Ahuimanu Travel Guide

  • Byodo-in
    Byodo-in
    by GuthrieColin
  • Japanese 10 Yen Coin
    Japanese 10 Yen Coin
    by GuthrieColin
  • Japanese Rock Garden
    Japanese Rock Garden
    by GuthrieColin

Ahuimanu Things to Do

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    by GuthrieColin Updated Mar 24, 2008

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    The Byodo-in of Ahuimanu is a full scale replica of one built in Japan. It is well known for its bracketing system and use of no nails. Byodo-in, meaning “temple of equality, not to discriminate” is a non-denominational Buddhist structure.
    The Building has been nicknamed the Phoenix hall (鳳凰堂 hōō-dō) for the presence of two figures of the legendary birds that adorn the main hall’s roof. Phoenix’s are seen as a good omen since the bird rose from the ashes symbolizing rebirth.
    The temple is located in the Valley of the Temples with the rugged Ko’olau Mountains in the background. Tranquil gardens and its secluded location provide a very relaxing atmosphere. Be sure to respect the site by removing your shoes before entering the temple and by quieting your cell phone ect. Help to create a pleasant environment for all of the visitors.

    Hours: 8:30am - 4:30pm daily

    Byodo-in From the Meditation Hall From Behind Byodo-in Byodo-in Entering Site
    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

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    by GuthrieColin Updated Mar 24, 2008

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    The Byodo-in in Ahuimanu is a full sized replica of one built in the year 998 C.E. in Uji near Kyoto Japan. The Original was built first as part of a rural Villa then converted to a temple 50 years later. Hawaii’s temple was built in 1968 to commemorate Japanese heritage on the island.
    In 1994 UNESCO listed the Kyoto Temple as a world heritage Site under the note, Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto. The building is so respected and revered that it has even been chosen to face the 10 yen coin.
    The two main differences between the buildings are the materials used, and the landscape. In the original building the construction was done entirely with timber members and no nails. The Hawaiian temple was built with concrete but replicates the intricate bracketing system from the original. The result is that the concrete was painted red to hide its materiality; however, the paint has made the building more dramatic.
    Many pictures of the Byodo-in temples are of the one in Hawaii since it is more accessible and happens to have a more dramatic backdrop. The rugged Ko’olau mountain range as a backdrop is more appealing than the non-mountainous backdrop in Kyoto.

    Hours: 8:30am - 4:30pm daily

    Dramatic Backdrop Japanese 10 Yen Coin Building Detail Concrete Bracket Detail
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    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

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    by GuthrieColin Updated Mar 23, 2008

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    This rock garden is not meant to walk in. It is meant to be viewed and respected so don’t try and walk there. The rocks are meant to symbolize the sea and are raked to suggest rippling water. The statues, rocks, or plants in the garden are meant as focal points and can symbolize islands in the sea or simply ideas to contemplate.
    The main goal of a Japanese Rock Garden is to provide a view for personal reflection. In the Byodo-in I believe it is for it is used to strengthen the tranquility of the site which also includes some traditional landscaping and also a meditation house.

    Hours: 8:30am - 4:30pm daily

    Japanese Rock Garden Garden Relation to Building Statue in Garden
    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

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