Related Oahu Favorites Tips

  • Paradise Cove Luau
    Paradise Cove Luau
    by littlesam1
  • Paradise Cove Luau
    Paradise Cove Luau
    by littlesam1
  • Larry at Paradise Cove
    Larry at Paradise Cove
    by littlesam1

Most Viewed Favorites in Oahu

  • Nathalie_B's Profile Photo

    "Hikers' guide to Oahu"

    by Nathalie_B Updated Nov 2, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: This is the book we used for our hiking trails. It is amazing how detailed the information is. Every trail is accurately described telling you by what tree to turn left, by what rock to climb up and how to cross a stream by two mango trees. Besides giving the general directions and explanations the book explains every trail’s history, uniqueness, flora, and fauna. While hiking you’ll learn what trees where used by the locals and by what purposes, if birds are typical to this area or they simply visit the place on their way elsewhere. You’ll know what wild fruits are safe to eat and what should be avoided. And for sure you won’t get lost if carefully following directions. Some trails are very isolated and not listed in general books and brochures available for tourists.
    Only once we missed our turn point, but this is because some ass took the mark off, so we didn’t blame the author.

    Hikers Guide
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • Nathalie_B's Profile Photo

    Beaches of Oahu

    by Nathalie_B Written Nov 2, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Since the state law prohibits private beaches, the whole island is yours to enjoy, just choose your piece of sandy shoreline and enjoy the sun. There are many types of activities in the water so some beaches are suitable for surfing, some for snorkeling or diving, some for kite surfing, and some are for spoiled people like Nathalie_B who doesn’t like to step on stones when in the water and looks for silky-sandy bottom.
    And, of course, beaches are the best place for sunset or sunrise watching depends on what side of the island you are. In other words…. Paradise!

    Somewhere on the north shore
    Related to:
    • Beaches

    Was this review helpful?

  • AKtravelers's Profile Photo

    Be Alert for Rainbows

    by AKtravelers Updated Aug 11, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: It's no accident that Hawaii puts rainbows on its license plates -- there are rainbows everywhere. The nature of the Hawaiian weather means that sun is often shining through rain and midst, creating hued arches almost everywhere. I once saw a complete double-arched rainbow commuting east-bound on route 78. More often, however, you'll see peices of rainbows here and there. Rainbows are one reason to have your camera with you all the time on Oahu -- I've missed more photo opportunities than I can count!
    By the way, the pot of gold at the end of a rainbow is often guarded by an ill-humored leprechaun, so don't bother even starting off on the search unless you're armed with a keg of Guinness

    A partial rainbow arches over Honolulu Rainbow by my house Maunawilli rainbow
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

    Was this review helpful?

  • AKtravelers's Profile Photo

    Look out for Wyland Murals

    by AKtravelers Written Jul 10, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: In Hawaii, there is a local artist whose name is Wyland and is known for painiting large murals of whales and other marine mammals on the sides of otherwise desolate buildings. You will see these murals all over Oahu. Don't fail to appreciate them.
    In Waikiki, there is a Wyland store if you really like his stuff.

    A wyland on a building near the airport
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kaleisu's Profile Photo

    Franko' s Surf/Snorkel/Scuba Maps

    by Kaleisu Written Jan 12, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Available at a store near you on O'ahu. If you plan to surf, snorkel, scuba dive or just want to know where the beaches are - pick up a Franko's Map. They're waterproof/rip-proof and show the topography, major roads, and most importantly - the best beach areas and how to get there. I picked up mine at Matsumoto's General Store on the North Shore for $5.95. Keep in mind that winter/summer will change surf/snorkel conditions, especially on the North Shore. Go here for the best surf report: http://www.surf-news.com/

    Bellows Beach facing South

    Was this review helpful?

  • AKtravelers's Profile Photo

    Japanese Tourists at Pearl Harbor

    by AKtravelers Updated Dec 7, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Don't be surprised by the number of Japanese tourists that you'll see at Pearl Harbor. At times, it seems like they outnumber the American visitors. More importantly, if you are an American reading this, don't be upset at their presence -- welcome them.
    I know many Americans who resent the number of Japanese visitors. I know many older Americans who came of age during World War II that still haven't overcome the feeling of enemnity that they felt during 1940's. That's sad.
    While the attack at Pearl Harbor was a calamitous shock for Americans everywhere and tragic for those men caught unaware, Japanese pilots and mariners also fought and died in this battle. Japanese visitors have as many reasons to visit the battle site as American Southerners have reason to visit Gettysburg or French citizens have the reason to visit Waterloo or, dare I say, Americans to Hiroshima. While one could argue that Pearl Harbor is different because of the dastardly nature of a surprise attack against a nation at peace, that shows a shallow understanding of history. Tensions were growing between Japan and the US and war seemed imminent -- in fact, the Commander at Hickam Air Base ordered all the planes onto the tarmac to prevent acts of Japanese sabotage. The US SHOULD have been prepared. The Japanese realized that an attack on the US was necessary to achieve its war goals -- and the US understood this as well. Given this, should the Japanese have surrendered their best tactic -- that of surprise -- to appease the gods of chivalry? There are many Japanese actions in that war worthy of criticism -- the surprise at Pearl Harbor isn't one of them.
    But the best reason to be understanding of the Japanese visitors is that Pearl Harbor, by bringing the US into the war, sealed the defeat of the Empire. As a man I dined with in Japan once said "We Japanese are so much better off that we lost this war -- our individual lives are much better under democracy than they would have been has we won."

    Moe chats with some Japanese visitors at Pearl Har
    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • AKtravelers's Profile Photo

    Hawaiian Words in English: Not Just for Tourists

    by AKtravelers Updated Feb 25, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: When I first visited Hawaii, I was quick to notice the use of "Aloha", "Mahalo" and a few other Hawaiian words in conversation and I figured it was just an affectation to make tourists feel like they were in a more exotic locale. However, now that we live here we realize that these words are used in every day life by every resident of Oahu and even appear in front page newspaper stories (e.g. the fatal pedestrian accident occured just ewa of Kahili Street). Mahalo is not used just to thank tourists but is even used to than people over after announcements at the gym. Speaking of the gym, I was once asked if I was "pau" with a piece of equipment -- finished. So don't think of the use of these words sounding fake.

    Fondest memory: Here are some good Hawaiian words (and we're sure we've missed a few):
    pau: finished
    pau hana: end of the day
    ohana: family & friends
    mauka: mountain side
    makai: oceanside
    ewa: towards ewa or west
    akami: smart/kowlegeable

    Angus takes language lessons from some locals
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Beaches

    Was this review helpful?

  • Waalewiener's Profile Photo

    The Polynesian Culture Center.

    by Waalewiener Updated Mar 28, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: This is a living Museum and Culture Center were the recreation of tribals and their customs ,Art ,Crafts and Sport is shown.
    This Cultural Center is located next to the Campus of the BYU Hawaii, and it is along the road S.R -83. The site is 42 acres large.

    Fondest memory: Hwy, 83 Laie Hawaii.
    Open Monday to Saturday 12.30 -9.30 pm.
    Canoe Pageant Mon -Sat 2.30 pm.
    Evening Pageant Mon -Sat 7.30 pm.
    Imax Theather Mon-Sat 2-7 pm.
    General admission Adults $27 Child 5-11 $16.Gateway Package Adult $47 Child 5-11
    $30 Dinner and show included.
    Luau Package Adult $59 Child 5-11 $59
    Dinner and evening Show included.
    Ambassador Package Adult $95 Child 5-11
    $63 Special Guided service.
    .

    Polenysian Culture Center
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Waalewiener's Profile Photo

    Holona Blow Hole Oahu South Eastern Shore.

    by Waalewiener Written Mar 26, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: This Blow hole is a favorite diving and snorkeling site, but also the most dangerous
    onthe Island of Oahu.
    There is a strong Current here and slippery
    Rocks , there are no life guards here , so it can be dangerous.
    The nearest facilities to the Blow Hole is Sandy beach a little North of Blow Hole.

    Fondest memory: To get to the Blow Hole on the South East Shore you pass Hanauma Bay and there will be a Tourist Turnout at the road.

    Holona Blow Hole
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Beaches

    Was this review helpful?

  • Waalewiener's Profile Photo

    Kualoa Farms Tropical Ranch.

    by Waalewiener Updated Mar 27, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: This is beautiful place with diversity , It is a ranch , a tropical farm , it has stores sells flowers there are activities like horseback riding, You can hold events company, wedding, sport events , special events .
    They sell fruits Macadamiam Nuts , Coffee. Flowers. There is so much to do here, a great place for tour buses to stop and show the visitors around , I recomment you will visit this Tropical Farm.

    Fondest memory: The Flowers , the fruits the plants , the surrounding , it is really a beautiful place to visit and the coffee and the nuts are pretty good also.
    Adress : 49-227A Kamehameha Highway.
    Kaaawa Hawaii 96744
    Toll free 1-877-505 -6887 Tel.808-237-1960.

    Kualoa nurseries.
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Waalewiener's Profile Photo

    The Hawaiian Mormon Temple in Oahu.

    by Waalewiener Written Mar 28, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The first ever Temple constructed outside the continental United States built in 1919
    The Temple is built from volcanic rock, in the form of a Greek cross and it is surrounded by magnificent terraced Garden and reflecting Pools.

    Fondest memory: Free guided Tours are available from the Polynesian Center every 15 minutes.
    The Mormon Temple is open from 9.am till 8 pm.
    Adress 55-600 Naniloa Loop, Laie, Hawaii.
    Tel.808-293-9297.

    Mormon Temple.
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Hawai'i's most famous artist and former "Dieguito"

    by RblWthACoz Written Jan 9, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Jean Charlot's contribution to the arts in Hawai'i is unmatched. Frankly, it would be extremely difficult to make as much of an impact as he has. Born in Paris, his background was typically Hawai'ian - oddly mixed. His father was from a French and Mexican Indian background. His mother was of Spanish descent.

    Working in Mexico with Diego Rivera as an assistant (earning him that title Dieguito - little Diego), he contributed to numerous works as well as doing his own. It was in 1949 that he came to the University of Hawai'i to do a fresco for the main administration building (Relation of Man and Nature in Old Hawai'i). He accepted a position as professor of art at the university and remained in Hawai'i until his death.

    Charlot's works are powerfully moving and accurately portray the grace of the Hawai'ian culture. If you want to see his works, there are many places throughout the island (and other islands as well). If you are going to be at the Hawai'i Covnention Center, there is a large display there. Across the street and not far away at the Ala Moana Hotel, there is one of his sculptures. The University of Hawai'i also contains many of his works.

    Madonna and Child (Maryknoll School)

    Was this review helpful?

  • So you want to see the BIG waves??

    by RblWthACoz Written Jan 9, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: If you are hoping to see big waves on the North Shore, remember that tey are not a year round phenomenon. Only in the winter months will the big waves come. And even then they will only come at particular times when conditions are right. If you're going in the winter time, keep an eye on the surf reports. If you're coming in the summer - don't expect much of anything.

    Was this review helpful?

  • The right kind of coffee to buy

    by RblWthACoz Updated Jan 9, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: If you want Kona coffee, be particular about what you purchase. Many coffees are "Kona blends" which will not be the best you can get. Only buy it if it says "100% Kona Coffee", if you want the really good stuff. The blends are much weaker of course and don't have the purest Kona style to them that you can get.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Racial Backgrounds

    by RblWthACoz Written Jan 9, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Hawai'i's unique history has led it to have some very interesting racial backgrounds of it's people. In the United States, people claiming to be of more than one race is about 3% to 4% of the population. In Hawai'i, 25% claim to be of more than one race.

    Was this review helpful?

Oahu Hotels

See all 231 Hotels in Oahu

Top Oahu Hotels

Honolulu Hotels
2003 Reviews - 4783 Photos
Waikiki Hotels
335 Reviews - 842 Photos
Haleiwa Hotels
64 Reviews - 163 Photos
Hawaii Kai Hotels
9 Reviews - 25 Photos
Kailua Hotels
63 Reviews - 176 Photos
Kaimuki Hotels
See nearby hotels
Kalihi Hotels
See nearby hotels
Kaneohe Hotels
17 Reviews - 60 Photos
Mililani Town Hotels
See nearby hotels
Aiea Hotels
3 Hotels
Ewa Beach Hotels
3 Reviews - 20 Photos
Honokai Hale Hotels
1 Hotel
Kaaawa Hotels
2 Hotels
Kahuku Hotels
12 Reviews - 48 Photos
Laie Hotels
20 Reviews - 35 Photos

Instant Answers: Oahu

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

24 travelers online now

Comments

Oahu Favorites

Reviews and photos of Oahu favorites posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Oahu sightseeing.
Map of Oahu