Waikiki, Oahu

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  • Waikiki
    by cjg1
  • Waikiki
    by cjg1
  • Shopping until she drops (January 2014)
    Shopping until she drops (January 2014)
    by cjg1
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    Kalakaua Avenue

    by Gypsystravels Updated Mar 26, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Kalakaua Avenue is Waikiki's 2-mile long oceanfront street. The street is lined with hotels, restaurants, stores, shopping centers and is what I would call the center of Waikiki.

    The streets are always jammed packed with pedestrians either shopping or walking around looking for places to eat or drink.

    I enjoyed walking along Kalakaua Avenue, stopping in some of my favorite shops or grabbing a bite to eat or just some drinks.

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    Take a dip in the Super Pool

    by Gypsystravels Updated Jan 26, 2015

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    The weather in Oahu is almost always fantastic which is ideal for lounging around at the pool. We were staying here at the Hilton Hawaiian Village and decided to take advantage of the pool grounds during our visit.

    Although we normally leave the pool/beach lounging to one of the other islands (usually Maui), during this particular trip we decided to relax more and enjoy the rest. The pool area is quite nice with plenty of lounge chairs along the pool with or without shade.

    You aren't allowed in the pool area unless you are a guest of the hotel. Towels are provided free of charge.

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    Waikiki Beach Walk

    by cjg1 Updated Nov 26, 2014

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    The Waikiki Beach Walk is full of shopping, dining and several hotels such as the Outrigger and Trump hotel. Our last visit to Waikiki we spent some time here shopping and enjoying some of the art galleries.

    Shopping until she drops (January 2014)

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    Banyan Courtyard

    by cjg1 Updated Jul 24, 2014

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    The Banyan Courtyard at the Moana Surfrider was a favorite place of our to enjoy some drinks and entertainment when we stayed at this hotel. We have also enjoyed coming here as non-hotel guests and find the service just as friendly. In the courtyard theree are plenty of tables ;some with umbrellas sit sit and enjoy a cocktail. There are also some nice rocking chairs on the back lanai which are a favorite spot for my wife and I to sit. There is nightly musical entertainment and this is the perfect spot for viewing. The centerpiece of this area is the very old; very large Banyan Tree in the center. I am a lover of trees and this particular Banyan is quite a sight to behold. I am glad the hotel made it a focal point and didn't tear it down to increase property space.

    Huge Banyan Tree

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    Solomon Enos Murals

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 6, 2014

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    These lovely murals are located near the front entrance of the Sheraton Waikiki and are by Solomon Enos and Carl Pao. The other two murals are located at the entrance into the Royal Hawaiin Center are painted by Solomon Enos.

    The mural in the Sheraton Waikiki are called "The Arrival", this piece honors the first inhabitents of the Hawaiian islands, the birds, fish, and plants. They arrived via air streams, migration patterns, and ocean currents, the vessels that brought life to the middle of the Pacific. The Gathering, a continuation of the "The Arrival" art piece, "The Gathering" offers hope. The gathering is about ideas. It speaks to how and when we come together and gather our thoughts, experiences, and stories, we can move together to a better place for everyone. We are in this transformational process of gathering our resources, consuming ourselves, digesting ourselves, and deconstructin ourselves. Like seeds that are digested by a bird, they go through transformation. The seed germinates because of what it has been put through, a maze of intestines, a breaking down, a rebirth, back into organic shapes again. When we gather and are open to change, we find our way back to what we know is truth that include us all.

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    "Brothers In Valor" Memorial

    by Yaqui Updated May 24, 2014

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    Honoring the World War II Veterans of the 100th Infantry Battalion (Separate), the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, the Military Intelligence Service, and the 1399th Engineer Construction Battalion. The plaques are huge, so I only put limited amount of information on here.

    “Veterans who served in these units, which are deeply rooted to Hawaii, have rendered significant service to their nation, often with great sacrifice.” —Lt. General Robert L. Ord, III, Commander, U.S. Army, Pacific. November 1995.

    100th Infantry Battalion (Separate), “The Purple Heart Battalion.”
    The 100th Infantry Battalion, except for some officers, was the first combat unit in the history of the United States Army to be comprised of Hawaii-born Japanese Americans. The unit was made up of 1,432 men and officers, most of whom were pre-war draftees serving in the 298th and 299th Infantry Regiments, guarding Hawaii after the Pearl Harbor attack on December 7, 1941. On May 29, 1942, Japanese naval forces were approaching Midway. In anticipation of a subsequent Japanese attack on Hawaii, all Japanese-American soldiers in the 298th and 299th Infantry Regiments and others were placed into the Hawaii Provisional Infantry Battalion and then shipped off on June 5, 1942, to Camp McCoy, Wisconsin, for combat training. Redesignated as the 100th Infantry Battalion (Separate), the unit received extensive training at Camp McCoy and Camp Shelby, Mississippi, for the next 16 months. All the while, the Army remained in doubt as to whether the 100th should be sent into combat, and if so, where and with which unit. Finally, in September 1943, the 100th shipped out to Oran, Africa, attached to the 34th (“Red Bull”) Division, and landed at Salerno, Italy, on September 22, 1943. For the next nine months, the 100th fought in the Salerno-to-Rome campaign through the bitter winter against a tenacious enemy, most notably in the battle for Monte Cassino. Here, it suffered huge casualties and earned itself the title “The Purple Heart Battalion.” The 100th landed on the Anzio Beachhead in March 1944, took over and held defensive positions, and thereafter participated in the break out towards Rome and beyond.

    Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau
    2270 Kalakaua Avenue, Suite 801
Honolulu, HI 96815


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    Rainbow Mural - Rainbow Tower

    by Yaqui Written May 3, 2014

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    Located on the side of the Hilton Hawaiian Village Hotel, called the Rainbow Tower, in 1968 artist Millard Sheets adorned the side of the hotel with a mural made out of 8,046 hand made mosaics tiles that spans 286 feet high by 26 feet wide. It is listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the world's tallest mosaics, with one of each side, both stretching 31 floors.

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    Mohandas K. Gandhi State

    by Yaqui Written Apr 29, 2014

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    This lovely statue is in Kapiolani Park. It is towards the entrance and next to a massive Indian Banyan Tree. Kapiolani Park was named after the wife of King David Kalakaua. The Kapiolani Park Association was created in 1876 to manage the 108-acre park. The park was named "Queen Kapiolani Park" in 1877.

    Queen Kapiolani Park is located within a short walk to the Honolulu Zoo, Waikiki Beach, Diamond Head Crater and the Waikiki Aquarium.

    Statue presented to the city and county of Honolulu and the people of Hawai'i
    Gandhi Memorial Interantional Foundation
    Patron
    The Jhamandas Watumull Fund
    Dedicated October 27, 1990
    Frank F. Fasi
    Mayor of the City and County of Honolulu

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    Victoria Cleghorn 1875-1899

    by Yaqui Updated Apr 27, 2014

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    Victoria Kawekiu F Lunalilo Kalaninuiahilapalapu Ka’iulani Cleghorn
    1875-1899
    Born to Chiefess Miriam Kapili Likelike (sister to King Kalakaua and Queen Lili’uokalani) and Governor Archibald Scott Cleghorn. She was the only child born to the last ruling dynasty of the Hawaiian Kingdom.

    Princess Ka’iulani and her parents lived in Waikiki and created a tropical garden estate, in the area around this staue, known as Ainahau~Land of the Hau Tree. Ka’iulani’s favorite flower was the Chinese Jasmine, which grew wild in the gardens and was given the Hawaiian name – pikake – after the beloved pet peacocks that roamed freely around the estate.
    Princess Ka’iulani spent many years away from Hawai’i, being schooled as the heir to the Hawaiian throne. After the overthrow of the monarchy, Ka’iulani returned to Hawai’i and fought for the return of the throne to her Aunt Queen Lili’uokalani.
    After riding her horse in a rainstorm, Ka’iulani took ill and never fully recovered. She died on March 6, 1899, at the age of 23 and was buried at Mauna Ala, the Royal Mausoleum in Nu’uanu.

    To celebrate the life of Princess Ka’iulani, lovingly referred to by her people as the “Princess of the Peacocks”. Outrigger Hotels & Resorts, on behalf of the Kelley Family commissioned the statue of her as part of their commitment to restoring Waikiki’s history, and honoring Hawai’i’s favorite princess.

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    Surfer on a Wave!

    by Yaqui Written Apr 27, 2014

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    This lovely sculpture is next to a Waikiki Historical Trail marker. Honolulu has so many, so when you are exploring, look around because you will probably find one. Not far from this sculpture is a huge Indian Banyan Tree.

    The plaque read:
    Surfer on a Wave
    Robert Pashby
    Sculptor
    Jen 2003
    Commission on Culture and the Arts
    City and Country of Honolulu
    Jeremy Harris, Mayor

    Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau
    2270 Kalakaua Avenue, Suite 801
Honolulu, HI 96815

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    Makua and Kila Sculpture

    by Yaqui Written Apr 27, 2014

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    Honolulu is so many wonderful sculptures that capture the history and story of its people. Based on a children's story by Fred Van Dyke honoring Hawaiian values of Love & Respect for Ohana (Family) and the Ocean.

    Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau
    2270 Kalakaua Avenue, Suite 801
Honolulu, HI 96815


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    Duke Paoa Kahanamoku 1890-1968

    by Yaqui Updated Apr 27, 2014

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    Raised in Waikiki, Duke was a full blooded Hawaiian, who symbolized Hawai'i to millions of people. He developed into an Olympic Champion and the world's fastest swimmer. Between 1912 and 1932 he won three gold medals, two silver and a bronze in four Olympics. He is know as the "Father of Interantional Surfing."

    Duke introduced surfing to the Eastern seaboard of American, Europe and Austrailia. He became a hero when he saved eight lives from a capsized launch at Corona del Mar, California in 1925 using his surfboard. A movie actor from 1925 - 1933 he was elected Sheriff of Honolulu for thirteen consecutive terms from 1934 - 1960. He has been recognized as Hawai'i's Ambassador of Aloha since 1912.

    He has honored his name, he has honored his race, he has honored his state, he has honored us all.

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    Hula Lessons

    by Yaqui Written Apr 25, 2014

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    The have many wonderful programs and events held at the Royal Hawaiin Center. The have hula lessons located at the Royal Grove section. Hula is the art of Hawaiian dance. It expresses all that we hear, see, smell, taste, touch and feel. Hula is life. The late kumu hula - dance master - Maiki Aiu Lake's philosophy expresses the depths of this Hawaiian art form. Puake'ala Mann, a kumu hula graduate of Hälau Hula o Maiki, shares basic hand gestures, footwork and body movements that accentuate mele - chant or song lyrics.

    1 hour, twice weekly

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    Turtle Sculptures

    by Yaqui Written Apr 25, 2014

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    This lovely sculpture is located at the entrance into the Sheraton Waikik Hotel. I know most folks probably don't even pay attention to these, but I so enjoy and appreciate works of arts. These are fantastic!

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    Ceremonial Call Sand sculpture

    by Yaqui Written Apr 25, 2014

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    This wonderful sand sculpture is located right near the computer center of Sheraton Waikiki.

    The Hawaiian ceremonial practice of blowing the conch shell is often used to signal the opening of ceremony, such as at a wedding or a luau. In the olden days, it was used to notify the Hawaiian people that our Ali'i (chief) has arrived and our Makahiki season and other notable events have begun. The conch shell can be heard from miles and miles across the land and/or ocean.

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