Historical Sites, Oahu

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    Driving in
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  • Distant view with the Judiciary Building
    Distant view with the Judiciary Building
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    Hawaii State Capitol

    by Yaqui Updated May 24, 2014

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    Commissioned by then-Governor John A. Burns, the Hawaii State Capitol debuted on March 15, 1969. Hawaiis newest government building, which replaced the Iolani Palace as Hawaiis statehouse, was completed with a $26 million price tag. On the north side of the building is an exact replica of Philadelphias Liberty Bell.

    Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau
    2270 Kalakaua Avenue, Suite 801
Honolulu, HI 96815

    800-GoHawaii (1-800-464-2924)
    http://www.gohawaii.com/

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    Iolani Palace Coronation Pavilion

    by Yaqui Updated May 24, 2014

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    This is where King David Kalakaua and Queen Kapiolani were crowned at a coronation ceremony on February 12, 1883. Nowdays they have free concerts by the Royal Hawaiin Band.

    Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau
    2270 Kalakaua Avenue, Suite 801
Honolulu, HI 96815

    800-GoHawaii (1-800-464-2924)
    http://www.gohawaii.com/

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    Hawaii State Library

    by Yaqui Updated May 24, 2014

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    Built in 1913 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the building houses over 500,000 books. It was designed by Henry D. Whitfield. It has many wonderful features such as mural by Juliette May Fraser and mosaic by Hiroki Morinoue in the courtyard.

    Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau
    2270 Kalakaua Avenue, Suite 801
Honolulu, HI 96815

    800-GoHawaii (1-800-464-2924)
    http://www.gohawaii.com/

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    Territorial Building

    by Yaqui Updated May 24, 2014

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    Built in 1925 and designed by the architect Arthur Reynolds, in the Classical Revival architectural style. It serves as the home of the Attorney General of Hawai'i and other state offices. Its a very lovely building.

    Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau
    2270 Kalakaua Avenue, Suite 801
Honolulu, HI 96815

    800-GoHawaii (1-800-464-2924)
    http://www.gohawaii.com/

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    Mission Houses Museum

    by Yaqui Updated May 24, 2014

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    The Misson Houses Museum consists of three mission houses that served as homes and workplaces for the first Christian missionaries who came here starting with the 1821 Mission House (Hale Lā‘au) the oldest wood frame structure still standing in the Hawaiian Islands, it was shipped around Cape Horn from Boston in 1820. It was used as a communal home by many missionary families who shared it with island visitors and boarders.

    Second is the Chamberlain House (Ka Hale Kamalani) (1831), which bears the name of the Mission's first secular agent in Hawai‘i - Levi Chamberlain. In 1831, Chamberlain contracted for the building of this structure, which was to be used as a depository. The building was made of coral blocks cut away from the ocean reef, which were dried and bleached by the sun. These blocks were arranged and assembled to build the Chamberlain House. From this location, Levi Chamberlain was able to plan out and undertake the disbursement of provisions for the entire Sandwich Islands Mission. It now serves as the Museum's temporary Exhibition Gallery.

    The third is the Printing Office (Ka Hale Pa‘i) (1841) which was built from coral blocks, this structure was completed in 1841 and contains a replica of the first printing press to be brought to Hawaii. Here, some of the first books and printed materials in Hawaii were produced. The restored printing office shows how early Protestant Missionaries and native Hawaiians collaborated on the production of numerous books and other printed materials first printed in the Hawaiian language.

    Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau
    2270 Kalakaua Avenue, Suite 801
Honolulu, HI 96815

    800-GoHawaii (1-800-464-2924)
    http://www.gohawaii.com/

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    Kawaiahao Mission Cemetery 1823

    by Yaqui Updated May 24, 2014

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    he Mission Cemetery, established in 1823 on the grounds of Kawaiah a`o Church and maintained by the Hawaiian Mission Children's Society, is the oldest Christian graveyard in Hawai`i.

    A walk through the Cemetery is a trip back in time, with Binghams, Bishops, Alexanders, Chamberlains, Castles, Cookes, Armstrongs and Gulicks buried on the grounds. The first adult missionary buried here was Elizabeth Edwards Bishop (1728 - 1828), the second wife of the Reverend Artemas Bishop, who came to the Islands in 1823 with the Second Company from New Haven. She shares a plot with her husband and her son, the Reverend Sereno Edwards Bishop, who was only a year old when his mother died.

    Also, of three Hawaiian men schooled in Connecticut by the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions that returned to their native Hawai`i to aid the missionaries in the First Company, one, William Kanui (ca. 1796 - 1864) is buried here.http://www.missionhouses.org/index.php/collections/cemetery

    Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau
    2270 Kalakaua Avenue, Suite 801
Honolulu, HI 96815

    800-GoHawaii (1-800-464-2924)
    http://www.gohawaii.com/

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    Iolani Palace 1882

    by Yaqui Updated May 24, 2014

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    Iolani Palace was the official residence of the Hawaiian Kingdom’s last two monarchs from 1882 to 1893: King Kalakaua and his sister and successor, Queen Liliuokalani.

    The palace was a symbol of promise for the Hawaiian Kingdom built by King David Kalakaua, “The Merrie Monarch.” Influenced by European architectural styles, this royal residence included Hawaii’s first electric light system, flush toilets and intra-house telephones. The rich interior features a beautiful koa staircase, dramatic portraits of Hawaiian royalty, ornate furniture and royal gifts and ornaments from around the world.

    In 1893, a provisional U.S. government was established after opposition forces overthrew the Hawaiian monarchy. The Hawaiian Islands were eventually annexed as a United States Territory in 1898. Hawaii became the 50th state in 1959 and during this time Iolani Palace was used as the capitol building until 1968. After falling into disrepair over the years, the Iolani Palace was opened to the public in 1978 after an extensive renovation.

    They have tours of the palace.

    Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau
    2270 Kalakaua Avenue, Suite 801
Honolulu, HI 96815

    800-GoHawaii (1-800-464-2924)
    http://www.gohawaii.com/

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    Lunalilo Mausoleum

    by Yaqui Updated May 24, 2014

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    King Kamehameha V died on December 11, 1872, without naming a successor to the throne. Prince William Charles Lunalilo was the highest ranking Chief at that time. Instead of claiming his birthright to the throne, he wanted the people to choose their next ruler in a democratic way. Lunalilo requested a special election which pitted him against David Kalakaua, a High Chief, but not of the Kamehameha line. Seven days later on January 8, 1873, an entire city cheered as the Legislature proclaimed that Lunalilo was not only “the people’s choice” for king, but “the Legislature’s choice” too. On January 9, 1873, the coronation of Lulalilo took place in Kawaiaha‘o Church.

    King Lunalilo died at thirty-nine years of age on February 3, 1874. He had reigned for only one year and twenty five days. Lunalilo did not name a successor to the throne. He insisted that the choice of the next monarch should rest in the hands of his people. The service for Lunalilo was conducted by the Reverend Henry Parker of Kawaiaha‘o Church and his body was temporarily taken to the Royal Mausoleum in Nu‘uanu Valley until his tomb at Kawaiaha‘o Church was ready.

    One of the king’s last wishes was to be put to rest at Kaiwaia‘o Church instead of the Royal Mausoleum. Lunalilo was “the people’s choice.” They had loved him and he had returned their love. By being buried at the cemetery with the common people he loved he felt he would be closer to them. When the remains of Hawai‘s’s royalty were removed from the Royal Tomb on ‘Iolani Palace grounds and taken to the Royal Mausoleum in Nu‘uanu, the remains of Lunalilo‘s mother, Kekauluohi, were not taken to the Royal Mausoleum. This may have been an oversight; no one knows. However, Lunalilo chose to be buried on Kawaiaha‘o Church grounds and not at the Royal Mausoleum.

    Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau
    2270 Kalakaua Avenue, Suite 801
Honolulu, HI 96815

    800-GoHawaii (1-800-464-2924)
    http://www.gohawaii.com/

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    Kawaiahao Church

    by Yaqui Updated May 24, 2014

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    Dedicated on July 21, 1842, “The Great Stone Church” is made of 14,000 coral slabs from ocean reefs that were hauled from the sea by native laborers and missionaries. The church and the grounds were named a National Historic Landmark in 1962. "Kauikeaouli clock," was donated by King Kamehameha III in 1850. The church still serves as a house of worship and that day I was there, a wedding was taking place.

    Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau
    2270 Kalakaua Avenue, Suite 801
Honolulu, HI 96815

    800-GoHawaii (1-800-464-2924)
    http://www.gohawaii.com

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    King David Kalākaua Bldg~ Customs House/P.O.

    by Yaqui Updated May 24, 2014

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    Built in 1922 as a three story Spanish Colonial revival style, it was supposed to be used as the U.S. Federal Government offices. It was used form many purposes and was used as the US Post Office. After it was bought by a corporation and remodeled, but eventually sold back to the U.S. Post Office for a $1 even after millions of $$ renovations. King David Kalakaua was Post Master from 1863-1865.

    Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau
    2270 Kalakaua Avenue, Suite 801
Honolulu, HI 96815


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    Aliiolani Hale

    by Yaqui Updated May 24, 2014

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    Intended to be used as a royal residence, but was used as government offices. King Kamehameha V laid the first cornerstone in 1872. It was dedicated in 1874 by King David Kalakaua. It was designed by Australian Thomas Rowe. It was renovated in 1911 and added onto in 1940 and now it is used as the Hawaii's State Supreme Court, Judiciary Admin Offices, History Center, and Hawaii's largest law library.

    Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau
    2270 Kalakaua Avenue, Suite 801
Honolulu, HI 96815


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    King Kamehameha Statue

    by Yaqui Updated May 24, 2014

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    King Kamehameha Statue is one of the most photographed statues on the island. It stands in front of Aliiolani Hale and just across the street of Iolani Palance. The first statue was lost at sea, (but later found and erected on the Big Island) so this second statue was sculpted by Thomas Gould of Florence in 1883. It stands 18 feet and made out of bronze.

    King Kamehameha was a great warrior, diplomat and leader, King Kamehameha I united the Hawaiian Islands into one royal kingdom in 1810 after years of conflict. Kamehameha I was destined for greatness from birth. Hawaiian legend prophesized that a light in the sky with feathers like a bird would signal the birth of a great chief. Historians believe Kamehameha was born in 1758, the year Halley’s Comet passed over Hawaii.

    Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau
    2270 Kalakaua Avenue, Suite 801
Honolulu, HI 96815


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    “Aloha `Oe”~Till We Meet Again

    by Yaqui Updated May 9, 2014

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    These beautiful lyrics were written by Quenn Liliuokalani (born Sept. 2, 1838, Honolulu, Hawaii [U.S.]—died Nov. 11, 1917, Honolulu), first and only reigning Hawaiian queen and the last Hawaiian sovereign to govern the islands, which were annexed by the United States in 1898. It was during this difficult time she wrote this lovely song! Below is a youtube link of her song.

    “Aloha `Oe” Lyrics

    Ha`aheo ka ua i nâ pali
    Ke nihi a`ela i ka nahele
    E hahai (uhai) ana paha i ka liko
    Pua `âhihi lehua o uka

    Hui
    Aloha `oe, aloha `oe
    E ke onaona noho i ka lipo
    One fond embrace,
    A ho`i a`e au
    Until we meet again

    `O ka hali`a aloha i hiki mai
    Ke hone a`e nei i
    Ku`u manawa
    `O `oe nô ka`u ipo aloha
    A loko e hana nei

    Maopopo ku`u `ike i ka nani
    Nâ pua rose o Maunawili
    I laila hia`ia nâ manu
    Miki`ala i ka nani o ka lipo

    Translation:
    Proudly swept the rain by the cliffs
    As it glided through the trees
    Still following ever the bud
    The `ahihi lehua of the vale

    Chorus
    Farewell to you, farewell to you
    The charming one who dwells in the shaded bowers
    One fond embrace,
    ‘Ere I depart
    Until we meet again

    Sweet memories come back to me
    Bringing fresh remembrances
    Of the past
    Dearest one, yes, you are mine own
    From you, true love shall never depart

    I have seen and watched your loveliness
    The sweet rose of Maunawili
    And ’tis there the birds of love dwell
    And sip the honey from your lips

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    Iolani Palace~Basement Gallery Exhibits

    by Yaqui Written May 8, 2014

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    I very much wanted to take the guided tour, but time was running out and plus I didn't want my hubby to wait to long for me, so I toured the Basement Gallery Exhibits. It was only $7 and worth every penny. The exhibit included the Royal collection of the Hawaiin crown jewels, photo's of the extensive restoration of the palace, restored kitchen, and many wonderful historic photographs of the Hawaiin Royals.

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    Helumoa~Waikiki Historic Trail

    by Yaqui Updated May 3, 2014

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    Surrounded by this open landscape, one can imagine the huge coconut grove known as Helumoa. Planted by Chief Kakuhihewa around the 15th century, the grove once had nearly 10,000 trees. Kahuamokomoki was an area nearby that served as a sporting field. Boxing, wrestling, foot races and other games were played there. Ulumaika, the round stones used for a bowling-type game, were discovered on this site during excavation and contruction of the Royal Hawaiian Hotel. Kamehameha the Great and his warriors camped near here when they began their conquest of O'ahu in 1795. Later, he would build a stone house for himself, as well as redidences for his wives and retainers in an area known as Pua'ali'ili'i. Kamehameha ended Waikiki nearly 400 year reign as O'ahu's capital when he moved the royal headquarters to Honolulu (known then as Kou) in 1808.

    "Legend tells us of a Phantom Rooster liviing in Palolo Valley known as Ka'auhelemoa. People in Waikiki often heard him crowing, but could never catch sight of him. One day, the Phantom Rooster landed in front of Kakuhihewa, Chief of O'ahu, and began scratching at the ground. The bird disappeared as suddenly as he had come. Kakuhihewa had his men plant a coconut on the spot. A great tree known as Helumoa (literally, chicken scratch) grew and became the parent of all the others in the grove and for centuries was the tallest of them all."

    Eventually, Kamehameha V, Lot Kapuaiwa, built his modest residence here among the palms. The property was inherited by his half-sister, Princess Ruth Ke'elikolani, who later willed it to Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop. Much of Helumoa is still owned by Kamehameha Schools, a Bernice Pauahi Bishop legacy and institution that educates thousands of Native Hawaiian children across the State. The nearby Royal Hawaiian Hotel, also known as the Pink Palace, was completed in 1927 at a cost of $5 million. With 400 lavishly decorated rooms and Spanish-Moorish style architecture, it was then touted as the "finest resort hostelry in American." This beautiful park is owned by the City & County of Honolulu. It was developed by Graham Murata Russell and Mutual of New York Life Insurance Company in 1989 and is privately maintained for the residents and visitors of Hawai'i. The tallest coconut palms in the park date back to the 1930s.

    Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau
    2270 Kalakaua Avenue, Suite 801
Honolulu, HI 96815


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