Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park Favorites

  • Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park
    Chickamauga and Chattanooga National...
    by goingsolo
  • Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park
    Chickamauga and Chattanooga National...
    by goingsolo
  • Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park
    Chickamauga and Chattanooga National...
    by goingsolo

Most Recent Favorites in Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park

  • paulscuba's Profile Photo

    Did you know?

    by paulscuba Written Jun 17, 2007

    Favorite thing: This battlefield is extremely wooded and was not the preferred location for either side. The union army was searching for Confederate Army after it had withdrawn earlier in the year. The Confederate general baited a trap and rejoined his army near Chickamauga. His main army and a portion of the Union army accidentally met at this location and the battle was joined. General Bragg who was apparently not the best tactical mind did have two divisions of under Longstreet, sent by railroad from the Army of N. Virginia in an attempt to defeat the Union Army on a large scale.

    The reason why the generals did not want to meet here is... Before there was radio all communication of battlefield status was done visually. The trees interfered with this so the local commanders became more important in setting strategy and troop movements. Back at this time without better info, commanders usually just headed towards the gunfire.

    Result of the battle was a Confederate victory. THe Union did have an opportunity to retreat to Chattanooga and was put under seige there. The seige of Chattanooga was broken two months later during the Battle of Lookout Mountain(There is a military Park at that location). Poor troop placement and decisions allowed for a Union Victory at Chattanooga. At this point Bragg was replaced by Johnston as the commander of the Army of Tennessee. It was Johnston who fought Sherman during the Atlanta Campaign.

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    Dogs are Allowed

    by paulscuba Written Jun 17, 2007

    Favorite thing: Outside of the entering the visitor center. Dogs are allowed on all the trails and roads. Be a good dog owner and carry a plastic bag for dog duty and do as we did and keep the pup from marking the monuments. The website says nothing on this subject so whenever going verify this with the Park if you plan to take your pup.

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  • goingsolo's Profile Photo

    Heavy artillery

    by goingsolo Updated Nov 2, 2005

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    Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park

    Favorite thing: At the visitor center entrance and at various points along the auto tour, you'll find the canons. These long range weapons (for the 19th century anyway) can fire at targets nearly 5 miles away, destroying scores of advancing soldiers. The developement of these weapons and their use during the civil war resulted in a change of tactics from the conventional straight march forward into the face of the enemy. Sadly, it took all the casualties of this war to change the way of thinking. Its hard to imagine men lined up in formation, standing shoulder to shoulder with their fellow statesmen marching forward only to be mowed down in large numbers by the single blast of a canon. As you look out at the wide exposed battlefield where bales of hay stand to honor those that fell, its beyond comprehension to imagine marching in formation, straight forward while your brothers lie in wait in the thickets prepared to blast you away.

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    The Fallen

    by goingsolo Updated Aug 22, 2005

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    Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park

    Favorite thing: There are different markers scattered throughout the battlefields to honor those who fell here. The pyramids represent commanders and generals who died during the battle and are placed as close as possible to the spot where it happened, relying on the memories of the veterans who fought in the wars.

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    Brotherton cabin

    by goingsolo Updated Aug 22, 2005

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    Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park

    Favorite thing: The Brotherton cabin was the sight of a Confederate thrashing of Union forces during the battle of Chickamauga. The cabin was owned by Tom Brotherton, a confederate officer. Because Brotherton knew the area well, General Longstreet amassed his army in the woods and prepared an attack on the cabin, as Union General Rosencranz had set up his headquarters nearby. The Confederate army broke the Union line forced the army's retreat.

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    Hiking trails

    by goingsolo Updated Aug 22, 2005

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    Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park

    Favorite thing: There are miles of hiking trails that lead into the dense woods surrounding the battlefields. Like the fields, the trails are marked by monuments and signs which tell the story of the battles that happened here.

    The hiking trails give a more realistic experience than traveling on the main road alongside the open fields. Most of the fighting occured in thick forests like the ones the lie beyond the grass and tall monuments. Visibility was severely limited and the armies could not form battle lines.

    Much like Gettysburg, neither side chose this battlefield but both were drawn into it. Also similar to Gettysburg was the fact that both sides knew that control of this territory was critical and would have a substantial impact on the outcome of the war. The prevailing army would establish control over the city of Chattanooga. For the South, losing this battle meant that railway lines would be cut off, preventing the Confederates from receiving much needed supplies and leading to inevitable starvation and surrender. It also meant a further invasion of the towns and homes of many southern people, a cause for which the south was prepared to fight to the death. For the north, controlling Chattanooga brought the Union one step closer to winning this war and ending succession. With so much at stake, fighting was fierce, even where the enemy could barely be seen.

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  • goingsolo's Profile Photo

    Battle of Chattanooga

    by goingsolo Updated Aug 16, 2005

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    Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park

    Favorite thing: Nearly a month after their defeat at Chickamauga, the Union brought in reinforcements who opened a supply line to the beseiged Union troops. In November, a three day battle ensued in which the Union took Missionary Ridge and, quite dramatically, Lookout Mountain, driving the Confederates out of Tennessee. Several months later, General Sherman and his army left Chattanooga and began the March to the Sea which resulted in the seige of Atlanta and, eventually, the end of the war.

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  • goingsolo's Profile Photo

    Battle of Chickamauga

    by goingsolo Updated Aug 16, 2005

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    Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park

    Favorite thing: The battle of Chickamauga was a Confederate victory, albeit a temporary one. Knowing the importance of protecting the city of Chattanooga and the railway line. General Braxton Bragg's regiment of 43,000 Confederates combined with an additional 22,000 men from Tennessee, Virginia and Mississippi, spread out on the bank of Chickamauga Creek. Here they encountered Rosencranz army of equal number. Fierce fighting on September 19 forced the Union army to retreat, but only partially. The next day, General Longstreet's Confederate forces took advantage of a gap in Rosencrantz line and destroyed nearly half his army. Although Union forces held their ground for nearly a day despite staggering losses, they eventually retreated into Chattanooga. With the Confederates holding Lookout Mountain and the Chattanooga Valley, allowing them to fire on any Union troops attempting to interfere with rail lines, the Union's mission was thwarted.

    But that is only part one of the battle.

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  • goingsolo's Profile Photo

    Monuments

    by goingsolo Updated Aug 15, 2005

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    Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park

    Favorite thing: Chicakmauga and Chattanooga was the first of four national military parks created to preserve and remember. In the late 1800s, civil war veterans walked through the area iudentifying the areas of key battle sites. Today, hundreds of monuments can be found along battlefield sites and through the wooded areas surrounding them. Each state, each regiment within a particular state and each commander is memorialized with plaques, statues and words.

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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Memorials as Art

    by mrclay2000 Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Kentucky Monument

    Favorite thing: Many of the monuments are more than a simple column etched with the names of the home state and the regiments serving. Some are more elaborate and should be considered for their detail as well as their meaning.

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    The Union Remembers Its Own

    by mrclay2000 Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Wisconsin Monument

    Favorite thing: Most of the monuments and markers in the park commemorate Union regiments that served from as far away as Wisconsin. The Civil War was so broad and so divisive that the muster lists on these rolls of honor bring the size of this overwhelming conflict down to an individual human level.

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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Have some fun with your keepsakes

    by mrclay2000 Written Feb 25, 2003

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    more Confederate monuments

    Favorite thing: While at Kennesaw Mountain, I was informed that the south never spent terribly much on monuments to their dead on modern Civil War battlefields. Chickamauga seems to be the one exception to this basic rule.

    On this field the monuments are generally elegant or noble sculptures representing regiments who fought here.

    The worst part about the park is the huge assortment of shiny silver markers that look like tilted table-tops. The stacks of cannonballs throughout the park represent the position of commanding headquarters. In the summer the heat, humidity and bugs can be a problem.

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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    The Importance of History to the Modern U.S.

    by mrclay2000 Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Confederate monument on the field

    Favorite thing: While at Kennesaw Mountain, I was informed that the south never spent terribly much on monuments to their dead on modern Civil War battlefields. Chickamauga seems to be the one exception to this basic rule.

    On this field the monuments are generally elegant or noble sculptures representing regiments who fought here.

    The worst part about the park is the huge assortment of shiny silver markers that look like tilted table-tops. The stacks of cannonballs throughout the park represent the position of commanding headquarters. In the summer the heat, humidity and bugs can be a problem.

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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Guns Line the Way

    by mrclay2000 Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Illinois marker and field guns

    Favorite thing: As in many Civil War parks, cannon line several fields. You are free to traipse out into the grass (watch for rattlesnakes) and touch and explore and play act as you wish.

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