Fun things to do in Molokai

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Molokai

  • BlueCollar's Profile Photo

    Visit a Coconut Grove Fit for a King

    by BlueCollar Updated May 14, 2008

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    The Kapuâiwa Coconut Grove is just that - a coconut grove. It sits near Kaunakakai and was originally planted in the 1860's by Kamehameha V.

    Take a stroll through, if you're brave. But consider yourself warned because these trees have NOT been sanitized of their fruit like so many others throughout these islands. The ocassional thud you will hear reminds you of the force with which they may impact your skull. Be careful enough that the thud you hear is NOT from a coconut striking your head. :() It gives the adage "keep looking up" a whole new importance.

    The morning we were here was one of the few days on this trip where we had blue sky. It was a very welcomed change.

    Do you know how many varieties of coconut there are? How many can you find at this park? Do you know the original size (acreage) of the grove?

    Related to:
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    • Arts and Culture
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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    Visit Papohaku Beach Park

    by BlueCollar Written Oct 20, 2007

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    This park is on the northwestern side of the island. Yes, this is the arid side and the vegetation does not appear all that tropical because of it.

    It's just your typical beach park. Down towards the beach you'll find one hidden and unpleasant feature. Little twiggs hidden in the deep sand that have fallen from some of the smaller trees. Your bare feet will certainly feel the thorns on those twiggs. Be sure to wear some slippers.

    The water is a little rough. It may be too rough for the little ones.

    As you can see from my photos, it was cloudy. We had plenty of rain during this whole trip. :(

    Main entrance Vandals have painted a political message Soft, rusty colored sand. It may be too rough for the tykes. Just one of many wild turkey we saw.
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    Visit a Museum

    by BlueCollar Updated Oct 20, 2007

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    The Moloka‘i Museum is located in the upper reaches of the island at the old Meyer Sugar Mill. This museum is mostly dedicated to the sugarcane industry and, more appropriately, the work of R. W. Meyer's family from the late 1800's onward.

    The building that houses the majority of the historic equipment was the original building used by the Meyer's for production. The restoration of it was an interesting story in that the building had been overgrown and impaled by trees. The original structure was so weakened from rot and weathering that the only thing holding it up were the trees growing inside of it. Therefore, before they could remove the trees, the structure had to be reinforced. It caused a long and labored process.

    Another interesting item was that some of the mill equipment pieces had to be custom molded and machined because no others remained in the market.

    Because they used as much of the original wood from the structure as possible, you can read much of the graffiti scribed by people many decades ago as they secretly entered the then-abandoned building. Remembering what I do of my youth, I have a good idea of why these messages of love were scribed here.

    I found the whole place interesting. My wife did not find it as intriguing.

    Be sure to check out their outhouse!

    The historic building Steam engine with boiler in background Centrifugals used to separate cane juice Evaporators used to reduce cane juice Much that wood is original
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    • Museum Visits

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    Drive to Halawa (East End)

    by RickinDutch Updated Mar 3, 2006

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    The 25 mile drive from Kaunakaki to the end of the road is very scenic and well worth it. The road can get pretty narrow and twisty in spots, but traffic is light and the slow speed limit take the pressure off. Kaunakaki is right on the dividing line between the wet and dry ends, so as you head east the land becomes more and more lush.

    Along the way are numerous ancient fish ponds that belonged to the kings and several temples back in among the trees. There is also a beautiful little church. There is only one small grocery store at about mile 18.

    Halawa has a great beach for walking where the river meets the sea. With the northern exposure the surf can get quite high and rough and I would not recommend swimming unless you are used to such conditions.

    The Halawa Valley has a hiking trail back thru some ancient sites and ends at a great waterfall. But much of the trail is over private property. We haven't been in a few years, so I'm not sure where the private property access issue is. It seems to be on again / off again. Check at the shack at the end of the road before you start walking. Might be worthwhile hiring a local guide to get the full flavor of this very important ancient site.

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    Kalaupapa Lookout and Phallic Rock

    by RickinDutch Written Jan 30, 2006

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    At the end of the road north of Kaunaukakai, is the Kalaupapa Lookout and the Kaule o NanaHoe (phallic rock). The parking lot leads to both, just follow the signs. North of the parking lot is the short (100 yards) trail to the lookout. The view is fantastic, standing at the top of the highest seacliffs in Hawaii, looking down at the former leper's colony, Kalaupapa.

    A little longer hike, (1/2 mile) thru thick bamboo, is the phallic rock. It is said that women who touch it are much more likely to conceive.

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    Golfing

    by RickinDutch Updated Jan 30, 2006

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    There are two golf courses on Molokai.
    Kaluakoi Resort on the west end has a stunning 18 hole designed by someone famous (Robinson?) that just reopened. Green fees run $70 for 18 holes or $35 for nine, including cart. Club rental is $15 and a pro is available on site. The front nine is level and along the water with great vistas. Back nine goes up the hill and back down with some rugged terrain along the way. Hole #3 is often mentioned as one of the toughest in Hawaii. Watch the trades.

    The other course is the little known 9 hole municipal course up in Kualapuu on Hwy 470, Ironwood Hills. My wife and I and three of our kids rented a cart, a bag of clubs and a 5 gallon bucket of balls for $20 and had a ball learning to play here. We finally had to call the game on the 5th hole due to lack of light. The rough is indeed the rough and it is best to forget about the ball if it leaves the fairway. If you're new to golf and want a great place to hack away - this is your spot.

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    Mule Ride to Kalaupapa

    by RickinDutch Updated Jan 30, 2006

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    An exciting ride not for the feint of heart! Starting at the top of the world's highest sea cliffs, seasoned guides lead you down a steep and at times very narrow trail to Kalaupapa National Historical Park. Kalaupapa is the site of the leper colony where Father Damian worked for many years. While there are no longer any active cases of leprosy in the Hawaiian Islands, there are still some residents in the colony that once had the desease. The community will remain open as long as these former patients wish to remain there. It is Kapu to take their pictures without permission.

    The story of this colony is a fascinating glimpse into man's inhumanity. Anyone in the islands suspected of being infected was rounded up and dropped off just offshore with the clothes on their back and nothing else. For years the colony was a lawless place. Robert Lewis Stevenson wrote a fascinating log of his trip here.

    Once your mule gets you to the bottom of the cliffs, you are met by a small bus that will take you around the former colony. Your guide will be a resident and former patient of the colony who has chosen to stay. This is an all day trip, so bring munchies and water along.

    A fascinating journey!

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    Longest beach in Hawai'i

    by RickinDutch Written Jan 17, 2006

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    Papohaku Beach is the longest white sand beach in Hawai'i. What always amazes me is that many times I'm the only person on the entire 3 mile stretch.
    A great place for jogging or a quiet stroll. Swimming is usually safe in the summer, but strong winter swells create dangerous and dramatic surf conditions.
    Best time to visit the beach is early in the day before the trades pick up. I think it is the blowing sand that keeps the crowds away - that, plus it's Molokai!

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    Molokai to Oaha Paddleboard Race

    by HawaiianKukiniNui Written Jan 9, 2006

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    Some 70 participants from an international field journey to Molokai to compete in this 32-mile race, considered to be the world championship of long-distance paddleboard racing. The race begins at Kaluakoi Beach on Molokai at 7am and finishes at Maunaloa Bay, Oahu around 12:30pm. Call tel. 808/638-8208. Mid- to late July.

    Kukini Nui in boat accompaning a paddleboarder Paddleboarder Paddleboarder Molokai Postcard Slow Down This Is Molokai
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  • cherylll's Profile Photo

    macadamian nut farm

    by cherylll Written Jan 7, 2006

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    You can visit Perdy's Macadamian nut farm and have a tour from how they are grown on the tree to how they are harvested, dried, methods of roasting, how to cook with them,etc.Definitly buy some of the nut oil; different flavours and it is very healthy.

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    Hanging in Oahu

    by kimvilla Updated Apr 5, 2005

    In addition to being the home to Honolulu, the biggest city in Hawaii, the island of Oahu offers its vistors 100+ miles of white sand beaches, transparent ocean waters, extreme waves for surfing, historical monuments, museums and tropical gardens and rainforests.

    Picture: The lifeguard tower on the left overlooks a small island called Chinamans Hat from a beach in southwest Oahu.

    Here's a quick list of things to do and places to visit is Oahu...

    Waikiki Beach: A great spot to pop open a Corona and chill out in the daytime...and the go clubbing at night. This beach is right in the middle of all the action with sweet restaurants, bars, clubs and shopping in its midst.

    North Shore: If you've ever surfed then you've probably heard of this spot which produces some of the largest and most majestic waves in the world. Surf contests are hosted here on a regular basis by surfers competing for the ultimate glory.

    Pearl Harbor: The USS Arizona Memorial commemorates the 1,102 crewmen who perished when their ship was attacked on December 7, 1941. All told, 2,390 lives were lost in the early morning raid by the Japanese military which led to a war declaration the next day by US President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

    Polynesian Cultural Center: This nonprofit center is located in the predominately Mormon town of Laie in the North corner of the Windward Coast in
    Hawaii.

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    Kalaupapa Peninsula

    by AndreSTGT Updated May 29, 2004

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    This peninsula is one of the most remarkable and unusual travel destinations in the world and the highlight of any visit to Molokai.
    It is a working leper colony and can only be visited by plane or by descending a narrow spectacular trail from the top of a cliff.
    I went down on a mule. Our group was met by a guide (one of the lepers) who showed us around. Then we had a picnic at one of the most beautiful places on earth (and this is no exaggeration) at the eastern end of the peninsula.
    The mule tour costs 140$ and can be booked through one of the hotels or at the stables near the Kalaupapa view point.

    Kalaupapa
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    Kalaupapa National Historic Park

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Mar 11, 2004

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    One of the more difficult National Park sites to reach in the U.S., Kalaupapa may be visited only by persons 16 and older, and then only by invitation. The best way to secure an invitation is through Damien Tours. (See our activity tip under Kalaupapa Mule Ride).

    Once we arrived at the park on muleback, we were greeted by a congenial fellow in a dilapadated old school bus. He informed us that he was a mechanic, but today had been designated to be our tour guide. He did a great job. It was heart-rending to see the now mostly empty buildings and hear the tales of isolation and desperation experienced by the hundreds of victims of Hansen's disease who lived and died here. This is the source of Molokai's nickname, "The Forbidden Isle."

    The natural history of the site is also extremely interesting. We viewed ruins which dated back to the times of the first Polynesian settlers to these islands, hundreds of years ago. The tour included a box lunch which we enjoyed overlooking what is certainly one of the most dramatic coastlines in the world.

    Our Tour Bus at Kalaupapa National Historic Site
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    • National/State Park

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    Kalaupapa Lookout

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Mar 11, 2004

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    This dramatic point in the Palaau State Park offers a spectacular view of the Kalaupapa Peninsula. A "leper" colony, this idyllic peninsula is seperated from the rest of the island by dramatic sea cliffs which soar half a mile above the Pacific.

    The term "leporsy" is no longer politically correct, having been replaced by the term "Hansen's Disease." This contagious malady swept through the Hawaiian islands in the mid-19th century and hundreds of victims were exiled to this remote spot. Hansens Disease can now be controlled by modern drugs, so few patients remain.

    Father Damien, a Catholic priest, came to Kalaupapa from Belgium in 1873. He literally gave his life in service to the patients, succumbing to the same disease 16 years later. Today Father Damien is highly revered as the unofficial patron saint of the islands.

    The Kalaupapa Peninsula from the Sea Cliffs
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  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    Kalaupapa Mule Ride

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Mar 8, 2004

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    No roads lead to Kalaupapa. In fact, this remote pennisula is a County to itself, Kalawao," totally seperate from Maui County, of which the rest of Molokai is a part. There is a small airport, and twice a year a supply barge lands at the dock, but the more adventurous way to visit this remote outpost is to walk or take a mule down the Kalaupapa Trail.

    Not for the faint of heart, some parts of this trail were a bit frightening to me since I tend to have a fear of heights. These are the highest sea cliffs in the world. A half inch of wet rock and the sure-footedness of my dumb beast of burden were the only things between me and oblivion. I asked our guide if he had ever lost a mule and he replied, "Only one." Fortunately that mule was a "trainee," and not carrying a passenger at the time. Small comfort!

    Karen is an experienced horsewoman and not afraid of heights. She said she wasn't scared at all. Of the many things we saw and did in the islands, this is the memory we talk of most.

    One of 26 Switchbacks on the Kalapapa Trail
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