Memorials, Oahu

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  • Memorials
    by Yaqui
  • Memorials
    by cjg1
  • Memorials
    by cjg1
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    National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific

    by Yaqui Updated May 26, 2014

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    The “Punchbowl” was formed some 75,000 to 100,000 years ago during the Honolulu period of secondary volcanic activity. A crater resulted from the ejection of hot lava through cracks in the old coral reefs which, at the time, extended to the foot of the Koolau Mountain Range.

    Although there are various translations of the Punchbowl’s Hawaiian name, “Puowaina,” the most common is “Hill of Sacrifice.” This translation closely relates to the history of the crater. The first known use was as an altar where Hawaiians offered human sacrifices to pagan gods and the killed violators of the many taboos. Later, during the reign of Kamehameha the Great, a battery of two cannons was mounted at the rim of the crater to salute distinguished arrivals and signify important occasions. Early in the 1880s, leasehold land on the slopes of the Punchbowl opened for settlement and in the 1930s, the crater was used as a rifle range for the Hawaii National Guard. Toward the end of World War II, tunnels were dug through the rim of the crater for the placement of shore batteries to guard Honolulu Harbor and the south edge of Pearl Harbor.

    During the late 1890s, a committee recommended that the Punchbowl become the site for a new cemetery to accommodate the growing population of Honolulu. The idea was rejected for fear of polluting the water supply and the emotional aversion to creating a city of the dead above a city of the living.
    Fifty years later, Congress authorized a small appropriation to establish a national cemetery in Honolulu with two provisions: that the location be acceptable to the War Department, and that the site would be donated rather than purchased. In 1943, the governor of Hawaii offered the Punchbowl for this purpose. The $50,000 appropriation proved insufficient, however, and the project was deferred until after World War II. By 1947, Congress and veteran organizations placed a great deal of pressure on the military to find a permanent burial site in Hawaii for the remains of thousands of World War II servicemen on the island of Guam awaiting permanent burial. Subsequently, the Army again began planning the Punchbowl cemetery; in February 1948 Congress approved funding and construction began.

    Prior to the opening of the cemetery for the recently deceased, the remains of soldiers from locations around the Pacific Theater—including Wake Island and Japanese POW camps—were transported to Hawaii for final interment. The first interment was made Jan. 4, 1949. The cemetery opened to the public on July 19, 1949, with services for five war dead: an unknown serviceman, two Marines, an Army lieutenant and one civilian—noted war correspondent Ernie Pyle. Initially, the graves at National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific were marked with white wooden crosses and Stars of David—like the American cemeteries abroad—in preparation for the dedication ceremony on the fourth anniversary of V-J Day. Eventually, over 13,000 soldiers and sailors who died during World War II would be laid to rest in the Punchbowl.

    One of the places we wanted to see because we have family listed on the Tablets of the Missing. It was sombering to see our family and name eteched with honor.

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    Map Galleries~National Memorial Cemetery

    by Yaqui Updated May 24, 2014

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    The map galleries extend from the right and left sides of the tower. Inscribed upon the frieze of the galleries are the names of places which attained notable significance in the proud record of our Armed Forces: PEARL HARBOR, WAKE, CORAL SEA, MIDWAY, ATTU, SOLOMONS, GILBERTS, MARSHALLS, MARIANAS, LEYTE, IWO JIMA, OKINAWA, TOKYO, AND KOREA. The orginal maps in the galleries are each ten feet high, were designed by Richard and Carlotta Gonzales Lahey of Vienna, Virginia from data prepared for that purpose by the American Battle Monuments Commission. They wre of scagliola, i.e. paintings on a special composition applied to Carrara marble surface and glazed. This material didn't far well due to Hawaii's climate and were replaced in 1968-1972. The new maps are of mosaic concrete and colored glass aggregate and designed by Mrs. Mary Morse Hamilton Jacobs of Glenelg, Maryland. Each of these maps descripes each of the battles during WWII.

    They are fantastic in person and I feel it is an honor to finally see them in person.

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    Chapel~National Memorial Cemetery

    by Yaqui Updated May 24, 2014

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    Built in 1964 and located behind the Lady Columbia, is the non-sectarian chapel. The altar has the cross in the middle and flanked by the Star of David and the Buddhist Wheel of Righteousness Buddhists. The chapel altar, stairs, and floor are Verde Antico marble. The Latin Cross is displayed on Rojo Alicante marble. Sculptor Bruce Moore designed the glass cabochons that are within the art-deco-ish bronze altar, which are lit electrically. The cabochons on the chapel's windows and doors are beautiful lit by the sun.

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    Lady Columbia~National Memorial Cemetery

    by Yaqui Written May 9, 2014

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    She is a 30 foot female figure standing on the symbolized prow of a U.S. Navy carrier with a laurel branch in her left hand. The words below her were written by President Lincoln to a Mrs. Bixby, mother of five sons who had died in battle. "The Solemn Pride tht must be yours to have laid so costly a sacrifice upon the altar of freedom." She was designed by Bruce Moore of Washington D.C. Fillippo Cecchettio of Tivoli and Ugo Quaglieri of Rome, Italy carved the sculpture under the direction of Mr. Moore.

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    King David Kalākaua 1836–1891

    by Yaqui Updated Apr 23, 2014

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    David Kalākaua was born on November 16, 1836. He succeeded to the throne on February 12, 1874, and ruled with his queen, Kapi‘olani. King Kalākaua was the catalyst for the revival and flowering of Hawaiian intellectual and artistic traditions that took place in the last quarter of the 19th century.

    He was an accomplished musician and, among other chants and songs, composed he words of “Hawai‘i Pono’i,” now the State of Hawaii’s official anthem. His motto was “Ho‘oulu lāhui” (Let the Hawaiian race flourish). He was also a skilled sailor and loved the sea. ‘Iolani Palace, the only royal palace in the United States and one of Hawai‘i’s most famous landmark, was built during his reign.

    Thoroughly Hawaiian but also cosmopolitan, he completed a tour around the world in 1881, including a visit to the United States in 1874, the first monarch in the world to have done so. His coronation took place on the grounds of ‘Iolani Palace on February 12, 1883. Kalākaua died on January 20, 1891. He was buried in the Royal Mausoleum in Nu‘uanu Valley on O‘ahu.

    “Kukui ‘ā mau i ke awakea.” (The torch that continues to burn in daylight.) —Kalākaua family motto.

    Plaque on the opposite side: David Laamea Kamanakapuu Mahinulani Naloiaehuokalani Lumialani Kalakaua, 1836–1891. This statue of King David Kalakaua (1836–1891) was commissioned by the Oahu Kanyaku Imin Centennial Committee on behalf of the Japanese-American community in 1985 in observance of the arrival of the first ship carrying 944 Kanyaku Imin, or government-contract immigrants, from Japan to Hawaii on February 8, 1885, to work on the sugar plantations.

    King Kalakaua visited Japan in May, 1881, on his trip around the world and appealed to Emperor Meiji to send immigrants to Hawaii to relieve the shortage of laborers on sugar plantations. This resulted in the signing of the Japan-Hawaii Labor Convention. Japanese numbering 220,000 immigrated to Hawaii from 1885 to 1924 when the Oriental Exclusion Act was enacted by the congress of the United States.

    The Japanese-Americans, who are descendants of these immigrants, have been successful in numerous fields and prospered here in Hawaii. The King is honored as the “Father of Japanese Immigration to Hawaii.” This statue is a symbol of appreciation and Aloha to King Kalakaua, a visionary monarch, for inviting their forebears to Hawaii.

    Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau
    Suite 801, Waikiki Business Plaza
    2270 Kalakaua Avenue
    Honolulu, HI 96815

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    Chester William Nimitz Statue

    by cjg1 Updated Feb 5, 2014

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    When I saw the statue of Chester Nimitz bu the USS Missouri; I knew I had to get a pic with it.
    Chester Nimitz was a Fleet Admiral of the United States Navy. He held the dual command of Commander in Chief, United States Pacific Fleet for U.S. naval forces and Commander in Chief, Pacific Ocean Areas, for U.S. and Allied air, land, and sea forces during World War II.

    When I was in the Navy I was aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt which is a Nimitz-class aircraft carrier; being named for the Admiral.

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    U.S.S Bowfin

    by Vikefan Updated Apr 4, 2011

    We explored the USS Bowfin Submarine. It was really neat to see the actual size of the interior of a sub, especially if you like to watch the WWII movies. While on the topside, we saw a large Jellyfish next to the Bowfin, which was a real nice surprise. I could not imagine all the guys that they had aboard one of these vessels, and moving around during battles would invite some serious head trauma from hitting pipes, knobs, low ceilings, ect. The Bowfin was nicknamed the Avenger of Pearl Harbor, since it was commissioned on Dec 7th, 1942.

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    U.S.S. Bowfin -Submarine

    by Vikefan Updated Apr 4, 2011
    The U.S.S. Bowfin
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    This is the actual submarine, U.S.S Bowfin "The Avenger of Pearl Harbor", that you get to walk through. It is amazing that this sub had 80 men onboard and the efficiences that they developed to adapt to confined quarters. I bet there were a lot of head injuries due to bumping their heads against pipes, railings, low ceilings and knobs. It is a very easy walk through that also includes a museum on the shore. Added bonus, we saw a nice sized Jelly Fish next to the sub that was pointed out to us by park personel.

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    Kamehameha I statue

    by Nathalie_B Updated Jun 27, 2008

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    To me it would be just another statue, one of many, hadn’t it have such an interesting “biography” which I learned from a guard at the Punchbowl cemetery.
    “Did you know that this is not the original one, he said. This is a replica and the original one stands somewhere on the Big Island, at the birth place of the King. A high priest predicted that if the statue is not placed at the King’s birthplace it will never find peace. And he was right, because on its way from Paris, where it got its bronze color, the statue sank with the ship that was carrying it back to Hawaii.”
    A new statue was created and placed at its present location, in front of the Oahu’s Court House.
    Shortly, after the new statue’s inauguration, a sailor found the original one and sold it to King Kalakaua, who remembered the priest’s prediction and ordered to place it on the Big Island’s birth place of Kamehameha the 1st.

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    U.S.S. Arizona Memorial - Pearl Harbor

    by H-TownJourneyman Written Feb 10, 2006

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    If you are visiting O'ahu for the first time, no trip would be complete without paying your respects to our fallen heroes at the U.S.S. Arizona Memorial. This holds a special place in the hearts of all Americans, but people from all over the world get the same sobering feeling when they visit as well. The tour includes a movie about the attack of Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, which marked the United States' entry into World War II. Then a short ferry ride out to the memorial, where you can't help but feel emotions for what took place in this very spot over 60 years ago. Seeing the oil that still drifts to the surface of the water from the wreckage below gave me chills. A definate O'ahu must see.

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    National Memorial Cememtery of the Pacific

    by bryINpoland Updated Jul 23, 2005

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    THIS UNIQUE CEMETERY LOCATED IN PUNCHBOWL CRATER. ONCE AN ACTIVE VOLCANO ON OAHU, IS A MUST SEE.

    OPENED IN 1949, IT NOW IS HOME TO OVER 13,OOO SERVICE MEN WHO GAVE THEIR LIFES IN WWII. IN ALL OVER 44 THOUSAND SERVICE MEN HAVE BEAN BURIED IN THE CRATER.

    Visitation Hours
    The cemetery is open daily.
    September 30 thru March 1, from 8:00 a.m. until 5:30 p.m.
    March 2 thru September 29, from 8:00 a.m. until 6:30 p.m.
    On Memorial Day, the cemetery is open from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m

    ALSO VISIT THE OFFICAL HOMEPAGE PUNCHBOWL MEMORIAL

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    National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific / Views

    by bryINpoland Written Jul 23, 2005

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    This is looking towards downtown Honolulu from Punch Bowl lookout. Directly in the center of the picture you can see the State Capitol Building, and behind that is the Honolulu Harbor.

    The beautiful thing in the right side of the picture is Nadine.

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    National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific / Views

    by bryINpoland Written Jul 23, 2005

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    National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, is known to the locals as Punch Bowl. Here is a look towards Waikiki, and it's world famous landmark, Diamond Head Volcano. This picture was taken from Punch Bowls lookout.

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    National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific

    by BLewJay Written Jun 3, 2005

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    The cemetery covers 116 acres and is located in the Puowaina Crater (an extinct volcano known as the Punchbowl). Construction began in 1948 and the first remains were interred on January 4, 1949. The remains of military personnel who fought in battles such as Guadalcanal, China, Burma, Saipan, Guam, Okinawa, Iwo Jima, Korea as well as prisoners of war from camps in Japan are buried here. Two examples include the remains of Ernie Pyle (WW II correspondent) and Sgt. Henry Hansen (one of the original flag raisers on Iwo Jima.

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    USS Missouri

    by Robdaz Written Feb 19, 2005
    Mighty Mo

    When visiting Pearl Harbour and the USS Arizona Memorial , don't miss going to the
    Battleship Missouri Memorial right next door.

    This is one of the most the most famous battleships and on its deck the instrument of Surrender was signed by theEmpire of Japan and the USA to end the war.

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