Hawaiian History, Oahu

8 Reviews

Know about this?

hide
  • Hawaiian History
    by cjg1
  • Hawaiian History
    by cjg1
  • double rainbow
    double rainbow
    by FRONA
  • Gypsystravels's Profile Photo

    Outrigger

    by Gypsystravels Updated Jan 28, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Throughout O'ahu and many of the other islands you'll get a glimpse of a "canoe" or "kayak" that will have an outrigger. An outrigger is a rigging that is placed in a fixed position outside of the main hull.

    The more common outriggers in O'ahu are the flat hollow floats that stabilize the canoes and kayaks. The outrigger floats form a narrow second hull, made of wood or fiberglass, that extends parallel to the side of the craft.

    Using an outrigger float prevents the canoe/kayak from rolling or capsizing in high winds or heavy waves. It allows the rowers and also the passengers to stand in the canoe/kayak without fear of over turning, to get a better viewing ahead of them.

    In O'ahu outrigger canoeing is a big sport with many clubs and sporting events that happen throughout the year. The major event is held here in Oahu every year sometime around September.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Kayaking
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    State Flower of Hawaii

    by cjg1 Updated May 19, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The state flower of Hawaii is the Yellow Hibiscus. You can find all colors of Hibiscus growing on the islands but the yellow is the official state flower since 1988. There were several yellow Hibiscus flowers in Oahu especially by the Royal Hawaiian Center and along the beach areas.

    Was this review helpful?

  • AKtravelers's Profile Photo

    King Kamehameha and His Legacy

    by AKtravelers Written Feb 11, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    King Kamehameha I is the monarch who united the Hawaiian islands. At least that's the simple way of looking at it though the history is a bit more complicated. In any event, because of this feat he is revered by Hawaiians in much the same way that George Washington is looked upon in Virginia.

    King Kamehameha in downtown Honolulu
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • FRONA's Profile Photo

    HAWAII - The rainbow state

    by FRONA Updated May 9, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    "Somewhere over the rainbow the skies are blue"... and that place is Hawaii!

    No WONDER the Hawaii state logo on the licence plates is a rainbow! We see multiple rainbows every day here! It seems to "mist" here a lot, not quite raining, but never enough to chase away the sun and white puffy clouds.

    It gave me a special warm feeling every morning as I was a rainbow..... eventhough we know it is just sunlight breaking, somewhere deep inside I am sure we are all still looking for a pot of gold ... just enjoy!

    THE RAINBOWS _ THANKS TO THE CLIMATE
    The outstanding features of Hawaii's climate include mild temperatures throughout the year, moderate humidity, persistence of northeasterly trade winds, significant differences in rainfall within short distances,and infrequent severe storms.
    For most of Hawaii, there are only two seasons: summer, between May and October, and winter, between October and April
    Hawaii is in the tropics, where the length of day and temperature are relatively uniform throughout the year.

    double rainbow
    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

  • AKtravelers's Profile Photo

    Eddie Would Go

    by AKtravelers Written Nov 23, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As you drive around Oahu, especially on the North Shore, you'll see vehicles (often beat-up pick-up trucks) sporting bumper stickers withthe words "Eddie Would Go". This is in tribute to Eddie Aikau, a native Hawaiian and pioneer big wave surfer from the 1970's. Not only did he win several big wave surfing events, but he was also the first lifeguard at Waimea Bay and known for his courageous rescues. It was said that he was fearless -- extra-high, extra rough surf may have caused others to stay home, but Eddie would go. Sadly, he died trying to save fellow passengers in a foundering boat off the coast of Lanai in 1978, but this sealed his legendary status among the hawaiian surfing community. Now the premier big wave surfing event of the year -- for which the world's top surfers travel to the North hore at the moment the waves are big enough is known as "The Eddie".
    If you're interested in more of the story, you can buy the book "Eddie Would Go" anywhere on Oahu. It's a bit hagiographic, but it's an easy beach read and gives a good history of the sport of big wave surfing along the way.

    Eddie would definitely go in these waves
    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Surfing

    Was this review helpful?

  • BLewJay's Profile Photo

    The father of modern surfing

    by BLewJay Written Jul 16, 2005

    Duke Paoa Kahinu Mokoe Hulikohola Kahanamoku was born on the island of Oahu in 1890. He competed in 3 Olympics as a swimmer (1912, 1920 & 1924) and won 3 Gold and 2 Silver medals and was considered, at that time, the greatest swimmer in the world. Known for his honesty, integrity, charisma and of course surfing, a monument was built in his honor on Kuhio Beach.

    LJ poses with the Duke
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • BLewJay's Profile Photo

    King Kamehaneha I Statue

    by BLewJay Written May 31, 2005

    King Kamehameha I conquered and then united the Hawaiian islands and is regarded as one of its greatest warriors. To honor his achievements, a statue was built and is located on the Big Island near where he was born and raised. The replica, which is located in downtown Honolulu and stands in front of Aliiolani Hale/the State Judiciary Building, is at 417 S. King Street (between Punchbowl Street and Mililani Street).

    Hawaii's greatest warrior
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • spartan's Profile Photo

    Waimea Falls

    by spartan Updated May 23, 2003

    0.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The falls (located in Waimea Falls Park) which sits in a narrow canyon extending into the Koolau Mountains was once a heavily populated Hawaiian village. Today the 1,800 acre site between Haleiwa and Kahuku, is a dwelling for nature's lovely, unspoiled environment of tropical plant life, birds, hiking trails and a truly beautiful waterfall.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Water Sports

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Oahu

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

48 travelers online now

Comments

View all Oahu hotels