Fun things to do in Molokai

  • Things to Do
    by Assenczo
  • Things to Do
    by Assenczo
  • Things to Do
    by Assenczo

Most Viewed Things to Do in Molokai

  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    Pala'au State Park

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Mar 5, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In the high country on the north end of Molokai we reveled in the cool misty pines that comprise Pala'au State Park. There are picnic tables, petroglyphs, and winding trails atop 3,000 foot sea cliffs.

    One trail was a pleasant walk to Phallic Rock. According to traditional Hawaiian religion, any young maiden who has trouble conceiving a child will become pregnant if she brings a gift and spends the night at the base of this unusual formation. Karen posed for a picture but didn't dare leave an offering. A necklace beside the rock let us know that an earlier visitor had done just that.

    Phallic Rock
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • Halawa Valley is sacred for a reason

    by counsel1956 Written Dec 31, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is one of the most beautiful places on the planet. One of the Jurassic Park movies opened with helicopter shots flying up the valley. Two high waterfalls at the inland end, lush vegetation down to the black sand beach at Halawa Bay. Excellent surfing, calmest in August when it's double overhead. Six residents there now but previously uninhabited since everyone died the night of April 1, 1946 in a tsunami. Oldest human habitation in the Hawaiian Islands, dating to the seventh century. It was at its most crowded when we were there, thirty people max, all locals except us. If you go to Moloka'i DON"T miss Halawa (pronounced "HALAVA") Valley. Bring boogy boards and flippers.

    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest

    Was this review helpful?

  • dovalyn's Profile Photo

    Molokai Beaches

    by dovalyn Written Sep 12, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You will find many beaches on Molokai and some of them you will hardly see a soul. Beaches here are not like the sardine packed beaches of Oahu. Great views, nice white sandy beaches and your own footprints....priceless!

    view of maui from my uncle's place
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • AndreSTGT's Profile Photo

    West Coast

    by AndreSTGT Updated Jun 5, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The most beautiful beaches on the island can be found on the west coast.
    Even though the sparse vegetation in this part of the island does not fulfil the Hawaiian cliché of a tropical paradise, the beaches, esp. the 2.5 mile Papohaku beach are world class (white sand, blue sea) and usually deserted.

    West Coast Beach
    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • annk's Profile Photo

    Papohaku Beach

    by annk Updated Mar 22, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Located on the west side of the island, Papohaku Beach is considered to be the best in Molokai and 2nd largest. It spans 3 miles in length and 100 yards wide and is almost deserted. We saw at the most maybe 3 other people on this beach. Appeared to be a great place for relaxing or a barbecue, camping is available also.
    However, the currents looked threatening so I'm not sure how safe swimming would be.

    Papohaku Beach Park
    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • annk's Profile Photo

    Ili'ili'opae Heiau

    by annk Updated Mar 18, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Built in the 13th century this heiau is the 2nd largest and perhaps the oldest religious site in Hawaii. The temple was a school for sorcerers and was known for human sacrifice. It was constructed of stone passed hand by hand for 8 miles over mountains and a steep trail. No mortar was used.

    On the National Register of Historic Places.

    It is located on private land so you must call for permission to enter the site.
    (808) 558-8132.
    Ok, we didn't realize this and visited the site without permission or any problems when we got there, not that I'd recommend doing that. Perhaps nobody was home when we visited.
    Anyhow, the trail leading to the heiau is across the street from the Hawaiian Warrior sign shown on my "general" tips. Walk around the gate (it's locked) and it's about 10 minutes down the dirt road right past a small house and to the left in dense vegetation.

    Ili'ili'opae Heiau
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • annk's Profile Photo

    The Martyr of Molokai

    by annk Written Mar 16, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The statue of Father Damien is next to the church and often draped with leis.

    Father Damien was born in Belgium in 1840. In 1864 he was ordained a priest in Honolulu, then 9 years later he joined the leper colony on Molokia when many of his parishiners were being shipped there after becoming inflicted with leprosy. He dedicated 16 years of his life assisting the lepers and built 6 chapels, a home for boys then later one for girls, said mass every morning, administered medical service, built homes and even dug graves. In 1885 he contracted the disease but continued to work almost until his death in 1889.

    Father Damien
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • annk's Profile Photo

    Our Lady of Seven Sorrows

    by annk Written Mar 16, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The 2nd church built by Father Damien on Molokai, completed in 1874. The church is set amongst a beautiful background of mountains. Looking out towards the ocean another ancient fish pond can be seen.

    Our Lady of Seven Sorrows Church
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • annk's Profile Photo

    Ancient Hawaiian Fishponds

    by annk Written Mar 15, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    At one time there were as many as 60 ancient fish ponds along the shallow south coast of Molokai. Most date back to the 13th century and are semi-circular and composed of lava rock and coral. Fish would swim into the pond during high tide and as the tide subsided, the fish would be trapped.

    Currently there are 2 ponds designated as national historical landmarks including the Kakakaia Pond pictured. This pond has also been turned into a wetland bird sanctuary.

    Kakahaia Pond
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Beaches

    Was this review helpful?

  • annk's Profile Photo

    A walk through the Ironwoods

    by annk Written Mar 15, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It's about a 5 minute walk through a forest of soft-looking ironwood trees to get to the Kalaupapa lookout.

    Another site within walking distance of the same parking area is the 6 foot Phallic Rock or "*** of Nanahoa". Through the ages women would bring offerings and spend the night in the hopes of conceiving a child. I'm sorry I missed this and don't have a photo to share.

    on the way to Kalaupapa lookout
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • annk's Profile Photo

    Kalaupapa National Historical Park

    by annk Written Mar 15, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If visiting Molokai for a day only, it's not possible to see both the leper colony at Kalaupapa and drive the island. Torn between what to do we chose the later but hope to return someday to visit the colony.

    The National Park & settlement are located on a peninsula at the center of the island on the north shore. The peninsula is separated by a 1660 foot bluff which isolates it from the rest of the island. Because of this isolation, people afflicted with leprosy were banished here beginning 1866 all the way up to 1969. Back in the 1860's leprosy was spreading throughout the islands so this was an attempt to contain the disease. In 1873 Father Damien, a catholic priest from Belgium arrived in an attempt to assist the colony. He ended up living there until his death of the disease in 1889.

    Access to the peninsula is by plane, hiking or mule. Permission is required and visitors must be 16 years old.

    While driving the length of the island, we did stop at the Kalaupapa Lookout which afforded us with spectacular views of the peninsula and informational plaques describing the hardships of the lepers banished here.

    Kalaupapa lookout
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • AlohaDean's Profile Photo

    Mule Ride and Helicopter Tour

    by AlohaDean Written Feb 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Molokai has a very special and various scenery. You can find some of the world's highest sea cliffs rising majestically to meet the clouds on Molokai's North Coast (Pali Coast). The ocean has carved away the old volcano as high as 3000 feet. There are several uninhabited valleys, the largest being Pelekunu and Wailau, with waterfalls cascading from nearly 2,000 feet to the sea. This untouched wilderness, accessible only by helicopter, by boat, or by foot, is a hiker's paradise. The numerous trails lead to spectacular overlooks, historic sites and secluded forest pools. The Pali Coast was the background for some scenes from the famous Jurassic Park blockbuster.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism

    Was this review helpful?

  • ArenJo's Profile Photo

    Saint Joseph Church

    by ArenJo Written Jan 16, 2014

    Very beautiful little church in the countryside. Easy to find from the main road going through the countryside. The doors of the little countryside churches are always open to visit.

    Sign welcoming you Statue of Joseph Dutton Statue of St. Damien Inside the church The exterior of the church
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • ArenJo's Profile Photo

    Papohaku Beach Park

    by ArenJo Written Jan 16, 2014

    Nothing all that special here, but nice and secluded if you have extra time. I only saw two other people there the whole time I was there. The bathrooms were clean and the grass well maintained.

    The sign welcoming you in. The waves Very few other visitors to the beach A house in the distance The bathroom that looks like it has surfboards
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Beaches

    Was this review helpful?

  • AKtravelers's Profile Photo

    Enjoy Alone Time at Mo'omomi Sand Dunes

    by AKtravelers Written Jul 14, 2008

    Mo-omomi Sand Dunes are a vast stretch of Nature Conservency land along the windswept western north coast of Moloka'i.

    The sand dunes along the North Coast
    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

Molokai Hotels

See all 15 Hotels in Molokai

Top Molokai Hotels

Kalaupapa Hotels
6 Reviews
Kaunakakai Hotels
13 Reviews - 10 Photos
Wailua Hotels
1 Hotel

Instant Answers: Molokai

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

85 travelers online now

Comments

Molokai Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Molokai things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Molokai sightseeing.
Map of Molokai