Savannah Off The Beaten Path

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Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Savannah

  • GUYON's Profile Photo

    Bonaventure Cemetery

    by GUYON Written Aug 6, 2006

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    Gracie's watson's Grave
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    Savannah is inhabited by more dead perpersons than alive ones. Where can we meet more easily the gosts : at the cemetery. Though we are fans of the movie "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil" we skipped the Old Bonaventure cemetery which is featured in the film.

    We were curious to see the Gracie Watson's statue. She was the charming daughter of the Pulaski hotel manager and was friendly considered by the patrons of the hotel. Unfortunately, she died from pneumonia in April 1889. The statue of her grave was carved from a photographe as it is shown by her behaviour.

    The grave is fenced by railings to protect it from the visitor cheek. For the same reason, the famous statue, " the Bird Girl" has been moved from the cemetery when the family encountered tourists having a pick nick on the their grave.

    The Gracie's grave is signaled by wooden signs and it is located in section E number 98.

    The other occupiers of the graveyard are also interesting. Fort examples : Johnny Mercer and Conrad Aiken (both in section H).

    One thing more : the cemetery is not close to the city center. You need a map and a car except if you are in a tour.

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    Ft. Pulaski

    by Tom_Fields Updated Feb 18, 2006

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    Ft Pulaski
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    This old fort was built starting in 1808, to protect Savannah from naval attack. It saw action in the War of 1812, and during the Civil War. The Union Navy never made it past this fort. But in 1865, during his March to the Sea, General Sherman finally took Savannah, and its forts. Ft. Pulaski was decommissioned in 1905.

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    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

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    Tybee Museum

    by Tom_Fields Updated Feb 18, 2006

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    Fort Screven, now the Tybee Museum

    This museum describes the history of the area. It's located inside the former Ft. Screven, which once housed an Army garrison. From the time of the Spanish-American War until the end of World War II, US troops manned heavy coastal defense artillery batteries.

    In 1945, it was declared surplus property by the Army, and turned over to the town. Since then, it's been a museum. One of the heavy artillery pieces stands out front.

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    Tybee Island

    by Tom_Fields Updated Feb 18, 2006
    Tybee Island
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    Just down the river from old Savannah, on the coast, is Tybee Island. Not REALLY an island, but an escape from the city. Fine beaches, an imposing lighthouse, and interesting museum await you on Tybee Island.

    More Info:

    Tybee Island Online
    P.O. Box 2833
    Tybee Island, GA 31328

    Related to:
    • Beaches
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    • Architecture

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  • vhsdit03's Profile Photo

    SCAD rocks....

    by vhsdit03 Updated Jul 15, 2005

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    Most people go to Savannah to indulge in its history and to check up on sites such as the Waving Girl or Bird Girl statues. However, my trip was taken solely to visit the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD). Though originally my group's plan was to participate in SCAD's Sidewalk Chalk Art Festival, we became a bit discombobulated, and our dates were mistaken. It just so happened that the date we planned to visit was the date for an open studio show at a SCAD gallery.

    To our delight, the open studio was fabulous! The work was amazing, the sculptures/pottery was especially unique. Upstairs were many open air exhibits. Sadly, I couldn't take photos of students' work.

    The food was also great. I felt totally underdressed (in jeans and a tee, so was everyone else!) but it was soo classicly typical. There were guys going around with silver platters on their arms overing hor d'ouerves such as mini pieces of baklava. If ONLY I knew the caterers!

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    Universe Trading Co.

    by cfwestbe Written Jun 20, 2005

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    If you want antiques and other old stuff, head to Universe Trading Co. and check out the deals. Not all are antiques, but if you look you can find real gems of a deal.

    Located at 27 Montgomery Street, 1 block west of the City Market in historic downtown Savannah!

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    Go to a classic barber shop!

    by Dutchnatasja Written Jun 10, 2005

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    Barber Pole, a real barber shop

    Barber Pole; Best Barber Shop 2005

    This old fashioned Barber Shop has the traditional haircuts, hot lather shaves, razor cuts and more offered in the old fashioned style Barber Shop. The decor takes you back to a earlier more relaxed time when quality traditional haircuts were the order of the day. This is an old fashioned Barber Shop has all the service you would expect: shave, shoe shine, and a haircut for less than ten bucks.

    Address
    110 Bull St
    Savannah, GA 31401-3311

    Hours
    Mon-Fri 10am-6pm

    Payment Methods
    Cash, Check

    Related to:
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    Wormsloe Plantation

    by Dutchnatasja Updated Jun 8, 2005

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    A breathtaking avenue lined with live oaks

    Located approximately 10 miles southeast of downtown Savannah, the plantation was established in 1737 by Noble Jones, one of the first British colonists who arrived in Georgia with General James E. Oglethorpe. A plantation house built in 1828 stands at the site, as does the remains of the original house built by Noble. A museum displays artifacts.

    The entrance to Wormsloe Plantation is probably just what most Americans think of when talking about a Southern Coastal plantation. The picturesque arch leading to quiet country lane lined with live oak trees.

    Wormsloe Plantation is worth the drive if only to see the welcoming mile-long driveway lined with huge live oak trees.

    Address:
    State Historic Site
    7601 Skidaway Rd
    Savannah, GA 31406

    Directions:
    Take I-16 to exit 164A (I-516 / W. F. Lynes Pkwy). Take I-516 to the end, where it becomes S.R. 21, then continue on to Skidaway Rd, a total of 6.6 miles. Turn right on Skidaway and continue for 2.8 miles to the entrance to Wormsloe on the right.

    Hours:
    Tuesday–Saturday 9 a.m.–5 p.m.
    Sunday 2–5:30 p.m.
    Closed Monday (except holidays), Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years Day.

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    Bonaventure Cemetery

    by grandmaR Written Apr 7, 2005

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    Cemetery from the river in the spring
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    We've only seen Bonaventure Cemetery from the Wilmington River. It is easily reached by driving out Wheaton Street to Bonaventure road.

    Bonaventure ("good fortune" in French) was the good fortune of John Mulryne and Josiah Tattnall. Both were large landholders in Georgia, but they had much more in common than owning the land that became the cemetery. Mulryne, who built the third Tybee Lighthouse in 1773, was Tattnell's father-in-law. Bonaventure was his plantation home. The family cemetery on the plantation formed the nucleus of the present-day Bonaventure Cemetery. When Naturalist John Muir wrote about Bonaventure Cemetery in his 1867 book A Thousand Mile Walk to the Gulf, it was mostly the family cemetery today known as "Old Bonaventure."

    Famous people buried here include
    Conrad Aiken (poet)
    Robert Houston Anderson (Civil War CSA Brigadier General-after the war was a police chief in Savannah),
    Eugene Booth Jr. (nuclear physicist involved with the Manhattan Project)
    Duncan Lamont Clinch and Charles Edward Gorden (US Congress),
    Dr. Brodie Strachan Herndon (Civil War Confederate Army Officer - Chief Surgeon of the Confederate Army from 1862 to 1865. A graduate from the University of Maryland Medical School in 1829. He was the first person to perform a Caesarean operation in the United States)
    Henry Roots Jackson (Civil war general CSA)
    George Jones (U.S. Senator)
    Robert Alexander Lawton (Brigadier General, CSA)
    Rufus Ezekiel Lester (U.S. Congress),
    John T. McFarland (assistant surgeon of the Confederate Georgia Infantry and Sharpshooters)
    Hugh Weedon Mercer (Brigadier General, CSA)
    Johnny Mercer (Songwriter)
    James Neill (silent era actor)
    William Wiseham Paine (US Congress),
    Edward Fenwick Tattnall (US Congress),
    JosiahTattnall (Confederate Naval Officer. He commanded the Confederate ironclad "Virginia" (ex-"Merrimac")
    Edward Telfair (delegate to Continental Congress and Governor of Georgia)
    Thomas Telfair (United States Representative from Georgia, 1813-1817; son of Governor Edward Telfair)

    Related to:
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    Thunderbolt

    by grandmaR Written Apr 7, 2005

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    Rowing Practice on the River
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    In Thunderbolt, you have a scenic drive along US 80 (Victory Drive) featuring marsh, yachts, and shrimp boats with a huge live oak in the center of the road.

    When General James Oglethorpe settled in Savannah in 1733, he developed numerous smaller settlements in an "agrarian-military outpost scheme to protect the settlement of Savannah from the Spanish".

    Most of these outposts disappeared, but Thunderbolt was on a bluff was on the inland water route which led from Savannah south to St. Simons Island and Spanish Florida. Early detection of intruders could provide Savannah residents with the necessary time to prepare themselves for defense.

    According to Oglethorpe, the town was named after "a rock which was here shattered by a thunderbolt, causing a spring to gush from the ground, which continued ever afterward to emit the odor of brimstone."

    In 1778, the British captured Savannah without much opposition, but Thunderbolt remained in patriot hands. . The attack of the French and American on the British, the Siege of Savannah, lasted only about one hour, occurring along the western boundary of the city, and was a failure. The French lost one-hundred and fifty men and three-hundred and seventy were wounded. The American casualties were tallied at two-hundred and thirty killed or wounded, while the British lost only eighteen with forty wounded. The Battle of Bunker Hill was the only military conflict in the American Revolutionary War to exceed the combined casualties at the Siege of Savannah.

    In the Civil War, the Thunderbolt Battery was instrumental in the defense of Savannah. Thunderbolt never fell to the enemy, and increased armament and river obstructions kept the Union forces from landing. Nothing remains of the Thunderbolt Battery today due to a combination of initial neglect and commercial and industrial development.

    If you come to visit Bonaventure Cemetery, you will also be visiting Thunderbolt. There is also the Magic Mermaid which offers a dinner and gambling cruise.

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  • kidkilowatt's Profile Photo

    Bonaventure Cemetery

    by kidkilowatt Written Mar 21, 2005

    Bonaventure Cemetery may be one of the more hauntingly beautiful places I have ever been. I could probably have spent an entire day here, walking around and taking pictures of the sadly beautiful gravestones and just being quiet and pensive. I feel there is a lot to be learned about Savannah history in this cemetery and wish I could have spent more time, but we arrived in the late afternoon and have to get out before they closed us in for the night- Savannah being so full of ghosts and all. It was quite beautiful though to watch the sun going down through Spanish moss lined cemetery. Bonaventure Cemetery is a bit outside of Savannah and since Savannah is a walking city, you might not have a car to drive out. I suggest going, even if it means shelling out the money to take a cab. I think it cost us between 10 and 15 bucks each way, which is just over what it will cost you to take a trolley ride throughout the city which you could do walking at your own pace anyway. If you are into photography there are some incredible statues and monuments in the cemetery. Bring extra film, but stop clicking pictures every once and a while just to enjoy your peaceful surrounds.

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    Tybee Island

    by Azonie Written Feb 5, 2005

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    Tybee landscape

    Of course a trip to Savannah is never complete without visting Tybee Island..This place is definitely off the beaten path..However, it's VERY well known so it does get crowded on the weekends..The one thing about Tybee that's kind of sad is that there isn't enough night life there..Oh you have your local bars etc..but it's not same as having a fun night club to go to..Also it seems like EVERYTHING just closes right up around 9:00pm..If you want Quiet then Tybee is the place to go..I'll have more on Tybee in my other destinations section.

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  • Dutchnatasja's Profile Photo

    Visit a gallery and see Savannah like you've never

    by Dutchnatasja Written Nov 11, 2004

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    Photo by Jack Leigh

    Visit the gallery of Jack Leigh and see Savannah like you've never see it that way; see Savannah thru the eyes of Jack Leigh.

    Jack Leigh passed away in May 19th of 2004 after a battle with colon cancer. Having received numerous awards and accolades during his career he will continue to be an inspiration to all who crossed his path. His dedication to and love of photography inspired him to continue his work until his last days. His spirit will forever reside in the work he left behind. In 1993 Leigh was commissioned to create a photograph for the book cover of Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt. The book became an international best seller and the photograph is Leigh's most famous and widely recognized image. The gallery shows several black and white pictures of Savannah. They are so beautiful; you’ve must visit this gallery. The images were selected from the retrospective The Land I'm Bound To. They represent a cross-section of Jack Leigh's diverse bodies of work depicting the life and landscape of the Southeast.

    "With his beautifully executed, quiet images of the South, Mr. Leigh challenges the viewer to find beauty in something most people would just walk past" -- Allison V. Smith, Dallas Morning News --

    Gallery Hours
    Closed Mondays
    Tuesday - Saturday
    10:30am - 5:30pm
    Sunday
    1pm - 5pm

    132 E. Oglethorpe Ave.
    Savannah, GA 31401
    1.800.684.6509
    912.234.6449 | 912.238.3923 (fax)

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  • Dutchnatasja's Profile Photo

    Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil

    by Dutchnatasja Updated Nov 11, 2004

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    The Cover of the 1994 novel

    Read, before you go to Savannah, the novel "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil". The point reading this book is to acquaint you with the places and characters from Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil. It’s fun for everybody who has reading the book and wants to see its printed pages come to life. Some place you're are going to see along the way are the Mercer House, Jim Williams Antique Shop, Armstrong House, Clary’s café, Hamilton-Turner House and Club One. There are about 22 places in Savannah that you recognize in the book. Go walking around in Savannah and search for these places. It’s a nice way to discover Savannah.

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    Tybee Island

    by cobrioc Updated Aug 12, 2003

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    Tybee Island is only minutes from the Savannah Historic District. Offering some of South's best beaches and fantastic family values, Tybee is the eclectic jewel of the Georgia Coast. Enjoy boating, biking, hiking, or soaking up the rays on the beach. Combined with historic attractions, great shopping and extraordinary dining, Tybee is Georgia's small beach town.

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