Dawsonville Travel Guide

  • Things to Do
    by butterflykizzez04
  • Things to Do
    by butterflykizzez04
  • Things to Do
    by butterflykizzez04

Dawsonville Things to Do

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Apr 28, 2014

    I have been here TWICE in the past 6 months and I have yet to see the FALLS..what's up with that?
    The first time we went, we saw some of the falls, made it about half way up the mountain before the rain started pouring down...so we turned around and ran for the VAN..it was pouring cats and dogs..the type of rain that you can't even see in front of you..were were DRENCHED...

    The second time was this past April 4, 2014...it was a very nice day but we were on our way to Helen, Ga and we had a long ways to still go. We stopped to use the restrooms only, so the guard didn't make us pay the $5 per car to enter.
    While Tony was using the facilities, I went into the Visitors Center...
    There was two ladies there showing live birds, hawks and owls and a man was displaying the snakes..UGH...I backed away from the snakes...but the Hawk and Owl I was drawn too. they were both so gorgeous..
    Noel my daughter would have loved this part of the trip.

    We were there about 25 minutes, due to the place being PACKED...so we got back on the road..but NEXT time Three times is the CHARM..I am going to see that waterfall and hike that hike...then I will update my review..

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    • Family Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

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  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 8, 2014

    Amicalola Falls State Park is an 829 acre (3.35 km²) Georgia state park located between Ellijay and Dahlonega in Dawsonville, Georgia. The park's name is derived from a Cherokee language word meaning "tumbling waters". The park is home to Amicalola Falls, a 729-foot (222 m) waterfall, making it the highest in Georgia.[1] It is considered to be one of the Seven Natural Wonders of Georgia. An eight-mile (13 km) trail that winds past Amicalola Falls and leads to Springer Mountain, famous for being the southern terminus of the Appalachian Trail, begins in the park. Amicalola Falls State Park also offers many hiking trails, a guest lodge, restaurant, cabins, a shelter for long distance Appalachian Trail hikers, a campground and access to the eco-friendly Len Foote Hike Inn

    Little is known about the falls before the 19th century. The Cherokee tribe controlled the area of the state park until 1832, when the Treaty of New Echota forced the Cherokee to leave and go further west into the Ozarks. This mass removal would later be known as the Trail of Tears. The first written account of the falls was penned by a local citizen by the name of William Williamson, who was exploring the area looking for land that he would take during the Sixth Georgia Land Lottery. Williamson wrote:
    “ In the course of my route in the Mountains I discovered a Water Fall perhaps the greatest in the World the most majestic Scene that I have ever witnessed or heard of the Creek passes over the mountain & the fall I think can't be less than Six hundred Yards. The Mountain is at least three fourths of a mile high. I made great exertions to get on the summit but the ascent was so great that I was completely exhausted by the time I reached half way. My position was such that I had a perfect view of the entire Fall The Steam is Called Um-ma-eolola from the Fall (Sliding Water) [2] ”
    After the lottery had taken place, an unknown settler was given the land, but chose not to live on it because the terrain proved to be too rugged. Nearby settlers knew a Cherokee woman who lived in the area until the 1850s, who refused to leave along with her tribe.[3]
    The state purchased the falls in 1911. Amicalola Falls State Park was not developed at all until the Georgia Appalachian Trail Club decided that the nearby Springer Mountain would be where they would move the southern terminus of the Appalachian Trail from Mount Oglethorpe in 1958. An 8.5-mile (13.7 km) long trail was blazed from the base of Amicalola Falls to the top of Springer Mountain so that Appalachian Trail hikers would be able to access the trail from a major highway.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing

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  • rexvaughan's Profile Photo

    by rexvaughan Updated Jun 18, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is a truly beautiful waterfall in a forested mountain park. The name purportedly derives from a Cherokee word meaning "tumbling waters." It fits as the falls tumble down a steep 729 foot drop. The trail to the bridge near the top is fairly steep and ends with a series of stairs and landings offering scenic views. Not overly strenuous but you need to be in desent shape to do it. In the photo my granddaughter and I made it to the top (as did our photographer, my wife).

    There are lots of hiking trails and campsites available as well as a lodge which I am told is quite nice with a good restaurant. We didn't stay there but might next time we go.

    At the top of the falls
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park
    • Mountain Climbing

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Dawsonville Hotels

Dawsonville Warnings and Dangers

  • rexvaughan's Profile Photo

    by rexvaughan Written Jun 22, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Amicalola Falls is worth the trip up, but it is a bit strenuous. After hiking about 1/2 mile up a fairly steep path you are confronted with this sign where the path turns to stairs. It is actually the easier part of the hike, but by the time you get here you can be worn out. If you can handle it, the view is spectacular.

    Be prepared to climb!
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park
    • Mountain Climbing

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Dawsonville Off The Beaten Path

  • jmpncsu's Profile Photo

    by jmpncsu Written Apr 23, 2014

    Dawson Forest is a 10,000-acre forest in Dawson County jointly managed by the City of Atlanta and the Georgia Forestry Commission. The forest is separated into five tracts and contains numerous waterfalls. The forest is truly off the beaten path and has a real wilderness feel. We spent an entire day here and never saw another person. However, the trails are blazed and there are signs at intersections to help hikers from getting lost. To visit the Wildcat Tract, head west from Dawsonville on GA-136 for about 11 miles and turn left on Steve Tate Highway. Go 2 miles and turn right onto Wildcat Campground Road and follow this gravel road just under a mile to the campground at the end. Just past the campground, pick up the green-blazed Wildcat Creek Trail to head into the forest. At about 1.4 miles from the trailhead, a footbridge leads over Wildcat Creek to Turner Trail. You can take this trail about a quarter-mile to Rocky Ford Creek Trail and head up to see two waterfalls on Rocky Ford Creek. Just before Rocky Ford Trail intersects Windy Ridge Trail, there is a small trail that leads down to the creek above the waterfalls. It's more of a bushwhack than an actual trail, but both waterfalls are pretty close to the trail.

    There are several waterfalls on the aptly named Fall Creek. If you continue on Wildcat Creek Trail past the bridge, the trail becomes Fall Creek Trail and there is a tricky creek crossing almost immediately. Luckily, there are some ropes attached to assist hikers in fording the creek. Right past the creek crossing, a spur trail splits to the right and leads to the fourth waterfall on Fall Creek. Continuing on Fall Creek Trail, the trail heads up a ridgeline and passes and intersection with Tobacco Pouch Trail. Past the intersection, the trail heads down into a cove and then back up. Bushwhack into the cove, staying on flat ground and heading upstream along the creek to see third waterfall on Fall Creek. Back on the trail, there is another creek crossing just above the third waterfall and in another half-mile or so, you'll reach Fall Creek Falls or second waterfall on Fall Creek. At 100-feet, it's the biggest and most impressive in the forest. There's another waterfall above this one, but we didn't have time to explore any further.

    Second Waterfall on Fall Creek Fourth Waterfall on Fall Creek Third Waterfall on Fall Creek Second Waterfall on Rocky Ford Creek First Waterfall on Rocky Ford Creek
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Photography
    • Hiking and Walking

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