Unique Places in Maui

  • Jackson's Chameleon
    Jackson's Chameleon
    by briantravelman
  • Tiki Garden
    Tiki Garden
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  • Hawaii's State Bird, The Nene
    Hawaii's State Bird, The Nene
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Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Maui

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    The happiest day of my life!

    by BLewJay Updated Dec 17, 2013

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    Marrying Barry on the beach at Makena Cove was the most wonderful day I have experienced!

    We exchanged vows in the late afternoon, enjoyed the spectacular sunset, and then went for a wonderful dinner. We were Maui'd!

    Here below are some of Barry's Maui tips:

    I was reading the San Diego Union Tribune on June 1st, 2003 when they just happen to be running an article on Maui in the travel section. The article provided great tips on how to enjoy Maui from the viewpoint of the kama'aina (islanders)...here are some of the highlights of the article:

    1. A Bed & Breakfast with a view: If you are looking for a place to stay, then the The Old Wailuku Inn at Ulupono (www.oldwailukuinn.com) is the place to go.

    2. Beaches everywhere: Locals recommend Honolua Bay, Mushroom Reef in Kahana, Honokohau Bay, Waihee Beach and Kamaole III.

    3. Dining opportunities galore: the Komoda Store & Bakery (808) 572-7261, A Saigon Cafe (808) 243-9560, Chez Paul (808) 661-3843, Cafe 808 (808) 878-6874, Sam Sato (808) 244-7124, the Friday buffet at the Ka'anapali Beach Hotel (808) 661-0011, Da Kitchen (808) 871-7782 and the Manana Garage (808) 873-0220.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Beaches

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    Polipoli Spring State Recreation Area

    by JulieJueletha Updated Dec 10, 2013

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    Polipoli Spring State Recreation Area is located 9.7 miles upland from Kula on Waipoli Road off Kekaulike Avenue (Highway 377); 4-wheel drive vehicle recommended. Bring drinking water.

    Polipoli Spring State Recreation Area has a single cabin for rent at a high elevation on the slopes of Haleakala Volcano. This cabin has a kitchen-living room combination with a fireplace, a bathroom with hot shower, and furnished bedroom that accommodates up to 8 people. Dishes are provided but there is no electricity so there is no refrigerator and linens and towels are not provided. It is recommended to bring your own eating and cooking utensils. Non-residents: $90 per cabin per night, Hawaii residents $60. Bring warm clothes and bedding. You will need firewood for the fireplace and something to start the fire with.

    Camping is also available with permit. The campgrounds are within the fog belt of the Kula Forest Reserve at 6200 foot elevation. Extensive trail system in the forest reserve, including through a forest similar to the pine forests of the Pacific Northwest coast. On clear days the views of Central and West Maui, Kaho'olawe, Moloka'i and Lana'i are amazing. Pig and seasonal bird hunting here so hikers should wear bright colored clothing as hunters may be in the area. Nights are generally cold; winter nights frequently have below freezing temperatures. There are no campground showers.

    Hawaii Residents: $12 per campsite per night for up to 6 persons; $2 per night for each additional person (chlidren 2 and under free). Maximum fee per site: $20/night.

    Non-residents: $18 per campsite per night for up to 6 persons; $3 per night for each additional person (chlidren 2 and under free). Maximum fee per site: $30/night.

    Must have a tent or authorized camper van.
    Only authorized service animals are allowed in this park.
    COPY OF LODGING AND/OR CAMPING PERMITS ARE REQUIRED.

    https://camping.ehawaii.gov/camping/all,details,1684.html

    Related to:
    • Camping

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    Camp Maui's State Parks

    by JulieJueletha Written Dec 10, 2013

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    Both of the Maui Parks, Polipoli Spring State Recreation Area and Wai’anapanapa State Park offer tent camping in addition to cabin lodging. Wai'anapanapa State Park is also the only State Park in Hawaii that has a small area designated for camper vans.

    Hawaii Residents: $12 per campsite per night for up to 6 persons; $2 per night for each additional person (chlidren 2 and under free). Maximum fee per site: $20/night.

    Non-residents: $18 per campsite per night for up to 6 persons; $3 per night for each additional person (chlidren 2 and under free). Maximum fee per site: $30/night.

    Wai'anapanapa State Park
    Hana, HI 96713
    (808) 984-8109

    Polipoli Spring State Recreation Area
    Waipoli Road, Kula, HI
    (808) 984-8109

    You must have a camping permit! Get the permit and pin it to your tent, they check!

    https://camping.ehawaii.gov/camping/all,details,1684.html

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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Photography
    • Camping

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    Cabins on Shoreline Wai‘anapanapa State Park

    by JulieJueletha Updated Dec 9, 2013

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    A great low-cost way to stay in Hana, Maui is at the Wai‘anapanapa State Park. It has fantastic views of the ocean,a rugged coastline and is in the middle of natural, undeveloped Maui. Here you can live for 5 days in a spacious cabin, go camping, picnicking, do shore fishing and hardy family hiking along an ancient Hawaiian coastal trail which leads to Hana.

    You can see a seabird colony and anchialine pools (see my Maui page on anchialine pools here), a native hala forest, a religious temple, stone arch, an ancient cave, sea stacks, blow hole and a small black sand beach.

    Located in Hana at the end of Wai‘anapanapa Road off Hana Highway (Highway 360), 52.8 miles (3 hour drive) east of Kahului Airport. The maximum length of stay is 5 consecutive nights.

    The housekeeping cabins accommodate up to 6 persons, has a large living area, bedroom and kitchen furniture, dishes, an electric stovetop, microwave and refrigerator and a bathroom with hot shower. Linens and towels are not provided and it is recommended that you bring your own eating and cooking utensils.

    Cost is approximately $90 per cabin per night ($60 for Hawaii residents). Prices change so be sure to check.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Photography
    • Family Travel

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    Maui Anchialine pools

    by JulieJueletha Written Dec 9, 2013

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    In Oahu I had seen an anchialine pool and had a great time with a group of students exploring them (see Oahu Anchialine Pools). But while in Maui going to a lovely swimming spot beneath "our" waterfall, our host showed us where one of these pools was.

    I will repeat that most of these landlocked salt water pools are on the big island of Hawaii but there are some on Maui, Oahu, Molokai and Kaho'olawe. The term "anchialine" is derived from the greek [anchi] = near, and [halos] = the sea, referring to the proximity of anchialine pools to the ocean. These pools have underground connections to the sea, and show tidal fluctuations in their water level.

    I had seen a young starfish in a pool on Oahu but here in Maui I saw only bits of shell and sand. A student of sealife might have been able to spot more. These pools and the blow holes carved by the oceans waters and waves fascinated me much as rock formations fascinate me, having been carved by rivers or wind.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Photography
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Green Sea Turtles below Ho'okipa Lookout

    by Roadquill Written Dec 6, 2012

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    A few miles or so East of Paia is the Ho'okipa Lookout where you can watch large waves hit the shore. If the waves are right there will be some great surfing. However, a few years ago someone noticed that green sea turtles were coming ashore at night during certain times of the year, presumably to be able to rest away from pesky sharks. We arrived at dusk and they were starting to come ashore. Probably ten were inching their way up the sand. There were representatives from a conservancy program that were explaining the actions and reminding us no to use flash photography.

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    • Beaches

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    Dophin watching at La Perouse Bay

    by Roadquill Written Dec 6, 2012

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    The dolphins hang about 150 yards offshore, and mill around doing their dophin thing. These are spinner dolphins and only about a yard long. They communicate with one another by slapping in the water on their reentry. They seem very tolerant of the swimmers that swim out to them as well as the tourist boats that visit. We visited in the early morning before the wind comes up... We were told they are there only in the morning.

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    • Beaches

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    Drop Dead Gorgeous View-Honolua Bay

    by Roadquill Written Dec 5, 2012

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    Just North of Kapalua, half a mile past mile marker 32 is a parking area on the ocean side. This parking area overlooks the drop dead, gorgeous Honolua Bay a hundred or so yards below nestled against the cliffs on one side and the green, luscious forest at the entrance to the bay.

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    • Beaches

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    Hike to the Nakalele Blowhole

    by Roadquill Written Dec 3, 2012

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    The volcanic sculptures along the sort of trail from Highway 30, mile marker 38 to the Nakalele Blowhole are spectacular making the mile or so hike a pleasure. Plus you have amazing views of the waves breaking against the NW Maui coastline. It is a slightly easier hike if you start at mile marker 40, but you miss the rock formations.

    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Photography
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Best Maui Snorkeling

    by totaltranquility Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    If you want to get your snorkeling fix in Maui you are definitely going to the right place. The best snorkeling ever is at "the fish pond". It is a 30 min hike over rough lava, therefore it is not crowded. It is extremely hard to find but well worth it. Wear appropriate shoes for the hike. Tevas are okay. Flip-flops would be disasterous. And don't carry too much stuff. It is a moderate hike.

    Drive south on Highway 31, turn right on Wailea Iki Drive toward The Shops at Wailea. Note your mileage at this point. Park at the parking lot on the right at Ahihi Bay. Continue down the road past telephone pole #17, and then past telephone pole #18 (not marked). About 20 yards past this pole the path begins. It is not very obvious, very easy to miss. There are (were) a few small splashes of white paint on the water pipe along the edge of the trail. If you look closely you will see the trail. Once you are on the trail, the rest is obvious. Just walk toward the water. The fish pond is amazing. Don't miss it.

    Related to:
    • Diving and Snorkeling

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    The Road to Hana

    by PeterVancouver Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The road to Hana takes you through the USA's largest rain forest. It is 52 miles of twisting and turning road with over 50 bridges and 600 sharp bends so dont imagine you can do it in much less than two to three hours each way. Once you get to Hana, which in itself is really made up of Hasegawa's store and very little else, you will have to come back the same way as you went. For those who are interested, Charles Lindburg is buried just outside of Hana.

    When driving, make sure you have plenty of gas as you can go at least 50 miles without a sign of a gas station although there is one in Hana. also ensure you pull over for faster cars as they are generally locals who want to get home and dont take kindly to travelling at 20mph behind a tourist. There are a number of places of interest on the route so ensure you have an early start as driving back in the dark is somewhat stressful. There are numerous stalls offering fantastic flowers and fruit on the roadside which are worth a stop.

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    Go to Moloka'i

    by heitzenrater Written Jan 1, 2011

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    Having been to the Islands a few times you may find your self wanting to venture to some of the less traveled islands. I chose to go on a day trip to Moloka'i. The Molokai-Maui Ferry is the way to go. It takes about 1:30 to make it across, but on the way we witnessed many marine creatures. Whale, Dolphin, Flying fish, and Sea turtles where on the ferry rout. These are by no means a guaranty but I would be amazed if you went in the winter and did not see a whale, or 10. Once on the island it is more of a scenic place. Very "old" hawaii, meaning there are no real touristy areas. No franchisees. Just a scenic island that once you go to you can check off your list. I went with the ferry/ car rental package. I would not recommend going if you don't rent the car. You will not be able to see any of the island, and will just be stuck on a pier that has no beach near it.

    COST: One way about 55 after tax.
    Round trip ticket and rental car 210. If you have additional people in your group then the ferry ride for them is only 90 round trip.

    Maui Departure from Lahaina Harbor, Pier #3
    Mon-Sat 7:15 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.

    Kaunakakai, Molokai to Lahaina, Maui
    Departure Mon-Sat 5:15 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.

    It was worth going to but now that I have been to that island I would not go back as in one day I feel as if I did it all there.

    IF YOU LIKE MY POST PLEASE GIVE POSITIVE FEEDBACK. THANKS

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    Taking the back road to Hana via Kaupo

    by WestMaui Updated Aug 11, 2009

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    Aloha - If you've been on the traditional Road to Hana, you may want to try the "back way" next time - it's faster to take the southeast roads but they're rougher. From Kihei, take Mokulele Hwy. to Kahului, turn right on Dairy Rd. then turn rt. on Hana Hwy. and another rt. on Haleakala Hwy. up the mountain. Take Kula Hwy. Route 37 south to Keokea. This two-lane road winds around Ulupalakua, past Tedeschi Vineyard Tasting Room & Ulupalakua Ranch store (a nice stop) through dry terrain punctuated by interesting native plants and lots of lava rock. The road is open and driveable but it gets very dusty (or muddy after rains). Between Kaupo and Kipahulu is the roughest part, yes, kind of like a washboard. Views are really cool, though. Take plenty of water. First rest-stop these days is in Kipahulu at the organic coffee farm place. Then you'll come to Pools of 'Ohe'o and the Kipahulu Visitor Center for Haleakala National Park before heading into Hana.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Adventure Travel
    • National/State Park

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    The Red Sand Beach in Hana Town

    by AKtravelers Written Apr 3, 2009

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    Lots of people drive the road to Hana, but few stop in Hana Town to make the tricky trek to the red sand beach. We stopped there for lunch, managing to down our sandwiches before a cold north rain drove us off the sand. It trulyis red, though it has some black grains mixed in to add a little peppery flavor. We shared the beach with only a few other people, including an old hippy like guy who looked like he had been sitting in the same place since 1969 -- maybe his buzz was just wearing off!

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    • Beaches

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    FOUND ONLY AT THE TOP OF HALEAKALA

    by travelgourmet Updated Mar 16, 2009

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    The silversword plant grows only in the cinders of Haleakala crater. The leaf of a silversword is covered with a dense layer of silvery silky hairs that reflect light and heat and provide insulation against the intense solar radiation and extreme ardity of the 10,000 foot high crater.

    It resembles the Yucca plant of Southern California, but is actually a relative of the tarweed or sunflower of California, and most likely arrived by seed over a million years ago. In full bloom, it is one of natures most beautiful sights. After the bloom, which takes the plant anywhere from 4 to 20 years before blooming, the plant dies, its work done. If you go to the crater, I hope a silversword is in full bloom for you.

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    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Family Travel

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Maui Hotels

See all 259 Hotels in Maui

Top Maui Hotels

Lahaina Hotels
201 Reviews - 671 Photos
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Maui Off The Beaten Path

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