Savannah Favorites

  • Architectural detail on the Owens Thomas House
    Architectural detail on the Owens Thomas...
    by Live_4_Today
  • The Waving Girl Statue at the river
    The Waving Girl Statue at the river
    by Live_4_Today
  • A look down a spanish moss-lined avenue
    A look down a spanish moss-lined avenue
    by Live_4_Today

Most Recent Favorites in Savannah

  • deecat's Profile Photo

    Savannah's Architecture

    by deecat Updated Apr 17, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Owen-Thomas House in Savannah

    Favorite thing: As I said in the introduction, Savannah is a joy for an architectural buff because much of the visual charm of the city's historic district is a result of the impressive 18th and 19th century styles of architecture which have been restored and preserved in cottages, churches, mansions, and public buildings.

    I'll just give you a few examples of the different styles I saw and recognized.

    The best example of the earliest Georgian period is the Davenport House (1790).
    It is located on the northwest corner of the Columbia Square. It is a Federal-style brick building with wrought iron touches. This beautiful home was almost destroyed in 1955 because, at that time, the home was derelict. Most people feel that this near incident was the catalyst for Savannah's historic preservation movement. (Located at 324 East State Street, 912-236-8097.)

    In the early 1800s, Savannah was a prosperous city, and this coincides with the Regency Period that adds grand flourishes to the Georgian sensibilities such as oval rooms, high ceilings, intricately carved moldings, and great marble fireplaces. The Owens-Thomas House is a grand example. The Owens-Thomas House is located on Oglethorpe Square at Abercorn Street. The National Trust for Historic Preservation calls this home, "Savannah's most sophisticated house, then and now." Today It's operated as a museum by the Telfair Academy of Arts and Sciences. (124Abercorn Street, 912-233-9743)

    Fondest memory: The next period of architecture was called Greek Revival and includes large colonnaded entrances and grand staircases associated with Southern plantation architecture. Many public buildings conform to this style.

    The Victorian Era revived row houses of a different sort, constructed with brick but without the delicate ornamentation of the Georgian period. Also, many wooden-frame houses with "gingerbread" accents fit this style. The 1886 Cotton Exchange remains as an example of this time period.

    Different ethnic groups who settled in the city also added to the interesting architecture. For instance, Wrought-iron balcony rails were brought to the city by the French who came to Savannah after fleeing slave rebellions in Haiti. The side-of-the-house gallery entrances came from Barbados, and peaked roofs came from the German Jews and Salzburg Protestants who were among the original settlers.

    The Massie Heritage Interpretation Center has exhibits concerning the city's architecture. (207 E. Gordon St, 912-651-7380)

    OK, Architectural Buffs, come visit Savannah!

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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  • deecat's Profile Photo

    Visit Fort Pulaski National Monument Near Savannah

    by deecat Updated Apr 17, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fort Pulaski National Momument

    Favorite thing: While in Savanna, be sure to visit
    Fort Pulaske: now Called Fort Pulaski National Monument

    The fort is located on Cockspur Island.
    Pass the junction of US 80 across Whitemarsh Island, Turner Creek, and Wilmington Island . (Tybee Road) crosses the Bull River. Near the approaches to Tybee is a turnoff (left) to the Fort

    There are 25 million bricks in Fort Pulaski, which, at the time, was thought to make it indestructible. This fort faces the sea, and early in the Civil War, it was captured by Confederate troops to protect blockade runners from attack by the Union Navy.

    So, the Federals made it a priority in their quest to win. They secretly hauled 36 cannons to Tybee Island and concealed the cannons in eleven batteries. By 1862, Fort Pulaski fell to the Union because they used new bullet-shaped artillery shells from more than one mile away! This incident changed the construction of forts.

    Today, this pentagonal redbrick fort is maintained by the National Park Service. With its seven-foot-deep moat surrounding it, the fort is an interesting site to tour.

    Fondest memory: The fort is an outstanding example of the 19th-century brick masonry fortifications constructed along the southern U.S. coast. It is built on massive pilings that are sunk deep into the salt marsh and mud. Guess who was the engineer who was in charge of its construction? None other than new graduate from West Point, Lt. Robert E. Lee!

    There is a museum on the site, and they regularly give living history demonstrations.

    This is a perfectly preserved National Monument and looks like a Medieval Fortress. It took 18 years to build this current structure.

    I was told on the tour that there is a yearly Labor Day Encampment that features garrison life, people in period costumes, and activities of the era.

    Open from Memorial Day to Labor Day: free to see the fort, but $1.00 charge in summer to see the Museum.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Public Buildings

    by grandmaR Updated Feb 25, 2007
    U. S. Post Office
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: under constructon

    The U.S. Post Office has Massive Georgia marble and granite building with intricate friezes under eaves. Many architectural ideas are combined here. Notice the tower with its marble arches and intriguing details.

    U.S. Customs House - 1-5 E. Bay Street

    Greek revival style building designed 1848-52 by John Norris. An austere granite temple with Tower-of-the-Winds portico.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Road Trip
    • Budget Travel

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  • draguza's Profile Photo

    Typical Southern Mansions

    by draguza Updated Dec 9, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mansion entrance

    Favorite thing: Savannah's historic district is adjacent to the Nantucket Clipper's dock on River Street. Savannah brims with southern cultural allure, drawing throngs in search of history, art, architecture and tradition, with emphasis on great houses, black heritage, ghosts and the Civil War era.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

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  • rexvaughan's Profile Photo

    Melt in your mouth pralines!

    by rexvaughan Written Jun 12, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: I never make a trip to Savannah without finding some of the wonderful pralines which are a Southern treat that I think actually has French origins. It is brown sugar, butter and pecans - how could you beat that combination?? You can find them several places, but I like Savannah Candy Kitchen which has locations at River Street and City Market. They also have delicious chocolate fudge and other sweets and nut treats to tempt you. Indulge!

    Fondest memory: Pralines -I have even asked friends who went to Savannah to bring me some back - some did!

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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Trolley Tours

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 7, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Greyline Red Tour Trolley

    Favorite thing: Originally, I intended to take the Gray Line tour, which is one of several available. They advertise that tours depart every 30 minutes from the Visitor's Center and Gray Line central (free parking). The Trolley Tour is a comprehensive, fully narrated tour uninterrupted by trolley stops. Enjoy a 75-minute journey through 260 years of Savannah's history, homes and haunts with unlimited on and off privileges at 12 trolley shuttle stops within the Historic District.

    In the end, I switched to Old Savannah Tours, and was very happy with them.

    Note in the photo - white bumps in the street around the stop sign which appears to be farther out into the street than usual

    Fondest memory: In addition to Grayline and Old Savannah, possible tours include:

    • Motorcoach & Van Tours
    Tours by BJ
    Old Town Trolley Tours

    • Sightseeing & Interpretive Guide Service
    Historic Savannah Foundation Special Tours
    Personalized Tours of Savannah

    • Guided Walking Tours (alphabetical order)
    Ghost Talk Ghost Walk
    Ghosts of Savannah walking tour
    The Original Savannah Walks Inc.
    Risky Venture Tavern Tour
    Savannah Haunted History Tours
    See Savannah Walking Tour
    Sixth Sense Savannah Ghost Tours
    Spirit of Savannah Tours

    • Boat Tours
    Savannah Riverboat Cruises
    Standard Bay Charters
    Tybee Island Adventures

    • Limousine Tours
    A1 Atlanta Limos
    G.R.A.C.E. Limousine Service
    Old Savannah Limousine Service
    Southern Comfort Limousine

    • Cemetery Tours
    Bonaventure Cemetery Tours

    • Dolphin Watching
    Tybee Island Adventures

    • Eco-Sensitive Tours ( Bull River Cruises from Tybee road)

    • Boat, Canoe & Kayak Rentals
    Captain Walt's Charters
    Net Cruzr Charters
    Savannah Canoe and Kayak

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Sailing and Boating

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  • kidkilowatt's Profile Photo

    A Bit Of Gory History

    by kidkilowatt Written Mar 31, 2005
    bullet holes

    Favorite thing: Stop by the Lucas Theater at 32 Abercorn and see if you can find the bullet holes from a supposed drive-by shooting in prohibition times in which several people (I think 11) were killed. The bullet holes are still there, just touched up a bit to make them less noticeable.

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  • kidkilowatt's Profile Photo

    Check Out That Iron Work...

    by kidkilowatt Written Mar 31, 2005
    Iron Work

    Favorite thing: There is a history behind Savannah's iron work and it can be seen all throughout the historic city. Just stop by fences or iron trims on the houses as you stroll through Savannah and admire the beauty of this iron work. If you are really interested, you should take a tour of the Savannah iron work.

    Try this website: www.seesavannah.com/iron2.htm

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  • kidkilowatt's Profile Photo

    Come With An Appetite

    by kidkilowatt Written Mar 31, 2005
    An Empty Plate

    Favorite thing: Serving sizes were huge in Savannah in most of the restauratns we visited, but everything is so good that it was hard to stop eating, even when we knew we should call it quits. Come to Savannah with an appetite and take advantage of all the great restaurant serving up hefty portions of local favorites.

    Fondest memory: Eating my way through the city...

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  • kidkilowatt's Profile Photo

    Don't Rush, Just Soak It All In...

    by kidkilowatt Updated Mar 31, 2005
    A Walking City

    Favorite thing: Savannah is such a beautiful city to walk around. Do walk as much as possible in soak in your surrounds. Living in New York, I see many benches but never before have I had the desire to sit down on one just to ponder or soak in the atmosphere. Savannah is such a wonderful place to just take a seat and be at peace with the world. Take advantage of the benches in Savannah's parks and squares.

    Fondest memory: Sunshine and blue skies can't be beat.

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  • brkilbourne's Profile Photo

    Skidaway Island

    by brkilbourne Written Nov 13, 2004

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The Science Museum is a wonderfull place for children, with an aquarium, short trail system and picnic tables. Can be added to visit to the Skidaway Island State park ( camping, trails, pool. or a walk in Wormsloe
    Plantatation

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  • zrim's Profile Photo

    A city of monuments

    by zrim Written May 1, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of Savannah's many monuments

    Favorite thing: Never before have I seen so many monuments in a U.S. city outside of Washington, D.C. They seem to dole out monuments to every Tom, Dick and Harry. I'd hate to have lived in 1700s Savannah and not have a monument. It seems like you'd have to have been a real loser not to warrant a monument.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

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  • zrim's Profile Photo

    A City of Parks

    by zrim Written May 1, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    one of Savannah's many parks

    Favorite thing: Never have I seen a city with so many small beautiful parks. In the downtown area between the river and Hall Street there are about 25 manicured parks. I picked a perfect time to visit as all the flowering trees were in bloom. The historic buildings give Savannah a certain oldworld charm, but for me what truly makes Savannah a stand out city is its parks.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

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  • tpangelinan's Profile Photo

    Savannah's historic district

    by tpangelinan Written Mar 13, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Savannah's historic district

    Favorite thing: Either take a bike, trolley, car or carraige ride, but you must go to the Historic District of Savannah. It's a wonderful place full of great photo shots at every turn, so bring your camera and lots of batteries. Great shops all along here, any thing you could want. Cheap to park, about 50 cent to $1.00 per hour and right on the water.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

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  • PA2AKgirl's Profile Photo

    Factors Walk

    by PA2AKgirl Updated Jan 15, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Factors Walk

    Favorite thing: Business used to be conducted from the decks of ships and wharfs, so cotton factors used to set up shop here on the W. side of Bay Street. These were the 1st offices and warehouses and the walk is named after the brokers (factors) who made this area wealthy initially. This really isn't my fondest memory, but it's a pretty street and you can't miss it if you're downtown at all. It's the way to get down to River Street.

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