Hawaii (State of) Local Customs

  • Local Customs
    by cjg1
  • Local Customs
    by cjg1
  • Local Customs
    by cjg1

Hawaii (State of) Local Customs

  • Different Cultures in Hawaii

    Honolulu Local Customs

    hawaii truly is a melting pot of cultures! why? since hawaii is the ONLY minority-majority State in the United States where asian-americans, pacific islanders are the majority over caucasians and african americans and latinos. that is why you see a very small chinatown in honolulu and that you will see assorted asian, pacific islander, mainstream...

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  • Sacred Sites

    Kailua-Kona Local Customs

    Just to the north of St. Peter's Catholic Church on Ali'i Drive, this altar stands as a temple solely to the art of surfing. Here, offerings were made asking for gnarly surfing conditions. Even today, offerings are left, though now it is left by locals of all social standings. Long ago, surfing was a sport only for the royalty. Commoners caught...

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  • Ceremonies

    Waikiki Local Customs

    7 Feb 04 2045 Tonight we went to dinner and met this crazy middle-aged woman who was born in Australia, but raised in the US. I was given a lai (spelling??) by a big Hawaiian waitress. For good luck I had to give it away, but unfortunately I picked someone who didn't speak English (Easy to do in Waikiki due to the huge amounts of Japanese...

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  • Hawaiian Shirts

    Hilo Local Customs

    I don't think this picture has much to do with cultural tips, ha,ha.... But I liked it, and had to put it somewhere... ;-)) At least it is in the right City ;-)) .... We did stop at this store, in Hilo to do a bit of shopping.

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  • Thurston Lava Tube

    Volcano Local Customs

    Not a cultural tip, just needed more space to show more...... This Lava tube is enormous, and although there is lighting, it helps if you have a torch. Otherwise it's difficult to see the puddles of water.

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  • Lava Grafitti

    Hawaii (Big Island) Local Customs

    The Big Island is Hawaii's place for Big Drives, so it's nice to be entertained by lava graffiti. Don't worry -- there is no paint involved. Rather, people gather up white coral stones on the beach and take them to roadside lava deposits where they write words and draw pictures. The white stands out well against the dark black lava, creating the...

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  • Hawaiian Traditions

    Oahu Local Customs

    I love that there are free local guides and maps available on the street, in hotels at the airport and cruise ports. These are little gems of information of the area and the local happenings. There are also some great coupons and savings in many of the guides. Definitely pick them up where available; you never know what you might find useful.

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  • Talking Hawaiian

    Honolulu Local Customs

    Ok so this tip isn't exactly about how to speak "Hawaiian" itself, but more like what to expect when hearing locals talk. I myself DON'T speak "pidgin", but i know enough words to be able to understand what people are saying! :P My definitions should be pretty accurate, and I'll try to give some of the best examples I can! Some common...

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  • Hawaiian Dance

    Kailua-Kona Local Customs

    This pic was taken on my last night here. Sonja danced her Beautiful Traditional Hawaiian Dance, before the 'Hot Lava' Show began. She then wrapped her gorgeous 'Fresh Plumeria Lei' around me. She puts a lot of love into making her own Leis, and I was honoured to wear it ;-) ....... One very important tip, You must wear flowers in your hair Girls...

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  • Music

    Waikiki Local Customs

    This was a concert of a Hawaiin band outside the zoo at the park. It was a great band and great time partying with the locals. Mahalo.. The banner says "THE WILDEST SHOW IN TOWN" sponsored by AT & T.

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  • Tourist Booths

    Hawaii (Big Island) Local Customs

    When giving a lei in Hawaii it is tradition to accompany the gift with a kiss on the cheek. The wearer will be the center of attention and it is said that you will exprience good luck by passing your lei on to someone else.

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  • Hawaiian History

    Oahu Local Customs

    Throughout Oahu and many of the other islands you'll get a glimpse of a "canoe" or "kayak" that will have an outrigger. An outrigger is a rigging that is placed in a fixed position outside of the main hull. The more common outriggers in Oahu are the flat hollow floats that stabilize the canoes and kayaks. The outrigger floats form a narrow second...

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  • Leaving shoes at the Door

    Honolulu Local Customs

    People in Hawaii have adopted the Japanese custom of taking off your shoes at the door of a house. It makes sense when you think about what you've been walking through (ewww), and you'll feel more comfortable without shoes, anyway. It is considered VERY gauche to enter someone's home with your shoes on. The line-up of shoes outside the door will...

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  • Kilauea

    Hawaii (Big Island) Local Customs

    I want to tell you a story about Madame Pele. She is the Goddess of fire who makes her home in the Kilauea Crater. When angry she vents it by spitting fire and lava, thus creating the Hawaiian Islands. Wow, thats one peeved chick! She is able to take human form and usually appears before an eruption as either a beautiful young woman or as an old...

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  • Hawaiian Superstations

    Oahu Local Customs

    The Kukui nut lei is made from the Kukui Nut Tree.The Kukui Nut Tree is also known as the Candlenut Tree and in ancient Hawai’i the nuts were burned to provide light and the oil also has many cooking and medicinal uses. The nuts are used also in necklaces (leis) and bracelets. The colors of the nuts can be black, brown or white and often painted...

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  • Lei & Hula greeters

    Honolulu Local Customs

    Getting off the plane at Honolulu Airport all of us got a lei . We were told our silk leis will be a happy reminder of the Hawaiian vacation and the wonderful Island spirit of Aloha! The silk flowers are suitable also for people who might be allergic to flowers.

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  • Torch Lighting Duty

    Oahu Local Customs

    The free visitor guide and coupons are an excellent way to familiarize yourself with the area as well as plan a particular event. Many of the guides have discounted coupons which can be very valuable on things like meals and activities. It's easy to find these guides. When you're arriving at the airport you'll see racks and racks of these guides...

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  • Water Sports

    Hawaii (Big Island) Local Customs

    The outrigger canoe is the traditional boat of Hawai'i and is still quite popular. On the shores of Hilo bay you find many canoe club 'sheds' full of various length canoes. You'll also find a few on the Kona side too. Kona resident and fellow VTer, enigma58, was kind enough to let me take her one person canoe out on Keauhou Bay. As you can see from...

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  • Hawaiian Hula/Luaus

    Oahu Local Customs

    When in Hawaii, definitely try a Lava Flow. The Lava Flow is a delicious drink made from Rum, pureed strawberries, coconut cream and coconut milk. It basically tastes like a Strawberry Pina Coladad but better. My wife loves these Lava Flows and has to have them whenever we are in Hawaii. Her favorite place for a Lava Flow is the Plantation Bar at...

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  • Hawaiian Treats/Candy

    Oahu Local Customs

    My wife and I love our syrup on Pancakes, French Toast and waffles; usually maple syrup. Our last trip to Hawaii we branched out and tried some tasty Coconut and Guava syrup; which surprisingly we both like immensely. We found some of these syrups in a local store and bought a few bottles to take home

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  • Hawaiian Language

    Oahu Local Customs

    There is an actual law that was passed by the Hawaii Legislation in 1986 that states each citizen is obliged to conduct themselves with the Spirit of Aloha while at work and at home. I know we were paying tourists but everywhere we went the people were warm and welcoming. No where on the islands did we ever encounter rude or threatening behavior. I...

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  • Travel Tips

    Oahu Local Customs

    Hawaii does not observe daylight savings time that occurs in most of the states of the US. WHen Daylight savings time occurs HAwaii is not affected. Hawaii is 3 hours behind the West Coast of the US during daylight savings time so adjust accordingly. I almost forgot this small detail on my last trip to the islands.

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  • Hawaiian Flowers/Trees/Wildlife

    Oahu Local Customs

    These trees can be seen all over the island, what’s unique about them it’s their hanging branches that put roots once reached the ground. Some trees are very old and occupy quite some big, for a tree, territories. Birds seem to like its fruit and therefore hide inside the tree, although making lots of noise. Here’s one invaluable tip: avoid...

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  • Food of all Races

    Oahu Local Customs

    The plate lunch is a popular meal which is usually quite cheap. It typically comprises of two scoops of rice, macaroni and a choice of meat which varies from pork, teriyaki beef and different variations of chicken. There are a variety of dishes which are now called "plate lunches", so it varies on where you eat. Some places to enjoy an...

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  • Weddings

    Oahu Local Customs

    If you ever have the luck of being invited to a Hawaiian wedding - GO FOR IT! One of the most beautiful experiences we have ever had was attending our cousin's wedding at the beach in Oahu. Clear blue skies and water mixed with soft sand between our toes, and an overall atmosphere of peaceful calm. Then the bride's arrival was announced via the...

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  • Attire

    Oahu Local Customs

    Hawaii is one of the most casual places in the United States and for almost all dress-up occassions, aloha attire is acceptable -- even de riguer. This includes weddings, business meetings, fancy dinners out, etc. Often for formal affairs, the invitation will call for "crisp aloha" which means dressy pants (rather than just dockers) and a tucked-in...

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  • Museums/Art

    Oahu Local Customs

    Another thing I learned while touring the Bishop Museum. The tiny Hawaiian guitar that can be purchased in almost every souvenir shop is called “Ukulele”. This isn’t its original name and Hawaii it’s not its home either. Ukulele came to Hawaiian Islands with first Portuguese settlers and its original name is “braguinha”, now try to get a native...

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  • Street Preformers

    Oahu Local Customs

    The main drag along Waikiki Beach, Kalakaua Boulevard, is a common place to see performance artists hoping that their behavior will earn them some money. As Kalakaua is the most touristy street on Oahu, it's not surprising that mimes, balloon artists and other tricksters are drawn there. I once saw a guy dressed entuirely in newspaper -- I wonder...

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  • Hilton Hawaiian Village

    Oahu Local Customs

    The Blue Hawaiian is my favorite drink to have here while in Oahu. I enjoy the frozen Blue Hawaiian and will usually find my favorite at the Pikake Terrace at the Sheraton Princess Kaiulani. The Blue Hawaiian was actually invented here on the island of Oahu at the Hilton Hawaiian Village in 1957 by Harry Yee a legendary head bartender at the...

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  • Shopping

    Oahu Local Customs

    As several beaches on Oahu are dog-friendly (especually Kailua Beach), more people are bring their dogs to enjoy the sand and surf. Yet, like humans, dogs eyes are sentive to the sun and if they get too much exposure they could end up with cataracts. Therefore, it is becoming increasingly common to see dogs with sunglasses. You can buy them in the...

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  • Hang Loose - Shaka

    Wherever we went, there would be someone giving us a Hang Loose/Shaka sign with there hand. It was really nice to see and receive. It's like giving the thumbs up or waving really. Hawaiians use the shaka as a sign of friendship and solidarity. When someone put their arm out of the car window to us using the shaka, it was kind of like, thank you for...

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  • Bringing home food after parties:...

    This is one of the Filipino custom in Hawaii. If you attended parties, it is okay to bring home food. The family of the celebrant usually prepares a lot of food- usually double the attendees. This way, the attendees can bring home (take out) food!The practice, however, is to bring home food after all the guests have eaten and there are still left...

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  • Filipino birthdays in Hawaii

    It is customary to give money in an envelope instead of gift boxes when you attend birthdays, baptismals, weddings in Hawaii. The custom and tradition are to give enough money to pay for what you had eaten! If the parties were held in the house, the average money given is $20 per person but when the parties are held in hotels, it is best to give a...

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  • The Filipino food in Hawaii

    Eighty five percent of the population of Hawaii are Filipinos. So, of course, you will find thousands of Filipinos living in all the islands of Hawaii. You can hear them speaking in Ilocano, Visayan or Tagalog. There are many Filipino restaurants in the island but I love mostly the homecooked meals! When I go to Hawaii, I attend parties and eat all...

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  • The Hawaiians take pride of their...

    There are so many flowers in Hawaii and they string them into leis and given to tourists and visitors, to friends and relatives on graduations, birthdays, weddings, retirement parties, conferences, conventions, meetings, funerals, etc. Most of the leis are made of plumerias and orchids (pikakis). Some are made of the buds of sweet smelling...

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  • Spam

    Spam is bizarrely popular in Hawaii... according to the Waikiki Spam Jam website it is the Spam capital of the USA. Something to do with the War and the fact that it keeps well apparently. Sadly I was not there for the Waikiki Spam Jam event.

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  • Wearing of the leis

    Special occasions like birthdays, weddings, etc., the locals tend to dress up with their nice Aloha shirts and Mumu dresses with matching leis!The leis are made of Pikaki flowers and these are very expensive. They smell so good, too!The cheaper leis are made from plumeria.There are many flower stores in Hawaii that sells this leis and can be...

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  • The Slippahs (slippers)

    Most of the locals wear slippers even when they go downtown. It is a very casual thing to do. The residents don't bother to put on their shoes. They just slip on their slippahs and off they go!This is nice because the locals don't have to deal with the change of seasons! Most of the residents don't have foot problems either!

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  • The Mumu Dress

    Most of the local women dress in Mumu - a very comfortable dress. Most of the designs of the dresses are the hibiscus flowers, palm trees, puka shells, sea turtles, etc.The dress is long with short sleeves. It is an easy cut dress that keeps the person cool the whole day long!

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  • The Pidgin English

    Most locals speak the Pidgin English so don't be surprise to hear those while you are taking the bus. There are many cultures and ethnic groups living in Hawaii and they surely changed the English language. Here are some of the words you might like to know:1. Where you went? (It means where are you going?)2. Brahdahs and sistahs -means brothers and...

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  • Right if your single!

    If you are single make sure to put the flower over your right ear....if your not than....you know what to do!

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  • Eat breadfruit!

    While walking down the Aloha Tower, a breadfruit just fell down in front of us! I was so glad the fruit didn't fall on my daughter's head. Sierra gladly picked up the fruit! Anyway, the breadfruit tree has huge leaves and has huge fruits. The local people gather them to eat. The riped fruits get bigger. The fruit is boiled and the meat of the fruit...

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  • Relax. Slow down. Take your...

    Relax. Slow down. Take your time. Get into local time by slowing down. Walk slower. Drive slower. This might not sound like much in the way of advise, but it's something that's hard for a lot of us mainlanders to do. In order to really see Hawaii with your eyes, ears, nose, taste and touch you have to take the time to do it. Aloha.Visit the Hawaii...

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  • Listen closely to Locals when...

    Listen closely to Locals when they talk...or you will miss what they are saying! Brah...you bedda put on those slippahs (flip-flops) and grab your stick (surfboard) so you can hang ten!

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  • Learn to Speak Proper Hawai‘ian

    Every syllable ends with a vowel. Every consonant is separated by a vowel.Only 13 letters in their alphabet:A, E, I, O, U, H, K, L, M, N, P, W, and ‘That last character is considered by linguists to be a consonant in the Hawai‘ian language. It is the ‘okina and not just a punctuation mark. View all pictures for more Hawai‘ian grammar...

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Hawaii (State of) Local Customs

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