Local traditions and culture in Maui

  • Island Traditions
    by cjg1
  • Island Traditions
    by cjg1
  • Island Traditions
    by cjg1

Most Viewed Local Customs in Maui

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    Take off your shoes before entering local homes

    by kalanialoha Updated Oct 7, 2006

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    In Hawaii, we always remove our shoes before entering anyone's home. This is a sign of respect. Don't worry, no one's going to take your shoes. It may be hard to find it later though if there's a big party going on! :)

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    The Silversword of Haleakala

    by H-TownJourneyman Written Feb 22, 2006

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    The Silversword is a beautiful plant found only within the high elevations of Haleakala National Park on Maui. It can be recognized by the silver-colored hairs it has around it's base, and the large flowering stalk it produces at the end of it's life. They can grow as high as 6 ft. tall, and their life span ranges from 15 to 50 years. They only produce flowers once, after which they die. By the 1920's, silverswords were brought to near extinction due to introduced cattle and goats, as well as humans taking them for various ornamental purposes. But conservation efforts have increased their quantities greatly to this day.

    The Silversword

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    the only words I learned

    by supune Written Dec 16, 2005

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    Mahalo - Thank You
    Aloha - (obviously the greeting we all know)
    Melakalikimaka - Merry Chrismas (thanks to Sandra
    A`ole pilikia - No problem
    kane - man
    ae - yes
    nai'a - dolphin
    imu - pit oven used at a luau

    Hula dancers
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    • Family Travel

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    Passion Fruit Blossom

    by seamandrew Written Oct 24, 2004

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    When we visited Lorraine's little shop up in Kahakuloa Village, we stepped into the backyard porch and decided to take in the lovely view there. To our surprise, Lorraine had Passion Fruit growing in her back yard. We didn't see any of the fruit just yet, though it does thrive in Maui, but we did see the beautiful blossom. Take the time to enjoy the botanical treasures Maui has to offer.

    The Passion Fruit Blossom
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    • Eco-Tourism

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    Resident Heron

    by seamandrew Written Oct 24, 2004

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    During our stay at the Renaissance Wailea, we had a small Heron that seem to have made the Mokapu wing his home. He was there 3 of the 5 days that we were there and made the experience all the more enjoyable. Heron's are quite common in Maui, but generally speaking, you have to travel into the marshes and other bodies of inland water to find them. It is not as common to find them on hotel grounds as we did.

    Little Heron at the Renaissance.
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    • Eco-Tourism
    • Birdwatching
    • Beaches

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    Hula Lessons for Children

    by AliasGirl Written Sep 24, 2004

    Four Seasons has a Children's program like a day camp for kids on vacation. One day they had hula lessons, from the pool we were watching and I was itching to get up and join along..

    If you can, its a nice local custom to pick up, learn the ways of the traditional hula dance.

    Hula Lessons

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    Erosion, Maui's greatest enemy

    by seamandrew Updated Sep 6, 2004

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    Maui's main enemy has to be erosion. Whether it be wind or sea, both are slowly taking Maui off the planet. Someday, Maui will cease to exist. Fortunately, it will be thousands of years from now. The sea constantly chips away at the shore lines creating beautiful and unimaginable shapes. Wind and rain have eroded sites like Haleakala and much of the National Park leaving behind the crater and valleys you see today. The big misnomer is that volcanic activity is the big cause. This is very wrong. It's the sea, wind, and rain. No where is this more evident than on the neighboring island of Kaho'olawe, and island no longer accessible to people. Enjoy the beautiful island paradise of Maui while it's there!

    Great shot of erosion on hills, not the best pic!
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    Plumeria, another tropical beauty.

    by seamandrew Written Sep 6, 2004

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    Funny enough, I knew this flower as the Frangipani, but I learned on this last trip to Maui that Frangipani is actually a species in the genus Plumeria. So Plumeria frangipani is the flower I've long adored and anyone who's been to my apartment would know why. For those of you who don't know, I have a poster on my wall of a beautiful woman's torso with this flower attached to the sarong around her waist. It's a lovely picture and an even lovelier flower.

    Having visited in the summer this time, the Plumeria was in bloom everywhere. Last time, we visited in February and I never a saw a single one (but we saw whales that time). Keep your eyes peeled for them as well as most resorts have them planted (they're small trees actually). Some private homes have them too. You can by them at the airport to give it a go at home. I bought 6. 2 for me, and the rest for others.

    Plumeria, a most beautiful flower.
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    Bird's of Paradise in Maui

    by seamandrew Written Sep 6, 2004

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    This very famous flower has become a mainstay of the flower industry. Most mixed bouquets will include this beautiful flower and fortunately, a visit to Maui will undoubtably include a few of these lovely flowers. Most resorts have them planted, but you do see the random ones growing in people's yards. At the airport, you can by some seeds to try and plant this flower for yourself. Good luck, I'm sure it's not an easy flower to grow.

    Birds of Paradise, Maui.
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    • Eco-Tourism

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    "The Aloha Spirit"

    by Erin74 Written Mar 24, 2004

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    When you arrive on Maui, you'll hear references to things like "aloha spirit" and "island time." What this means is that you've arrived in a place with its own unique pace and lifestyle. People on Maui are kind, polite and not in a hurry. Slow down, take a deep breath and you'll soon be on your way to encountering the Aloha Spirit.

    You will want to drive more slowly on Maui than you would at home. This is partially for safety reasons and partially just to respect the slower pace of island life. You will actually see signs along the roadside reminding you that this is not the Mainland and to slow down.

    Smile and wave to those you pass. Don't be impatient. Maui is a special place!

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Beaches
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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    Try a "lava flow" (cocktail)

    by Erin74 Written Oct 15, 2003

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    You just can't go to Hawaii and not try a lava flow. It is an amazing frozen cocktail that is sort of half pina colada, half strawberry margarita. It is made with rum, strawberries, bananas, pineapple and coconut-- and it is delicious! They serve this just about everywhere on Maui. Enjoy!

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    Farming in Maui

    by seamandrew Written May 27, 2003

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    Farming once once a mainstay in Maui. Pineapple, Sugar, exotic fruits, and even livestock. Today much of that has diminished dramatically. The great pineapple plantations of the past are reduced to a mere few. Don't get me wrong, many farms still exist but the tourism has taken on a much more important role in recent years.

    Not the best picture but it gets the point across!
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    Banyan Trees

    by seamandrew Updated May 26, 2003

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    Some of the oldest trees in the world, definitely the largest I've ever seen (not tallest, largest), the banyan trees in Maui are immensely beautiful. Their roots span out in aerial patterns that until seen with one's own eyes, can only exist in one's imagination. This one pictured here was along the Pipiwai Trail up to Waimoku falls. It's a great marker along the trail. Especially on the way down. Banyan trees are without a doubt, the most ancient looking trees one will ever see.

    Wise-looking Banyan Tree.
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    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park
    • Adventure Travel

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    Maui's unique botanical treasures

    by seamandrew Written May 26, 2003

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    The isolation of the Hawaiian islands, Maui included, has bestowed it with a wide variety of unique foliage. Add to this Maui's excellent climate and it's no wonder why this tiny volcanic island is full of lush vegetation. It seems that the color of all flowers in Maui are just a bit brighter than any where else I've been. A true splendor of nature.

    Maui's botanical treasures
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    • Eco-Tourism

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    Lu'aus

    by seamandrew Written May 26, 2003

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    Who doesn't know what a Lu'au is? We've all seen them somewhere, whether it be TV or a movie. We've all seen the fire-knife dancer risk life and limb while doing his juggling or the beautiful dancers bending their bodies to the sound of local music. The Lu'aus are highly recommended and you'll usually get all you can eat and drink for a price (between 50-80 dollars per person). Be sure to reserve your spot in advance. I have to admit we didn't partake in this fancy show because we saw it 5 nights in a row from our hotel room. The best picture I have is from the very beginning while it was still day light out.

    Lu'au at the Marriott
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    • Festivals
    • Family Travel

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