Chatsworth Things to Do

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    by butterflykizzez04
  • Things to Do
    by butterflykizzez04
  • Things to Do
    by butterflykizzez04

Most Recent Things to Do in Chatsworth

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    Cohutta Overlook

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Apr 28, 2014
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    April 4, 2014, Tony and I was driving the back roads of Georgia on our way to Helen, GA to visit the Bavarian Village. We passed Fort Mountain State Park, which we love by the way. We visited there a few weeks back, but this time ON TO HELEN....on down the road towards Elijay, Ga I noticed a sign "COHUTTA OVERLOOK"...I said...BRAKE..side trip..

    My husband is used to this..that is why I travel the back roads so I can find interesting sites, old homes and buildings and overlooks...I do this quite regularly...Glad I am the driver. I also Brake for Yard Sales...lol

    I drove out the side road and parked along the narrow ONE WAY road..and we started to climb up the side of the small mountain via a trail and some stairs...its a nice little HEART POUNDING hike..but once you are at the top...oh WOW !!! the View is AWESOME...STUNNING..the adjectives keep going on, on and on...You have to take the 10-15 minutes out of your schedule to check out this great vista.

    I loved it.
    I took several photos ( of course )
    And AGAIN..I can't say it enough....FREE FREE FREE !!!!

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    Murray County Courthouse

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 26, 2014
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    The Doric-styled courthouse was erected in 1916 and is one of only three domed courthouses in the State of Georgia. The Courthouse has been home for various county officials and still maintains offices in the building. In a controversy during the planning, Murray County Commissioners went to jail for contempt rather than see any interruptions of their plans. The first court session was held in February 1917

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    Spring Place Mission

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 26, 2014
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    Saturday Feb 22nd, Tony and I drove down to Dalton and Chatsworth GA to go hiking and we came across this old Indian Cemetery located a few miles from Chief Vann House..it was very interesting to visit and read the signs about the settlement.

    The sign there gives a lot of background information:
    SPRINGPLACE MISSION

    "Southward from this spot stood the famous mission founded in 1801 by Moravian Brethren from Salem, NC
    The first school among the Cherokees, this mission continued until 1833 and added much to their remarkable advancement. Here were taught many leaders of the Cherokee Nation. One was Elias Boudinot, later editor of the "The Cherokee Phoenix"
    The work begun here was not abandoned with the forced removal of the Cherokee but was transferred to New Springplace in Oklahoma"

    The location has several graves surrounded by a wooden fence called "God's Acre" which is the Springplace Mission Cemetery from 1812 to 1834 and Principal Chief Charles Renatus Hicks 1767-1834.
    Several of Chief Vann's family members are buried here and this park is located only about a mile from the Chief Vann House Historic Park.

    This is a free location. If in the area, you should stop and check it out.

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    Chief Vann House Historic Park

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 25, 2014
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    Saturday, Feb 22nd, Tony and I went to Georgia to do a little hiking at Fort Mountain State Historic Park...and we passed this Historic Site on Rt 52 between Chatsworth and Dalton..so we stopped.
    It is a beautiful park and we had gorgeous 65 degree sunny weather to enjoy the park.

    We stopped at the park and went in. During the 1790s, James Vann became a Cherokee Indian leader and wealthy businessman. He established the largest and most prosperous plantation in the Cherokee Nation, covering 1,000 acres of what is now Murray County.. In 1804 he completed construction of a beautiful 2 1/2-story brick home that was the most elegant in the Cherokee Nation. After Vann was murdered in 1809, his son Joseph inherited the mansion and plantation. Joseph was also a Cherokee leader and became even more wealthy than his father.
    When In the 1830s almost the entire Cherokee Nation was forced west by state and federal troops on the infamous Trail of Tears. The Vann family lost their elegant home, rebuilding in the Cherokee Territory of Oklahoma. Today the Vann House survives as Georgia's best-preserved historic Cherokee Indian home. A guided tour allows visitors to see the house which features beautiful hand carvings, a remarkable "floating" staircase, a 12-foot mantle and fine antiques

    It cost only $6 per adult to tour the site including the museum inside the Visitors center and the outer buildings around the plantation home.

    At the park visitors center there are some restrooms and picnic tables for your use. NO grills and there is a small gift shop.

    Hours: Thursday-Saturday / 9AM-5PM
    Last tour begins 45 minutes before closing (gates locked).
    Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year's Day.
    GeorgiaStateParks.org/Ch…

    FACILITIES:
    * 109 Acres
    * Guided House Tour
    * Visitor Center (film, exhibits and artifacts)
    * Gift Shop
    * 1/2-Mile Nature Trail
    * 6 Picnic Tables
    * Bus Parking

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    The Chattahoochee - Oconee National Forest

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 25, 2014
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    The Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest in northern Georgia comprises two United States National Forests, the Oconee National Forest and Chattahoochee National Forest. The combined total area of the Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest is 866,468 acres (3,506 km2), of which the Chattahoochee National Forest comprises 750,145 acres (3,036 km2) and the Oconee National Forest comprises 116,232 acres (470 km2).[1] The county with the largest portion of the forest is Rabun County, Georgia, which has 148,684 acres (601.7 km2) within its boundaries.

    he Chattahoochee National Forest takes its name from the Chattahoochee River whose headwaters begin in the North Georgia mountains. The River and the area were given the name by the English settlers who took the name from the Indians living here. The Cherokee and Creek Indians inhabited North Georgia. In one dialect of the Muskogean languages, Chatta means stone; ho chee, marked or flowered. These marked or flowered stones were in the Chattahoochee River at a settlement near Columbus, Georgia
    The Chattahoochee National Forest today covers 18 north Georgia counties. The Chattahoochee currently has three ranger districts:
    Blue Ridge Ranger District, Office in Blairsville, GA
    Chattooga River Ranger District, Office in Tallulah Falls, GA
    Conasauga Ranger District, Office in Chattsworth, GA
    It includes over 2,200 miles (3,500 km) of rivers and streams (including about 1,367 miles (2,200 km) of trout streams). There are over 450 miles (720 km) of hiking and other recreation trails, and 1,600 miles (2,600 km) of "roads." In addition to the Chattooga River and the headwaters of the Chattahoochee River, natural attractions within it boundaries include the beginning of the 2,174-mile (3,499 km) Appalachian Trail, Georgia's highpoint, Brasstown Bald and Anna Ruby Falls.
    The Chattahoochee also includes ten wildernesses that are part of the National Wilderness Preservation System, all of which are managed by the United States Forest Service. Parts of these wilderness extend outside Chattahoochee National Forest, as indicated. The wildernesses are:
    Big Frog Wilderness (Cherokee NF in Tennessee and Chattahoochee NF in Georgia)
    Blood Mountain Wilderness
    Brasstown Wilderness
    Cohutta Wilderness (Chattahoochee NF in Georgia and Cherokee NF in Tennessee)
    Ellicott Rock Wilderness (Nantahala NF in North Carolina; Sumter NF in South Carolina; and Chattahoochee NF in Georgia)
    Mark Trail Wilderness
    Raven Cliffs Wilderness
    Rich Mountain Wilderness
    Southern Nantahala Wilderness (Chattahoochee NF in Georgia and Nantahala NF in North Carolina)
    Tray Mountain Wilderness
    The Oconee National Forest today is spread over eight Georgia counties and is organized into one ranger district. The Oconee Ranger District maintains several hiking and other recreational trails in the forest. Forest headquarters are located in Gainesville, Georgia.

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    Fort Mountain State Historic Park

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 25, 2014
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    Tony and I went hiking here on Saturday Feb 22nd. It was very easy to find. We took I-24 to Dalton exit 333 and then went 52 East to Chatsworth Ga. In Chatsworth you cross the railroad tracks and start up the mountain for 8 miles to the park entrance. There are several areas to pull over for some spectacular views of the mountains and overlooks are wide.

    We entered the park. There is $5 fee when its open, but today when we went it was FREE..We stopped at the visitors center to get a map and I purchased a post card for my parents and a sticker for my dad's collection.
    We drove out the park to the dead end loop for parking and hiking to the ancient wall and tower overlook. Well marked color code paths..We followed the red and yellow trails.
    Loved the park. A lot of steps so it was a little exerting but we made it.
    Some history on the park from their website:

    A scenic drive on Hwy. 52 near the Cohutta Wilderness leads visitors to this mountain getaway. Hikers, mountain bikers and horseback riders will find some of the most beautiful trails in Georgia, winding through hardwood forest and blueberry thickets, crossing streams and circling a pretty lake. Hikers can also explore a stone fire tower built by the Civilian Conservation Corps and an ancient rock wall which stand on the highest point of the mountain. The mysterious 855-foot-long wall is thought to have been built by early Indians as fortification against more hostile Indians or for ancient ceremonies.

    During summer, visitors can cool off on a lakeside beach, while stables offer guided horseback rides and stall rental throughout the year. Park guests may stay overnight in fully equipped cottages, a campground or backpacking campsites

    Park Hours: 7AM-10PM
    Notice: Gates lock at 10PM. No late access.
    Office Hours: 8AM-5PM
    $5 parking. Annual passes available.

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    Log Cabin on Chief Vann's Springplace Plantation

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Mar 9, 2005

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    Log Cabin beside the Chief Vann House

    This reconstruction depicts one of the log cabins as it would have appeared on the Chief Joseph Vann's Springplace Plantation. A plantation was more like a small town than just a single house. in all there were 96 structures on the Vann estate. In addition to his fine home there were many cabins, some to house his 110 African slaves and others for hired help. There were also barns, smokehouses, corn cribs, a grist mill, a sawmill, blacksmith shops, taverns, a peach kiln, and whiskey stills. There were also 1,133 peach and 147 apple trees and about 800 acres of cultivated land. All in all, Joseph Vann's business and farms were estimated to cover more than 4,000 acres in the Cherokee Nation.

    Forced from their home on a cold March day, just because they were Cherokee, Joseph Vann and his family fled north to a farm he owned in Tennessee. In 1836 the Vanns made their way to Webber's Falls, Oklahoma at the southern end of the new Cherokee Nation. In the 1940s the federal government made restitution totaling nearly $20,000 to Joseph Vann for his Georgia holdings.

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    Visitor Center: Chief Vann House St. Historic Site

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Mar 9, 2005

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    Exhibit in the Vann House Museum

    This exhibit in the Chief Vann House Visitor Center Museum looks more like a chapter out of Gone with the Wind than Dances with Wolves. Studying the Cherokee can dispel many stereotypes of Native Americans. The Cherokee's first known encounter with Europeans was Hernando DeSoto's expedition in 1540. Within the next three centuries Europeans came to the eastern United States in ever increasing numbers and native culture began to give way to a more European lifestyle.

    Around the time of the American revolution, bows and arrows were replaced with rifles, and mud homes (called wattle and daub) were replaced with log cabins. The more advanced Cherokees lived lifestyles far more sophisticated than many Whites, and the more well-to-do among them built vast plantations which were worked with slave labor.

    In 1832, Georgia instituted a system of land grants, enabling white citizens to purchase lottery tickets for the chance to win 160 acres of Indian land. During this time Georgia passed several laws specific to the wealthier Cherokee. A Cherokee could not testify against a White in court, nor could a Cherokee employ Whites. Joseph Vann unknowingly violated these new laws when he sought to hire a White overseer for his Springplace plantaion. Because of this infraction, Col. William Bishop, the head of the Georgia Guard, sought to claim Joseph's house for himself in March of 1935.

    Spencer Riley, a White boarder who was renting from Joseph, claimed that he had won the house in the 1832 Georgia land lottery. A gun battle erupted in the house between the claimants. On orders from Bishop, militiamen wounded Riley and placed a smoldering log on the stairway to smoke everyone out. The charred flooring is still visible on the landing of the house.

    In addition to the museum, the Visitor Center has a gift and book shop, restrooms, and an outstanding video which tells some of the Vann House story.

    Hours:
    Tuesday - Saturday: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
    Sunday: 2 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

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    Chief Vann House State Historic Site

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Mar 9, 2005

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    Chief Vann House

    When I first saw this classic mansion it was a huge disappointment to me. That's because I was about 8 years old, and I was told we were going to see the home of an Indian Chief. I expected a teepee - not a two-story brick house.

    I was at the Vann House most recently on the first week-end in March, and now at age 60, I find the place utterly fascinating. It shatters the stereotypical image of American Indian life, and to visit it is both an eye opening and a moving experience.

    Called the "Showplace of the Cherokee Nation," the Vann House is perhaps the best-preserved Cherokee plantation home. It was built by James Vann, the son of a Scottish trader and a Cherokee woman. Vann became an influential Cherokee and gained great wealth by placing various businesses along the Federal Road which forked through the Cherokee Nation in the early 1800s. Brick for the house was made of clay found on Vann's plantaion; lumber was cut from his own forest and sawed at his mills; nails were hand made from his blacksmith shops. The labor was provided by his more than 100 black slaves. At the time Vann moved into the mansion with his 2 wives and 9 children, March 24, 1805, he was one of the wealthiest men in America.

    James Vann, who lived a rather violent life, was murdered in 1809, and his son, Joseph inherited the house. Joseph, called "Rich Joe," proved to be an even better businessman than his father. He became a leading and respected voice in the Cherokee Legislature.

    Despite his wealth and influence, Vann was forced to leave his home and move to "Indian Territory" in present-day Oklahoma in 1832, during the inmamous "Trail of Tears," one of the darkest hours in American history. More of that in the next tip.

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    The Spring at Springplace Plantation

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Mar 8, 2005

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    The Spring at Springplace Plantation

    In the early 1800s the site of a home, whether a humble farmstead or a large plantation, was chosen in part because of its accessability to a good water source. A short walk downhill from the Vann House you will find this spring where the water runs cool and clear at a year-round temperature of about 58F. The stone spring house would have served as a refrigerator for keeping milk, butter and other items cool during the hot summers.

    Vann's plantation was named Springplace, perhaps after this spring. Highway 255, which goes in front of the Vann House, leads 30 miles north to my hometown of Cleveland, Tennessee, where the highway is called Springplace Road.

    In addition to a fresh supply of water, a spring was also a mystical place to the Cherokee. According to Indian lore, beneath our world on top of the earth there is another world below. It is just like our own world, with trees, animals, etc., except that in the underworld the seasons are reversed. The rivers and streams are the highways to this underground world, and the springs are the doorway. The only way one can visit the world below is to fast, go to the waters, and be led by a guide from the undeworld.

    See my Cleveland, Tennessee, pages (off-the-beaten-path) for more on the Cherokee removal and the Trail of Tears.

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Chatsworth Things to Do

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