start here at the Bell Auditorium in Augusta, Ga in 1956. She was discovered by Red Foley. Brenda Mae Tarpley lived in a small house off Gordon Highway. She is known for hits: "I'm Sorry" and "All Alone am I" and numerous others.

    The website shown below gives information about numerous celebs and influential personalities born in or very near Augusta.
    Not all performed at The Bell. Some performed in the U.S. Senate and other honorary places in the world.

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Augusta Things to Do

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