Local traditions and culture in Maui

  • Local Customs
    by cjg1
  • Local Customs
    by cjg1
  • Mago, Guava and Orange Shave Ice (2/2013)
    Mago, Guava and Orange Shave Ice...
    by cjg1

Most Viewed Local Customs in Maui

  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    Local Rum

    by cjg1 Written Aug 2, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When in Maui; try some of the locally produced Rum. There are many varieties available from several Rum producers on the island. My wife and I enjoy trying local products when visiting an area.

    The Maui Rum is produced from the local sugar can and is available in just about any store that carries liquor. Both my wife and I enjoy Rum drinks so finding so local rum to try is always a highlight for us.

    Was this review helpful?

  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    Free Local Guides and Maps

    by cjg1 Written Jul 29, 2013

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Free Local Guides and maps are available on the street, at visitor centers and at the airport. Take advantage of the local happenings, attractions, shopping and dining suggestions; you never know what you might find.

    Was this review helpful?

  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    Shave Ice

    by cjg1 Updated Mar 8, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Shave ice an ice-based dessert made by shaving a block of ice. Shave Ice is mostly credited as being "Hawaiian" but is actually Japanese in origin. It does look like a snow cone but the ice is shaved into a soft texture that resembles snow while a snow cone is crushed ice. This snowy texture is perfect for absorbing the flavored syrup, instead of it pooling at the botton of the cup.

    Personally I think this is a must have for anyone visiting Hawaii, It really is a treat and comes in so many different flavors.

    Was this review helpful?

  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    Kukui Necklaces

    by cjg1 Written Mar 7, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Kukui nut lei is made from the Kukui Nut Tree.The Kukui Nut Tree is also known as the Candlenut Tree and in ancient Hawai’i the nuts were burned to provide light and the oil also has many cooking and medicinal uses. The nuts are used also in necklaces (leis) and bracelets. The colors of the nuts can be black, brown or white and often painted with decorative colors.

    The meaning of kukui is a symbol of enlightenment, protection and peace. During our travels to Hawaii my wife has bought several Kukui nut leis for herself, friends and family; it makes a great souvenir gift.

    Was this review helpful?

  • cjg1's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    Tasty Mai Tais

    by cjg1 Updated Mar 7, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Mai Tai first came a popular cockatial in the 1950's and 1960's. The popular Elvis film Blue Hawaii featured this Tiki inspired drink. I am a big fan of Mai Tai's and love having them when visiting Hawaii. I've had them at almost every bar or restaurant I have visited and served in a variety of glasses from highball to interesting Tiki heads and coconuts. My favorite Mai Tai's so far have been at the Tiki Grill(Oahu), Hula Grill(Oahu & Maui) and the Pikake Terrace(Oahu).

    A Ma Tai is composed of: white rum, orange curacao, Ogeat syrup, rock candy syrup, lime juice and dark rum.

    Was this review helpful?

  • cjg1's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    Try a Lava Flow

    by cjg1 Updated Mar 7, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When in Hawaii, definitely try a Lava Flow. The Lava Flow is a delicious drink made from Rum, pureed strawberries, coconut cream and coconut milk. It basically tastes like a Strawberry Pina Coladad but better. My wife loves these Lava Flows and has to have them whenever we are in Hawaii. Her favorite place for a Lava Flow is the Plantation Bar at the Hula Grill Waikiki and the Beach Bar at the Hula Grill in Maui; according to my wife they make the best ones since they use fresh coconut milk.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Roadquill's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    Respect the Aina

    by Roadquill Written Dec 7, 2012

    Aina is "land" in Hawaiian. The intent is to leave Hawaii as you found it, as the magical place it is. That said, there are a lot of mixed messages. It is common to find memorials to locals overlooking a beautiful view. Not making any judgements here, I'm just sayin......

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Roadquill's Profile Photo

    Spam

    by Roadquill Written Dec 7, 2012

    Way before spam became the e mail nuisance affecting your everyday living, the Hawaiians turned spam into a delicacy. From a casual reading, it appears a leftover (pun intended) of the GI days of WW 2, when Spam was included in the rations of the GI soldiers stationed on Hawaii.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Arts and Culture
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • keida84's Profile Photo
    2 more images

    Flower Leis

    by keida84 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    On my very first trip to Hawaii, I was told by an native Hawaiian (and there are not that many true native Hawaiians left these days) if you want to ensure a safe return back to the islands, when you leave to toss your lei but first remove them from the string and then toss the petals into the ocean.

    Each of the Hawaiian Islands has their own color and flower. Maui's island color is: Pink and the flower is the: Lokelani (Maui Rose).

    Well now after countless visits back to the Islands of Hawaii I make sure that when we arrive everyone gets a lei and that upon our departure we toss the petals into the ocean and thank the spirits of the islands for their hospitality.

    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Arts and Culture
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

    Was this review helpful?

  • BLewJay's Profile Photo

    The Road to Hana

    by BLewJay Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Any trip to Maui is not complete until you have traveled the road to Hana. This part of Maui is totally different from the touristy side of the island as you travel along the infamous Hana Highway as it hairpins its way through one of Hawai'i's most beautiful tropical rainforest.

    The mileage to Hana isn't too bad (the roundtrip from Kahului is 126 miles and 175 miles from Lahaina), but the road is narrow, driving is slow, there are many 1 lane bridges and the scenery is very seductive.

    Once you get to Hana, explore the town then continue on (about ten miles) to Ohe'o Gulch. A few miles past Ohe'o Gulch is the burial site of Charles Lindbergh located at the Palapala Ho'Omau Congregational Church.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • rodrigonp's Profile Photo

    Aloha... Mahalo

    by rodrigonp Updated Mar 21, 2007

    If you haven't been to Hawaii yet you probably will have some doubts about the language and its particularities. I recommend buy a hawaiian dictionary because many words that local people (kamaaina) are used to speak have origin in the hawaiian language.

    If you hear some words that you have never heard before don't think you are crazy. For example, "Mahalo" instead of "Thank you"; "Lanai" instead of "Porch"; "Pal" instead of "Done"; "Kamaaina = Local people"; "Haule = foreign" etc.

    A hawaiian dictionary it's also a great suvenier from Hawaii. ;)

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • TheTravelSlut's Profile Photo

    It used to be a custom, not anymore unfortunately

    by TheTravelSlut Written Oct 19, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Stones used to be stacked near the entrance to the trail leading to the blowhole on the north end of the island (about 5 miles beyond Kapalua).

    Many that passed this way wondered what the purpose of the stones were when in actuality, there was no "purpose" but they sure looked great.

    It is unfortunate that the trail to the blowhole has been fenced off. The force of the water coming up through the blowhole helped create many of the rocks and stones that were used in the stacks.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • kalanialoha's Profile Photo

    Be prepared when you ask for directions...

    by kalanialoha Written Oct 7, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In Hawaii, we don't really go by conventional directions of North, South, East, or West. When you ask a local for directions you'll probably hear "makai" (towards the sea) or "mauka" (towards the mountain) for North or South. East or West is usually designated by town names. Example: West on Maui = towards Lahaina or Kapalua...East on Maui = towards Hana.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • kalanialoha's Profile Photo

    Take off your shoes before entering local homes

    by kalanialoha Updated Oct 7, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In Hawaii, we always remove our shoes before entering anyone's home. This is a sign of respect. Don't worry, no one's going to take your shoes. It may be hard to find it later though if there's a big party going on! :)

    Was this review helpful?

  • H-TownJourneyman's Profile Photo

    The Silversword of Haleakala

    by H-TownJourneyman Written Feb 22, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Silversword is a beautiful plant found only within the high elevations of Haleakala National Park on Maui. It can be recognized by the silver-colored hairs it has around it's base, and the large flowering stalk it produces at the end of it's life. They can grow as high as 6 ft. tall, and their life span ranges from 15 to 50 years. They only produce flowers once, after which they die. By the 1920's, silverswords were brought to near extinction due to introduced cattle and goats, as well as humans taking them for various ornamental purposes. But conservation efforts have increased their quantities greatly to this day.

    Was this review helpful?

Maui Hotels

See all 259 Hotels in Maui

Top Maui Hotels

Lahaina Hotels
201 Reviews - 671 Photos
Kihei Hotels
54 Reviews - 137 Photos
Hana Hotels
57 Reviews - 323 Photos
Kaanapali Hotels
14 Reviews - 44 Photos
Kapalua Hotels
16 Reviews - 23 Photos
Kahului Hotels
7 Reviews - 11 Photos
Paia Hotels
3 Reviews - 14 Photos
Wailuku Hotels
13 Reviews - 24 Photos
Makawao Hotels
5 Reviews - 3 Photos
Makena Hotels
4 Reviews - 17 Photos
Molokini Hotels
1 Review - 5 Photos
Haiku Hotels
6 Reviews - 7 Photos
Japanese Village One Hotels
See nearby hotels
Kaupo Hotels
1 Review - 4 Photos
Haleakala National Park Hotels
49 Reviews - 161 Photos

Instant Answers: Maui

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

62 travelers online now

Comments

Maui Local Customs

Reviews and photos of Maui local customs posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Maui sightseeing.
Map of Maui