Savannah Favorites

  • Plaque  near the Bell
    Plaque near the Bell
    by LoriPori
  • Factor's Walk
    Factor's Walk
    by LoriPori
  • Favorites
    by LoriPori

Most Recent Favorites in Savannah

  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    EMMETT PARK

    by LoriPori Written Nov 1, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Savannah has beautiful parks in and around the Historic District. EMMETT PARK and Forsyth Park are two of the largest and most well-known.
    Emmett Park which stretches for several blocks, was created as a tribute to the Irish patriot Robert Emmett (1778 - 1805).
    Emmett Park Monuments include - Chatham Artillery "Wahington Guns" - Celtic Cross - Harbor Light.
    And also one of the great features of this park are the beautiful giant Oak trees.

    Giant Oak Trees in Emmett Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    MAGNOLIA HALL

    by LoriPori Written Nov 1, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: As I strolled along East Bay Street, I came upon this charming building which had a plaque on it that identified it as MAGNOLIA HALL. Now there is another Magnolia Hall, a historic home, but after doing some research, I discovered that it is a tourist residence - a three bedroom - two-story home located in the Historic District at 417 East Bay Street, only one block from River Street and overlooking Emmett Park.
    The building had decorative iron railings and looked very old - perhaps early 1800's

    Was this review helpful?

  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    A BIT ABOUT SAVANNAH

    by LoriPori Updated Nov 1, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: October, 2014
    Established in 1733, SAVANNAH is the oldest city in the state of Georgia. A strategic port city, Savannah is today an industrial center and an important Atlantic seaport.
    Millions of visitors who enjoy the city's historic architecture, visit Savannah every year. October is a great time of year to visit this charming "Old South" city. The weather was fantastic and crowds not too bad. Hans and I enjoyed strolling down East Bay Street where most of the sites are located. You can experience "River Walk" along the Savannah River - be raptured by the beauty of the mighty oak trees just dripping with Spanish Moss - experience the historic sites - perhaps take a Trolley Tour.
    Georgian's mild climate offers perfect conditions for growing cotton, which became the dominant commodity after the American Revolution, Its production under the plantation system and shipment through the Port of Savannah, helped the city's European immigrants to achieve wealth and prosperity.

    Cotton Exchange Magnolia Hall
    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    SPANISH MOSS

    by LoriPori Written Nov 1, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The sight of SPANISH MOSS hanging from the Old Oak trees in the historic district of Savannah, epitomizes what I envision of this charming city.
    Spanish Moss is a flowering plant that grows on larger trees, commonly the Southern Live Oak or Bald Cyprus in the southeastern parts of the U.S. wherever the climate is warm enough and has a relatively high average humidity.
    The plant consists of a thin stem, bearing slender curly leaves, that grow in chain-like fashion, to form hanging structures up to 6 metres in length. The plant has no aerial roots and its flower are tiny and barely visible. It propagates both by seed and vegetatively by fragments that blow in the wind and stick to tree limbs.
    It is said that the Spanish Moss is actually harmful to the trees as they are not able to "breathe" and if there is a hurricane, the tree gets heavy from the moisture and is not able to sway and bend with the wind.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    SAVANNAH CITY HALL

    by LoriPori Written Nov 1, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: A plaque near the SAVANNAH CITY HALL reads:
    "City Hall is the first building constructed by the citizens of Savannah expressly by the citizens of Savannah expressly and exclusively to serve as the seat of municipal government.
    Opened on January 2. 1906, it has served continuously in this role since that date. City Hall was preceded on this site by the City Exchange, built in 1799 and razed in 1904. Along with municipal offices, the City Exchange housed the Custom House, a Post Office and newspaper offices.
    City Hall was designed by Savannah architect Hyman W. Witcover and built 1904-1905 by the Savannah Contracting Company during the administration of Mayor Herman Myers.
    It is a Renaissance Revival structure of granite and limestone exterior. The original copper dome was first gold leafed in 1987."

    The City Hall is located at 2 East Bay Street

    Savannah City Hall

    Was this review helpful?

  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    SAVANNAH RIVER - RIVER WALK

    by LoriPori Written Oct 31, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Forming most of the border between the states of South Carolina and Georgia, the SAVANNAH RIVER is a major river and is 301 miles long. Two major cities are located along the River - Savannah and Augusta, Georgia.
    RIVER WALK - you can stroll down Savannah's River Walk. There you will find restaurants, specialty shops and art galleries. As it was the weekend and it was a beautiful, sunny day, there were various street performers to entertain the crowds.

    View of the Savannah River

    Was this review helpful?

  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    CHATHAM ARTILLERY'S - WASHINGTON GUNS

    by LoriPori Written Oct 31, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Located in a Park on Bay Street, is the display CHATHAM ARTILLERY'S - WASHINGTON GUNS.
    The bronze cannons were presented to the Chatham Artillery by President George Washington after his visit to Savannah in 1741.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    FACTOR'S WALK - RIVER STREET PLACE

    by LoriPori Updated Oct 31, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Here you will find a unique collection of red brick buildings (pic #1) , once a center of commerce for Savannah's cotton brokers or factors, thus FACTOR'S WALK
    The top buildings contained the offices of the cotton brokers and the buildings on the lower River Street side were used as warehouses.
    A series of iron and concrete walkways - Factor's Walk - connected the buildings.
    Ramps leading from Bay Street and down the bluff to River Street, are paved with cobblestones. (as shown in Pic #2.)
    My favourite "rest stop" was on a park bench overlooking the River. Close by, was the ramp where tour trolleys continually made there way down to River Street.

    Factor's Walk
    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    SAVANNAH COTTON EXCHANGE

    by LoriPori Written Oct 30, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Built in 1886, the SAVANNAH COTTON EXCHANGE located at 100 East Bay Street, is a grand reminder of cotton's influence on the city.
    Built of red brick with a terra cotta facade, copper finials and copings and iron window lintels, the building is one of the best examples of the Romantic Revival Period.
    In the front of the Exchange building there is a statue of a griffin and a lovely fountain.

    Savannah Cotton Exchange
    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    OLD CITY EXCHANGE BELL

    by LoriPori Written Oct 30, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The OLD CITY EXCHANGE BELL was constructed in 1802 and hung in the Bell Tower of the City Exchange building on Bay Street. It is now located in a replica of the tower in a park on East Bay Street just east of the Old Cotton Exchange building
    The Bell wa used to signal all important occasions, but mainly rang in a case of fire, to announce council meetings and the closing time of businesses.

    The Old City Exchange Bell historical marker reads:

    "This bell, which is believed to the oldest in Georgia, bears the date 1802. Imported from Amsterdam, it hung in the cupola of the City Exchange from 1804 until a short time before that building was razed to make way for the present City Hall.

    In its day, the bell signalled the closing time for shops and was rung by a watchman when fire broke out. Its rich tones were heard in celebration of American victories during the War of 1812. It pealed a welcome to such distinguished visitors to Savannah as Monroe, LaFayette, Polk, Fillmore, Clay and Webster and it tolled tributes for America's illustrious dead.

    The tower of the City Exchange, where the bell hung, was a favorite resort of those anxious about the arrival of vessels. The replica of the tower in which the historic bell presently reposes was erected in 1957 through the combined efforts of the Savannah chamber of Commerce, the Pilot Club of Savannah and the Savannah-Chatham Historic Site and Monument Commission."

    Old City Exchange Bell Plaque  near the Bell

    Was this review helpful?

  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Forrest Gump

    by Dabs Written Nov 14, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Parts of "Forrest Gump" were filmed in Savannah, much of the story takes place as Forrest Gump, played by Tom Hanks, sits on a bench in front of Chippewa Square telling his story. I'm sure there are many tourists wandering through the square looking for "the bench" but don't bother, the movie bench is housed at the Savannah History Museum and there is no bench at all where the movie was filmed, just some pretty flowers.

    Chippewa Square

    Was this review helpful?

  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    "The Book"

    by Dabs Written Nov 14, 2010

    Favorite thing: It's almost a prerequisite that you have to read "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil", also known as "The Book", before heading to Savannah. I had read it many, many years ago and started to reread it before heading to Savannah, I didn't quite finish it but it was interesting to read in conjunction with the trip. I think the author may have taken a few liberties with the truth, in fact says as much at the end of the book. But it's still an entertaining look at some of the eccentric residents of Savannah and a murder. Or was it? That information died along with Jim Williams in 1980. Of course, "The Book" has been capitalized on in the form of tours featuring the sights in the book. I'm not quite sure where they take you but certainly the Mercer-Williams House where the murder takes place is on it. They may also take you by Clary's where Luther Driggers decides whether he is going to have breakfast, Club One where Lady Chablis still does her act, the Hamilton-Turner House, one of Joe Odom's many residences; and Bonaventure Cemetery which gives the book its title.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Live_4_Today's Profile Photo

    Savannah..............Time only makes it better!

    by Live_4_Today Written Mar 10, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Hello,
    I've traveled to Savannah several times, and I have to say the historic district is a very safe place to walk and explore. Before my first trip, someone suggested when I go, to plan a walking tour by starting at Bay Street and walking south on Bull all the way to Forsythe Park. You get to experience lots of shops, and the beautiful city squares this way, and get a real feel for the historic district.
    The Savannah History Museum on Martin Luther King Blvd. would be a great place to see some Civil War relics, and I HIGHLY suggest taking one of the many tours offered in town. The walking tours are lots of fun, but if you'd prefer not to walk, there are lots of trolley and carriage tours that will get you up to speed on some of the history about town.

    The Lady and Sons is a good place to eat, as are many of the restaurants on River Street. Our FAVORITE is Mrs. Wilkes dining room on Jones Street. It is only open at lunch time (11-2 I believe) and only takes cash, but you'll get the TRUE Southern dining experience there. No menu, just pass around lots of good home cookin' at the table with others. Great way to meet people. We also like the Pirate House on E. Broad Street. They have a delicious buffet at lunch, and a very nice menu for dinner. We've also had a wonderful meal at Belford's in the City Market.

    My husband's favorite haunt in town is the riverside. He loves sitting there watching the big ships come in and go out........and I get to shop at all the shops on River Street while he does that!

    Be SURE to either take a tour to Bonaventure Cemetery, or drive out yourself. It's NOT to be missed!

    Fondest memory: I just LOVE walking through the squares in town. It gives one the feeling of being a part of this old city.

    Beautiful monument at Bonaventure Cemetery The Bird Girl........you'll find her EVERYWHERE! Architectural detail on the Owens Thomas House A look down a spanish moss-lined avenue The Waving Girl Statue at the river
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

    Was this review helpful?

  • Pawtuxet's Profile Photo

    Tybee Island

    by Pawtuxet Updated Jan 21, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: With so much tree cover over the city, I imagine Tybee Island is a real treat for the people of Savannah. It's about a 20 minute drive outside the city...lots of summer homes, mud flats, and an entertainment strip...loads of hotels and motels.... typical summer playground.
    The part we found the best was the beach. It's a beautiful stretch of sugary sand with dunes, a pavillion, a board walk and plenty of room to stretch out or skip through the water.
    Unfortunately January isn't the best time to visit. Hot weather probably brings a zillion tourists and a lot of partying all over the island.
    The sunset was excellent.
    There is also a Tybee Island Lighthouse Station & Tybee Museum which might be interesting to see. We didn't take the time for it... the weather didn't lend itself to summertime actiivities.

    Related to:
    • Beaches

    Was this review helpful?

  • Pawtuxet's Profile Photo

    Congregation Mickve Israel (1733)

    by Pawtuxet Written Jan 20, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: I was struck by the architecture of this temple.... Mickve Israel, founded in 1733. At home we seldom see a temple with this type of architecture. I wished I could have gone inside to tour it, but noone was there. The sign tells us that this is the oldest now practicing Reform Judaism in the U.S.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Savannah

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

30 travelers online now

Comments

Savannah Favorites

Reviews and photos of Savannah favorites posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Savannah sightseeing.

View all Savannah hotels