Pearl Harbor, Honolulu

4.5 out of 5 stars 84 Reviews

Arizona Memorial; Battleship Missouri; Bowfin

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  • ValbyDK's Profile Photo

    USS Missouri

    by ValbyDK Updated Sep 22, 2007

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    USS Missouri
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    The battleship USS Missouri was in 1999 moved to Pearl Harbor from the United States west coast, and docked near the USS Arizona Memorial. It was on the deck of the USS Missouri that Japan's leaders surrendered on September 2, 1945, marking the end of World War II.

    For more details, check out my ‘Travelogue’ about Pearl Harbor.

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    We had a 60 minute walking tour with a very knowledgeable guide. Furthermore, one of the other visitors was a navy veteran, and he told some interesting stories.

    This is also a good history lesson, and a must-see if visiting Hawaii.

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    USS Arizona Memorial

    by ValbyDK Updated Sep 22, 2007

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    USS Arizona Memorial
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    The USS Arizona is the final resting place for many of the ship's 1177 crewmen who lost their lives on December 7, 1941 then the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor.

    You start your visit at the visitor center. First a National Park Service Ranger will give you a brief talk, followed by a 23-minute documentary film on the Pearl Harbor attack. After the film, there is boat transportation to and from the Memorial. The entire program takes 75 minutes.

    For more details, check out my ‘Travelogue’ about Pearl Harbor.

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    I found the visit to be a great history lesson, and a very emotional experience. You are visiting the final resting place of 1177 sailors and marines.

    Pearl Harbor is a must-see if visiting Hawaii.

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    USS Bowfin

    by ValbyDK Updated Sep 14, 2007

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    USS Bowfin

    USS Bowfin (SS/AGSS-287) is a Balao-class submarine, and was commissioned on the 1st of May 1943 with Commander Joseph H. Willingham in command.

    Bowfin completed nine war patrols during World War II and was one of the top-scoring U.S. submarines of World War II. A sad story was the hit of an unmarked passenger ship carrying civilians - including many schoolchildren.

    Today, the submarine is located at the USS Bowfin Submarine Museum & Park (next to the USS Arizona Memorial). You can visit a museum, outdoor exhibits and a waterfront memorial to the 52 U.S. submarines lost during World War II.

    We didn’t visit the park, but only saw the USS Bowfin from the USS Arizona Memorial.

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    Pearl harbor-USS Arizona Memorial

    by machomikemd Written Jul 30, 2007

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    Remembering Pearl Harbor
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    December 7, 2008 marks the 66th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and The United States' entry into World War II. Pearl Harbor and the USS Arizona Memorial remain top tourist destinations in Hawaii with over 1,500,000 visitors annually. The addition of the Battleship Missouri and the 1999 opening of the USS Missouri Memorial has further enhanced the importance of this historic area. The memorial, dedicated in 1962, spans the sunken hull of the battleship without touching it. Since it opened in 1980, the National Park Service has operated the USS Arizona Memorial Visitor Center associated with the memorial. Historical information about the attack, boat access to the memorial, and general visitor services are available at the center. The 19,585 pound anchor of the Arizona is displayed at the entrance of the visitor center.

    three main parts to the national memorial: entry, assembly room, and shrine. At the entry, visitors pass one of the battleship's two bells. The central assembly room features seven large open windows on either wall and ceiling, to commemorate the date of the attack. It also contains an opening in the floor overlooking the sunken decks of the oil-seeping wreck. (The oil seeping is sometimes referred to as "black tears" or "the tears of the Arizona". It is from this opening that visitors come to pay their respects by tossing flowers and lei in honor of the fallen sailors. Every President of the United States since Franklin D. Roosevelt, and every Emperor of Japan since Hirohito, has made a pilgrimage to the site. The shrine at the far end is a marble wall that bears the names of all those killed on the USS Arizona, protected behind velvet ropes. Contrary to popular belief, the USS Arizona is no longer in commission. As a special tribute to the ship and her lost crew, the United States flag flies from the flagpole, which is attached to the severed mainmast of the sunken battleship. Every day a different flag is raised, the previous day's flag folded and given to special persons.

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    Great Historic Site

    by SJTravel Written Jun 28, 2007

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    Get there early!!!! This is a VERY popular place to visit and if you want to see it, its best to get there as early as possible. The first time I tried to see it, I got there around 9:30AM and that was too late. The lines were enormously long. However, I went back a couple days later much earlier and the line was basically nill. We got in so quickly. Before going out to the actual site, you watch an informational video. That was really cool. Then you take a boat out to the site. When I was out there, although I was amazed at what I was seeing, I couldn't get it out of my head that it was a tomb. It is sort of eerie to be out there, but definitely worth the experience. When you take the boat back, I would recommend checking out the USS Bowfin as well. I thought it was neat to be able to explore what a submarine looked like inside.

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    Naval memorials

    by scaleguy Written Jun 15, 2007

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    USS Arizona as seen from USS Bowfin
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    Very somber location. There are many activities including the USS Arizona, USS Missouri, USS Bowfin and a memorial to submariners still on patrol.
    The USS Arizona museum is fairly complete and exhibits are wonderful.

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    Pearl Harbor

    by April1985 Written Jan 17, 2007

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    I am not very into the military, or politics, or anything like that. I probably should be, but, what can i say ... im not. I went here because my mom wanted to see this very badly. So, im a nice daughter, and i went with her. We had reservations for dinner at 5:30 do we werent able to see the arizona memorial, since we arrived late. We were able to go on the submarine, and check out how that was . It was very small , 6 people could sleep in on bunkbeds in what looks to be like a closet. the toilets were like a stand up shower with a toilet and a glass door. there were kitchens and desks, very small, very crazy that people lived there. there was a museum as well , and it had a lot of great information , and things that really made you think about what they have done , and , it makes you feel things that you would have never thought you would ever feel . especially the photography they had . it makes you feel like you were there . even reading the post cards and little notes that they had , just ... really ... makes you think ... if you get a change to visit oahu , you should try to visit this place .

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  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Pearl Harbor - USS Arizona Memorial

    by SLLiew Written Oct 17, 2006

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    This is amazing guided tour to the site where World War II started for United States with the bombing of Pearl Harbor by the Japanese Imperial military forces.

    You can see below the sea the remains of USS Arizona in its resting place where many of the battleship's 1,177 crew members who lost their lives. The day was December 7, 1941.

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    U.S.S. Arizona Memorial

    by Hopkid Written Apr 22, 2006

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    Operated by the National Park Service, the memorial to the crew members of the U.S.S. Arizona who perished on the morning of December 7, 1941 is a moving experience. The memorial itself sits in the waters of Pearl Harbor on Battleship Row where the Arizona and ofther battleships were moored on that fateful morning. The Arizona and Oklahoma were total losses and while the Oklahoma was eventually removed and salvaged, the majority of the Arizona was left on the bottom of Pearl Harbor. The memorial sits directly above the fallen ship and visitors can view the battleship just below the surface of the water. Small passenger boats operated by the U.S. Navy take visitors in shifts out to the memorial which can only accomodate 100 or so visitors at a time. As a result there are limited number of visitors allowed each day.

    TIP 1: Get to the visitor's center as early as possible, in order to get timed tickets which tell you when you can view the introductory video and then catch the launch to the memorial. We arrived just before 8am and there was already quite a line. We got tickets for the 9:30 program. The last program of the day is a 3pm and the tickets will likely be gone well before that. Don't bother going after 12 noon if it's the busy summer season.

    TIP 2: Due to increased security measure since 9/11, anything that can be a means for concealment is not allowed on the tour. That means purses, backpacks, fanny packs, etc. Save yourself some headache and leave them in the car. Cameras are allowed, just don't bring them in a camera bag.

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  • PearL Harbor is worth the visit

    by TX2007 Written Mar 21, 2006

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    For historical buffs, you will want to take a visit to the Pearl Harbor Exhibit. It is intriguing, sad, and a historical highlight. It reminds us that bad things can happen, even in paradise. You take a bus or drive to the museum where you buy a ticket for a boat that takes you out to the USS Constitution, the water locked shrine for those who lost their lives. It's as if time stands still here and you are instantly transported to that fateful day. The day I vistied, noone uttered a word while we were on the USS Constitution. This is definitely a burial ground and it is treated as such. Take the time to browse the memorabilia in the museum while you await your turn on the boat. There are facts about Dorre Miller and others heroic figures that are worthy of your attention.

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    Pay Your Respects at Pearl Harbor

    by Rixie Updated Jan 11, 2006

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    Plaque, USS Arizona Memorial

    The story of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor has always been very vivid to me. On December 7, 1941, "a day that shall live in infamy," my parents were youngsters living on Oahu. My father heard the hum of war planes flying over the island and later saw smoke rising from Pearl Harbor. My mother was with her family at Sunday Mass; she heard whispering and watched, startled, as American servicemen in uniform suddenly jumped up and ran out of the church.

    I grew up with these stories ( "This is not a drill! This is the real McCoy!") and was very glad, many years later, to be able to honor our dead at the USS Arizona. At the Visitors Center we browsed through wartime exhibits and viewed a documentary. We were then were taken by boat to the Memorial, which is in the middle of the harbor, built on top of the sunken Arizona.

    This is a very powerful experience and a glimpse into an important event in American history.

    Admission is free, but there is a great deal of competition for tickets, which are issued on a first come, first served basis. A limited number of tickets are available each day, and large tour groups come through, so it's best to get there as early as you can.

    The park is open 7 days a week , 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The last program begins at 3:00. Closed on Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's. No children under the age of 5 are admitted. The tour is self-guided, but audio tours may be rented in English, French, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin, German, and Spanish.

    Please be aware that strict security measures are in force. You will be allowed to carry only a camera or camcorder. All purses, backpacks, diaper bags, etc., must be left in rented lockers. Because this is a memorial, there is also a dress code. Civilians must wear shirts and footwear -- no bathing suits. Military must wear Class B uniforms.

    You may also want to visit the USS Bowfin Submarine Museum & Park and the Battleship Missouri, which are located nearby.

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    Pearl Harbour

    by Redlats Updated Sep 28, 2005

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    U.S.S. Missouri and Arizona Memorial

    We spent a day at Pearl Harbour - you have to start early in the day to see everything. There are really three different ships to see, and the free tickets to the USS Arizona get given out first-come, first-served. See the Arizona Memorial first -- the tribute to the 1,200 Americans still buried with their ship on the day the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbour (Dec. 7, 1941). You see a movie, then board a boat to the Memorial which straddles the USS Arizona sitting just below sea level. Sixty years after it happened, and oil still seeps from the sunken ship - reflecting rainbow colours off the top of the ocean - almost poetic.

    Next, tour the U.S.S.Bowfin -- a WW II submarine. You get to board the sub and re-live a WW II mission via a self-guided tour on a walkman.

    The final ship at the site is the U.S.S.Missouri - The Mighty Mo -- the battleship on which the Japanese officially surrendered after WW II. The Missouri also saw action in the Gulf war. The Battleship Missouri is a huge ship - easy to get lost on her.

    By the way, if you actually do visit all three ships in one day, it is a l-o-n-g day. Our kids (who are older teens) lost patience with historic ships somewhere between the Bowfin and the Missouri.

    The Arizona Memorial is free - After the Arizona, just around the corner is the Bowfin. Tickets for the Bowfin and the Missouri are bought at the same spot. The price in 2001 to see both is $18 for older-than-kids.

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  • Blatherwick's Profile Photo

    USS Missouri

    by Blatherwick Updated Sep 13, 2005

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    USS Missouri

    In 1999, the battleship USS Missouri was moved to Pearl Harbor from the United States west coast and docked near and perpendicular to the USS Arizona Memorial. Upon the deck of the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay, the Japanese surrendered to United States General Douglas MacArthur, ending World War II. A plaque marks this spot. Also of interest is the place where a kamikaze plane crashed into the ship. When I last went they had a UAV on the flight deck which was used during the Gulf War to spot for the battleship's huge 16 inch guns.

    The USS Missouri was the last battleship to be built by the United States During World War II, the Missouri saw action at the Battle of Iwo Jima and the Battle of Okinawa, as well as participating in the shelling of the Japanese home islands of Hokkaido and Honshu¯. In the 1950s, Missouri saw action in the Korean War, after which she was decommissioned into the United States Navy reserve fleets. She was recommissioned in the 1980s, and refitted with modern armaments. Later, she participated in the Gulf War. Missouri was decommissioned a final time on March 31, 1992, having received a total of eight battle stars.

    General admission to the USS Missouri is $14 and it is open daily from 9-5.

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    Utah Memorial

    by Blatherwick Written Sep 3, 2005

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    Utah Memorial

    On the north side of Ford Island in Pearl Harbour is where the Utah Memorial is located. The USS Utah was sunk in the attack on the United States Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. The battle-scarred and submerged remains of the battleship are the focal point of a shrine honoring Utah's crew, 58 of whom lost their lives while trying to save their torpedoed ship.

    Utah's career as both a battleship and target ship spanned three decades and included nationally significant service with international implications, including the American landings at Veracruz, Mexico in 1914, and World War I service. Utah's was altered from battleship to auxiliary ship (target and gunnery training) because of conditions dictated by the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922 was part of a disarmament program.

    There is now a bridge to Ford Island thus the USS Utah memorial can be visited more easily. There is a Guard Gate on the bridge, and entrance requires prior arrangement with the Navy, or be escorted by an Active Duty or Retired Military person.

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    Arizona Memorial

    by Blatherwick Updated Sep 3, 2005

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    Arizona Memorial

    The USS Arizona Memorial memorializes the resting place of 1,102 sailors killed on the USS Arizona during the Attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941 by Japan. The memorial spans the sunken hull of the battleship without touching it. The attack on Pearl Harbor was the action that forced United States involvement in World War II.

    There are three main parts to the national monument: entry, assembly room, and shrine. At the entry, visitors pass the battleship's bell. The central assembly room contains an opening in the floor overlooking the sunken decks of the oil-seeping wreck. (The oil seeping is sometimes referred to as "the tears of the Arizona".) It is from this opening that visitors come to pay their respects by tossing flowers and leis in honor of the fallen soldiers. Every President of the United States since Franklin D. Roosevelt, and every Emperor of Japan since Hirohito, has made a pilgrimage to the site. The shrine at the far end is a marble wall that bears the names of all those killed on the USS Arizona, protected behind velvet ropes and guards of honor. A new flag is hoisted each morning over the monument using a main mast recovered from the USS Arizona.

    The memorial was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1966. While the actual wreck of the USS Arizona was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1989, the memorial itself does not share in this status. Rather, it is listed separately from the wreck on the National Register of Historic Places and is not itself a National Historic Landmark, contrary to popular belief.

    Every United States Navy, Coast Guard, and Merchant Marines vessel entering Pearl Harbor participates in the tradition of manning the rails. Personnel serving on these ships stand at attention at the rails and salute the USS Arizona Memorial as their ship goes into port. More recently, as foreign military vessels are entering Pearl Harbor for joint military exercises, foreign troops have participated in the traditional "manning the rails".

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