Dalton Travel Guide

  • Dalton
    by butterflykizzez04
  • Dalton
    by butterflykizzez04
  • Dalton
    by butterflykizzez04

Dalton Things to Do

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    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 26, 2014

    Joseph Eggleston Johnston (February 3, 1807 – March 21, 1891) was a career U.S. Army officer, serving with distinction in the Mexican-American War and Seminole Wars, and was also one of the most senior general officers in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. He was unrelated to Albert Sidney Johnston, another high-ranking Confederate general.
    Johnston was trained as a civil engineer at the U.S. Military Academy. He served in Florida, Texas, and Kansas, and fought with distinction in the Mexican-American War and by 1860 achieved the rank of brigadier general as Quartermaster General of the U.S. Army. When his native state of Virginia seceded from the Union, Johnston resigned his commission, the highest-ranking officer to join the Confederacy. To his dismay, however, he was appointed only the fourth ranking full general in the Confederate Army.
    Johnston's effectiveness in the Civil War was undercut by tensions with Confederate President Jefferson Davis, who often criticized him for a lack of aggressiveness, and victory eluded him in most campaigns he personally commanded. However, he was the senior Confederate commander at the First Battle of Bull Run in 1861, and his recognition of the important necessary actions, and prompt application of leadership in that victory is usually credited to his subordinate, P. G. T. Beauregard. He defended the Confederate capital of Richmond, Virginia, during the 1862 Peninsula Campaign, withdrawing under the pressure of a superior force under Union Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan. In his only offensive action during the campaign, he suffered a severe wound at the Battle of Seven Pines, after which he was replaced in command by his classmate at West Point, Robert E. Lee. In 1863, in command of the Department of the West, he was criticized for his actions and failures in the Vicksburg Campaign. In 1864, he fought against Union Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman in the Atlanta Campaign, but was relieved of command after withdrawing from northwest Georgia to the outskirts of the city. In the final days of the war, he was returned to command of the small remaining forces in the Carolinas Campaign and surrendered his armies to Sherman on April 26, 1865. Two of his major opponents, Grant and Sherman, made comments highly respectful of his actions in the war, and they became close friends with Johnston in subsequent years.
    After the war Johnston was an executive in the railroad and insurance businesses. He served a term in Congress and was commissioner of railroads under Grover Cleveland. He died of pneumonia after serving in inclement weather as a pallbearer at the funeral of his former adversary, and later friend, William T. Sherman.

    Johnston statue in Dalton, Georgia, where he took Photo taken between 1861 and 1865 Joseph E. Johnston and Robert E. Lee in 1869-70 The Atlanta Campaign from Dalton to Kennesaw Mount
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    by doug48 Updated May 23, 2012

    the wink theater was built by j. c. wink in 1941. the wink theater served as a movie theater from 1941 to 2005. today it is home to a church. the wink theater is worth a look when in downtown for it's interesting architectural style. the wink theater is listed on the national register of historic places.

    wink theater
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    by doug48 Updated Oct 27, 2010

    the dalton city cemetery is the final resting place of 421 confederate and 4 union solders killed in action in the dalton area during the civil war. this beautiful cemetery has an excellent collection of funerary art.

    dalton cemetery
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Dalton Restaurants

  • by JefferyMelton Written Dec 30, 2011

    If you find yourself in Dalton, Georgia you must try this restaurant. A Nationally registered historic landmark The Dalton Depot is one of the few Victorian era train stations that survived Sherman's infamous "March to the Sea" during the civil war. The food is great along with friendly service. The best seafood I have found away from the coast and being from Tybee Island I know seafood. The Steaks were cooked to order and very flavorful. Anytime we are in Dalton this will be our stop for food. And if we are just going to be passing by we will time our trip so we will be going by Dalton at meal time.

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    by doug48 Updated Jul 11, 2009

    located on US 41 about two miles south of downtown is miller brothers rib shack. the local barbecue restaurant offers barbecue beef, pork, chicken, and ribs. the service was good and the barbecue excellent. for barbecue lovers miller's is worth a stop in the dalton area.

    miller brothers rib shack
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  • Dalton Hotels

    19 Hotels in Dalton

Dalton Off The Beaten Path

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    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 26, 2014

    Saturday, Feb 22nd, Tony and I went for a drive in Georgia and we came across this lovely old mill in Varnell, Georgia. The care taker was there and told us a little about the history of the mill.

    HISTORY OF THE MILL:
    Now listed on the National Register of Historic Places, Prater's Mill's heritage runs back to the days of the Cherokee Indians. Built by Benjamin Franklin Prater in 1855, the water powered mill was originally fitted with the latest in grain cleaning, grinding and sifting machinery, all powered by the Coahulla Creek.

    As the mill's popularity grew, Prater added a cotton gin, a saw mill, a wool carder (device that combs sheep wool), a syrup mill, a general store and blacksmiths shop. For almost a century, farmers lined up their mules and wagons before dawn, waiting for their turn with the millers.

    During the Civil War, the mill was used as a campsite by soldiers from both sides. While occupied by the Union army, the mill was considered a valuable resource for food and was not destroyed. The Prater family operated the Mill until the 1950's. A succession of millers ran it until the 1960's. In 1971, the all-volunteer Prater's Mill Foundation took over the Mill and began its extensive restoration and preservation efforts. Today, the mill is best known for the arts and crafts festivals held twice each year. Throughout the year, the grounds are a popular site for fishing, cookouts and family reunions.

    Touring:
    A living musem for all occasions. What do a historic working mill, the Civil War, Cherokee Indians and dazzling wildlife and plants have in common? You or your group can discover, explore and experience them all at Historic Praters Mill Heritage Park. Visitors will see a working 19th century grist mill, a cotton gin, general store, and soon to be added to the tour a train caboose and old barn. We promise to engage your imagination.

    Directions:
    Prater's Mill is located at 5845 Georgia Highway 2, Dalton, GA 30721 on GA Hwy. 2, 10 miles Northeast of Dalton and about 30 miles south of Chattanooga, TN. Exit I-75 at Hwy. 201 (Tunnel Hill - Varnell Exit-341). Travel North 4.5 miles to GA Hwy. 2, turn right on GA Hwy. 2 (right at the Dollar General) and continue 2.6 miles to Prater's Mill.

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