Washington Things to Do

  • tourist office next to the fitzpatrick hotel
    tourist office next to the fitzpatrick...
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  • robert toombs house
    robert toombs house
    by doug48
  • 1891 jail
    1891 jail
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Most Recent Things to Do in Washington

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    Washington Presbyterian Church

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 8, 2014
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    The Presbyterian Church at Washington was organized in 1790, under the Presbytery of South Carolina, with the Rev. John Springer as first pastor. Services were held in private homes, in the Court House, the Academy, and in the Methodist Church, until 1825, when the first church edifice was erected. On July 29, of that year, the lot upon which the present church building stands was conveyed by Dr. Joel Abbott to Thomas Terrell, Samuel Barnett, Andrew G. Semmes, Constantine Church and James Wingfield, Trustees of Washington Presbyterian Church.
    The Georgia Presbytery was organized at a meeting of the South Carolina and Georgia Synod in Washington in 1821, and in 1826 the Synod met in the new church building. Many famous ministers have been pastors of the Washington Presbyterian Church, among them: the Rev. Alexander H. Webster, the Rev. S. J. Cassels, the Rev. Francis R. Goulding, the Rev. John Brown, the Rev. H. W. Petrie, the Rev. Nathan Hoyt, the Rev. J. K. S. Axson, and the Rev. Thomas Dunwoody. Alexander H. Stephens and Duncan G. Campbell were lifelong members of this church, as were many other distinguished men and women.

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    Dyson House

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 8, 2014
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    Built in 1820 by Harris Sandifer, the structure was a shop for Sandifer's harness making. The second owner, Frank Wingfield enlarged the original structure. The next owner, Isaiah Tucker Irvin II, enlarged it. After his death, his widow continued renovations. The structure, made of hand-planed virgin pine, was unpainted for the first one hundred years of its existence. For more information, see Standard, Janet Harvill, The historic homes of Washington, Georgia. Washington, Ga.: Wilkes Publishing Co., 1973.

    The house is part of the National Register's East Robert Toombs Historic District.

    Dyson House (Washington, Ga.)
    Sandifer-Wingfield-Irvin-Dyson House (Washington, Ga.)
    Old Castle (Washington, Ga.

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    Wilkes County Courthouse

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 8, 2014

    The current courthouse for Wilkes County, Georgia was completed in 1904 on the downtown square in Washington, Georgia, and originally included a taller, more detailed clock tower and roofline. A 1958 fire ravaged the top of the courthouse, leaving the building flat-topped for decades until the current roof and clock tower were added in 1989.

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    Holly Court

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 8, 2014

    Holly Court, also known as the Ficklin Home and Holly Court Inn Bed & Breakfast, is a historic Neoclassical architecture residence converted into a bed & breakfast in Washington, Georgia.[1] It was added to the National Register of Historic Places on April 11, 1972. It is located at 301 South Alexander Street

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    Toombs- Anderson Home circa 1820

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 8, 2014
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    Built by Sarah Hillhouse, whose impressive residence was just next door, this 1820 Classical revival style home served for many years as the home to Gabriel Toombs, brother of CSA Secretary of State Robert Toombs.

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    Campbell-Jordan-Lindsey-Farnell House

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 8, 2014
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    The original cottage was built by William Stith after 1787 and in 1807 purchased by Duncan Campbell who enlarged it. The western part of the structure was probably built by Judge Albert Gallatin Semmes. In 1841, Aaron A. Cleveland added the colonnade.

    Listed in the National Register as the Campbell-Jordan House, at 208 Liberty Street.

    Slide annotated: "Washington, Ga A greek revival house 2 front doors."

    Date of structure: 1787

    Campbell-Jordan House, also known as the Campbell-Jordan-Lindsey-Farnell House, is a historic residence in Washington, Georgia.[2] It was added to the National Register of Historic Places on July 14, 1971. It is located at 208 Liberty Street.
    The Federal architecture-style home was built in 1787 and underwent a Greek Revival architecture-style makeover in 1841, including the addition of large columns. The original cottage was built by William Stith after 1787 and was bought in 1807 by Duncan Campbell who enlarged it.[2] The western part of the structure was likely built by Judge Albert Gallatin Semmes.[2] In 1841, Aaron A. Cleveland added the colonnade.[2] The home was the residence of U.S. Supreme Court Justice and C.S.A. Assistant Secretary of War, John Archibald Campbell.

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    Home of Sarah Hillhouse

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 8, 2014
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    This Federal style house was begun in 1814, by Sarah Porter Hillhouse who came to Washington in 1786, from Connecticut with her husband David. In 1801, David purchased the town's first newspaper The Monitor, and when he died in 1803, Sarah became the first woman in Georgia to edit and publish a newspaper which she continued to run for more than a decade, along with the print shop her husband had established. Here she also printed the official records of the state legislature. Articles in The Monitor, which generally had a circulation of 700 to 800, give a vivid account of events of interest to the people of Washington in the early 1800's. Mrs. Hillhouse's other business interests included trading in land and commerce. Her letters provide an interesting insight to life in early Washington. She was a successful businesswoman at a time when women were seldom active outside the home, and she helped to build a frontier village into a thriving community.
    Her home was enlarged to its present form in 1869, when Gabriel Toombs acquired the property, and moved the end rooms from the Toombs Plantation on log rollers and added them to the house. Toombs and his descendants lived here for more than a century.
    Sarah began building the center section of this lovely Georgian style house in 1814.
    Her home was enlarged to its present form in 1869, when Gabriel Toombs acquired the property, and moved the end rooms from the Toombs Plantation on log rollers and added them to the house. I was warmly welcomed to the home by the present owner, Betty Slaton, who graciously shared her Sarah Hillhouse research with me on a rainy spring afternoon.

    David was buried in Washington at a grave site on early family property, the graveyard was built over by the town many years ago. Sarah died in Washington on 26 March 1831 surrounded by her children and grand children. She was buried in Major Shepherd's graveyard in a field SW of his house and not far from the tan yard. Today the location is unknown.

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    Mary Willis Library

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 8, 2014
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    The Mary Willis Library is a historic public library located in the city of Washington, in the U.S. state of Georgia. The library, located at 204 East Liberty Street (corner of East Liberty and South Jefferson) in downtown Washington, is the designated public library for Wilkes County and headquarters of the Bartram Trail Regional Library System. Built in 1889 in red brick and featuring Tiffany glass, the Mary Willis Library was listed with the U.S. National Register of Historic Places on April 11, 1972
    The Mary Willis Library was the first free public library in the state of Georgia when it opened in 1889. The free library was a revolutionary concept in a day when all the state's earlier libraries charged users a subscription fee.[2] The library was founded the previous year by Dr. Francis T. Willis in memory of his daughter, Mary. Dr. Willis, a local by birth who had moved to Richmond, Virginia in 1867, left the library as a gift to his hometown and its citizens. Dr. Willis donated his own private collection of books, plus fifteen thousand dollars for the library's construction, two thousand dollars to purchase furnishings and more books, and another ten thousand dollars as an endowment fund.
    Noted Atlanta architect Edmund George Lind designed the library in the Queen Anne style, with masonry construction featuring detailed brickwork, a steeply gabled roof and a dome-capped tower. The library interior is lit by stained glass windows, including the central memorial window which was crafted by Tiffany Studios. The historic original 1889 construction covered a size of 2,655 ft2 (246.7 m2).[3]
    By 1977, the facility had outgrown its original space, and an addition was needed. Architects Kuhlkhe and Wade of Augusta designed an annex which was attached to Lind's historic original structure. This first annex added 4,459 ft2 (414.3 m2) of floor space.[3] A second, even larger addition of 5,267 ft2 (489.3 m2) was completed in 1991, designed by architect Edmund Maddox of Savannah.[4] Today's facility, at 12,381 ft2 (1150.2 m2) is over four and a half times the size of the original.
    The collection at Mary Willis Library includes at its core a number of rare books on local and state history, books by authors native to the Washington-Wilkes County area, genealogical archives, and historic memorabilia and newspapers from Washington's past.[4]

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    The Robert Toombs House

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 8, 2014
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    HOURS: Tours are offered 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Operated by Wilkes County.

    A legend in his own time, Robert Toombs was a successful planter and lawyer who led a turbulent career as state legislator, U.S. Congressman and Senator. “Defend yourselves; the enemy is at your door . . . !” thundered Toombs from the Senate floor on January 24, 1860. The following year, Georgia seceded from the Union and Toombs personified the South by evolving from conservative Unionist to fire-breathing secessionist. After serving just five months as Confederate Secretary of State, he resigned to serve as brigadier general in the Army of Northern Virginia.

    In 1870, as the Reconstruction Era drew to a close in Georgia, Toombs felt that Georgia should live under a constitution of her own making. His last service to Georgia citizens was helping create the Constitution of 1877, which was not amended until 1945. Visitors are welcome to tour the house and grounds, and view exhibits and displays.

    Hours: Tuesday through Saturday / 9AM-5PM.
    Tours are available from 10AM-4PM
    Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day.
    GeorgiaStateParks.org/RobertToombsHouse

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    tourist office

    by doug48 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    tourist office next to the fitzpatrick hotel

    when visiting washington a good place to start is the washington tourist office. the tourist office is located on washington square across the street from the courthouse next to the fitzpatrick hotel. here you can get a map of the historic homes and buildings in washington.

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    robert toombs house

    by doug48 Updated Oct 26, 2010

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    historically, the robert toombs house is the most interesting house in washington. robert toombs was a georgia senator prior to the civil war. an avid secessionist, toombs declared on the on U.S. senate floor "defend yourselves, the enemy is at your door !" toombs served as the first secretary of state for the confederacy and later was a general in the army of northern viginia. after the civil war he helped create the georgia constitution in 1877. this beautiful antebellum home is a must see site for those interested in civil war history when in washington. open to the public.

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    confederate civil war memorial

    by doug48 Updated Aug 13, 2008

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    confederate civil war memorial

    located on the grounds of the courthouse is the wilkes county confederate civil war memorial. this statue is a very common motif in the south.

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    hillhouse-slaton house

    by doug48 Written May 1, 2008

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    hillhouse-slaton house

    pictured is the beautiful hillhouse-slaton house. it is one of a number of beautiful antebellum homes in downtown washington.

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Washington Things to Do

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