Neighborhoods-other, Chicago

50 Reviews

Know about this? Rate It!

hide
  • Photography Group Gathers
    Photography Group Gathers
    by riorich55
  • Part of the Graffiti Wall
    Part of the Graffiti Wall
    by riorich55
  • Blue Line Train
    Blue Line Train
    by riorich55
  • mam3206's Profile Photo

    Ukrainian Village

    by mam3206 Written Jul 22, 2007

    First, let me say that other than a few churches, there is very little Ukrainian left in this neighborhood. It's mostly Mexican immigrants and hipsters. The main business district runs along Chicago Avenue between Ashland (1600 west) and Western (2400 west). The blue line (O'Hare branch) stops at the intersection of Chicago (800 north), Ogden (approx 1200 west) and Milwaukee. Depending on how much of a walker you are, you can walk west on Chicago or take the Chicago Avenue bus. Flo is a great restaurant at 1434 W Chicago. Rotofugi is a "designer toy store" at 1953 W Chicago, and Permanent Records buys, sells, and trades used records at 1914 W Chicago. I love to walk the residential streets of Ukrainian Village, especially the quadrant bounded by Chicago (800 north), Damen (2000 west), Leavitt (2200 west), and Division (1200 north). I usually combine this walk with a visit to Wicker Park, the neighborhood immediately north of Ukrainian Village. (see Wicker Park tip)

    Was this review helpful?

  • mam3206's Profile Photo

    Jackson Boulevard

    by mam3206 Written Jul 22, 2007

    This block of Jackson is about 2 miles west of the Loop. It can be a nice addition to a visit to Little Italy. Walk north on Loomis from Little Italy, cross over the expressway and L tracks, and head west on Jackson. (If you're coming from downtown, take the blue line to Racine, exit the station at Loomis. Head north on Loomis, west on Jackson.) Once you pass Laflin, you'll enter one of my favorite blocks in Chicago. Many lifelong Chicagoans don't even know it exists. It's a nearly perfectly preserved street from the late 19th century. Twice a year or so, the Chicago Architecture Foundation does a tour of this street that is worth taking if you can. (Go to www.architecture.org and search for "Jackson Boulevard" tour.) When you get to Ashland, take a right and go north two blocks to Bombon Cafe at 38 S Ashland. This place is a real local gem. Amazing food, great staff, and a wonderful atmosphere. And you just might be the only tourist there!

    Was this review helpful?

  • mam3206's Profile Photo

    Little Italy

    by mam3206 Written Jul 22, 2007

    Take the blue line toward Forest Park and get off at Racine (1200 west). Walk south toward Harrison. The area where I like to walk runs from Harrison (600 south) to Taylor (1000 south), and from Morgan (1000 west) to Ashland (1600 west). Some of my favorite streets include the 1200-1400 blocks of Lexington (about 800 south). The north side of Lexington is lined with 19th century row houses, and Arrigo Park (or Peanut Park as the locals call it) is on the south side. I also love Bishop Street (around 1450 west) between Polk and Taylor. Taylor Street is the business district, and has many Italian restaurants. If you want restaurant recommendations, I encourage you to check out the Chicago Reader's restaurant rater (www.chicagoreader.com, then click on "restaurants"). It's very user friendly, allowing you to enter neighborhood, cuisine, and price range, among other criteria. I do, however, have two recommendations. If you're there at breakfast time, I recommend Sweet Maple, at 1339 W. Taylor. Be prepared to go early or wait in line. The atmosphere is homey and the food is great. If you're in the neighborhood on a hot summer day, or, better yet, a hot summer evening, nothing beats standing in a line that spills onto the street with 20 or more sweaty Chicagoans at Mario's Italian Lemonade stand (1068 W Taylor). It's a beautiful thing.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Neighborhoods-South Loop

    by Dabs Updated May 20, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    River City
    1 more image

    The South Loop is one of the fastest growing neighborhoods in Chicago with new high rises and construction cranes dotting the sky, a few years ago there really wouldn't have been much down here to draw visitors to this area but there are now several very good restaurants including the Bongo Room's location on Wabash, Yolk, Gioco, Opera, Chicago Firehouse and Custom House.

    The borders are roughly between Congress Parkway on the north and Roosevelt Road on the south (although a more generous definition is as far south as 18th Street or Cermak) between Grant Park and the Chicago River which flows north/south at this point. There's a small section inside this area which is known as Printer's Row around Clark and Dearborn.

    One of the first developments in this area back in the 1980s was River City, 800 S. Wells, designed by Bertrand Goldberg who also designed Marina City, shaped in the form of an "S". Originally it was supposed to be one of several buildings that would be interconnected in the form of a snake but the area didn't take off, only 1 of the planned buildings was erected and the building sat isolated for many years. I think it looks a lot like Chicago's public housing style that was used for low income residents or maybe something from a Batman movie.

    Although technically not in the South Loop, you can get a good view of the Art Deco old main Post Office from nearby River City, it has been vacant since 1996, plans are to turn it into condos, office space and parking.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Neighborhoods-Printers Row

    by Dabs Updated May 20, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Franklin Company Building
    2 more images

    Printer's Row is located south of Congress Parkway, a section of what is becoming known as the South Loop, an area of Chicago that most visitors to Chicago don't wander into. But if you find yourself at the Harold Washington Library, Printer's Row is just south of the library and a walk down Dearborn Street to Dearborn Station will showcase some of the old printers buildings including the Franklin Company building and Donohue Building in the attached photos.

    After the Chicago Fire leveled the city in 1871, this section of Chicago, then known as the Custom House Levee District, became the most notorious crime/vice section in Chicago, home to Chicago’s red light district.

    By the early 1900s, the once crime ridden district was deserted until the printing companies moved in, giving the area the current name of Printer's Row. I believe all of the printing companies are now closed, the buildings converted into condominiums. Dearborn Station, once a recruiting site for the area's prostitutes, is no longer an active station, it now houses a small shopping center.

    There are a couple of places to grab a bite to eat that I can recommend on Dearborn, Edwardo's Pizza or Hackney's, a branch of the popular north shore suburban chain, also Orange on Harrison for breakfast/brunch. I haven't eaten at the Custom House but it's received good reviews. There's one hotel that I know of in Printer's Row, Hotel Blake (formerly Hyatt-Printer's Row), at 500 S. Dearborn in the former Morton Salt headquarters.

    In the summer there is the popular Printer's Row Book Fair

    If you want to read a little bit more about the history of the area, this is a nice write up
    Printer's Row history

    Was this review helpful?

  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Neighborhoods-Old Edgebrook Historical District

    by Dabs Written May 19, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Reconstructed home to the original plans
    4 more images

    One of the tours offered on 2007's Great Places and Spaces was a tour of the Old Edgebrook Historic District, a neighborhood that I had never heard of, in fact I thought I was touring Edgewater until my husband pointed out that it was Edgebrook, good thing as they are on opposite sides of the city!

    We started at the Edgebrook Golf Course parking lot at 6100 N. Central and headed north through the trees to a small neighborhood filled with interesting architecture from as early as 1894. Some of the houses are clearly newer than that, mostly because the vacant lots were sold and people filled in with current architectural styles. But you'll see good examples of Victorian, Queen Anne, Colonial Revival and at least one Craftsman style bungalow.

    Edgebrook was part of the 1,600 acres given to by the US government to Chief Sauganash, also known as Billy Caldwell, who was half-Potawatomi Indian, half-Irish. He eventually sold the land, some of it became private homes, much of it is now forest preserve or a golf course. If you go east on Caldwell (which becomes Peterson), you will run into the community named Sauganash after him.

    To get here take the Caldwell exit (41A) from highway 94, turn left on Central and look for the golf course sign on the right.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Neighborhoods-Lincoln Square

    by Dabs Updated Apr 19, 2007

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Chicago's only maypole
    4 more images

    The Lincoln Square neighborhood is bordered by Foster Avenue (north) to Montrose Avenue (south), Damen Avenue (east) to the Chicago River (west). The heart of Lincoln Square is on Lincoln Avenue from Lawrence on the north to Montrose on the south. You can get here by driving, there is metered street and lot parking, or by taking the CTA (el) brown line.

    Lincoln Avenue is filled with restaurants ranging from the popular Chicago Brauhaus for German, to Turkish, Thai and Italian.

    There are also many shops lining the street, including several delis selling German food/ sausages and gift stores. Some places you'll want to stop in, even if just for a look include Merz Apothecary at 4716 N. Lincoln and Quake Collectibles at 4628 N. Lincoln. Sadly, one of the last remnants of Lincoln Square German history, Delicatessen Meyer, closed in April 2007 after 53 years.

    The last project of architect Louis Sullivan, the Krause Music store, is located at 4611 N. Lincoln Avenue. It now houses the Museum of Decorative Arts.

    You might also want to stop by the Old Town School of Folk Music at 4544 N. Lincoln to see the WPA mural that can be found on the 2nd floor in an art deco building that used to be a branch of the Chicago Public Library, look for the detail on the exterior of the building. Or you might even catch a performance here.

    Several big festivals take place in the Lincoln Square neighborhood, there's a Mayfest that's held in June and an Oktoberfest that's held in September. Is there a different calendar in Germany????? LOL Be sure to find the Chicago's only maypole on Lincoln Avenue.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Neighborhoods-Old Town

    by Dabs Updated Feb 6, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    St. Michael's
    2 more images

    Old Town, located between Division St. (south) and Eugenie St. (north), between Halsted (west) and Clark St. (east), is a pleasant neighborhood to visit, full of shops, restaurants and entertainment. Old Town is sandwiched in between the Gold Coast to the south, Lincoln Park to the north. The area to the west is still a little rough although the housing project known as Cabrini Green is all but gone now. To the east is Lake Michigan.

    Like many of Chicago's neighborhoods it has changed many times over the years. In the 1800s, the area was filled with German farmers who gave the area the nickname the "Cabbage Patch". In the 1960s, the area became a sort of bohemian place to live, rents were cheap and artists and performers gravitated here including many of the talented Second City performers like Bill Murray, John Belushi and John Candy. After a period where the neighborhood turned a little seedy, it has again changed into a higher priced neighborhood where young professionals live.

    Places to eat: Twin Anchors for ribs, Bistro Margot for French bistro fare, Adobo Grill for upscale Mexican, Salpicon also upscale Mexican

    Entertainment/things to see: Second City comedy club, Zanies comedy club, visit St. Michael's church, Old Town Art Fair June 11-12, 2005, St. Michael Festival June 10-12, 2005, Second City walking tour

    Was this review helpful?

  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Neighborhoods-Gold Coast

    by Dabs Updated Feb 6, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Patterson-McCormick House-20 E. Burton
    4 more images

    The appropriately named Gold Coast is Chicago's wealthiest neighborhood, roughly from Oak Street (or Chicago Avenue depending on who you believe) to North Avenue, between Lake Michigan and LaSalle. If you take a walk through the area you will understand why, tree lined streets filled with million dollar mansions, some so large that they have been split into multiple condos.

    This is one of the closest neighborhoods to the tourist area around the Magnificent Mile, you can easily walk here from any of the Michigan Avenue hotels.

    I took two different tours of the area during Chicago's 2005 and 2006 Great Places & Spaces weekend. In 2005, we started at Chicago & Dearborn and headed north, turning right on Goethe (pronounced Gerta if you are not familiar with the German philosopher) and left on Astor. Among the impressive things I saw along the way were:

    The Newberry Library-Walton & Dearborn

    James Charnley House-1365 N. Astor St., designed by Adler & Sullivan in conjunction with Frank Lloyd Wright, free tours on Wednesday at noon, Saturday tours are $10 and include the Madlener House and an exterior tour

    Elinor Patterson-Cyrus McCormick House-20 E. Burton/1500 N. Astor, the largest mansion in the area, currently divided into condos which would still be pretty nice sized

    Archbishop's Residence-1555 N. State Parkway

    In 2006, we started at Lake Shore Drive and Bellevue at the Lathrop House, 120 E. Bellevue, and saw many of the same houses along the way, one of the special things we saw on this trip was the house at 1310 N. Astor Street where John Root lived when he contracted pnemonia at age 41 and died, the owner happened to be there and let the whole group traipse through the house which was under renovation. Cool! If you are not familiar with the name, Root was an associate of Daniel Burnham and at the time of his death was collaborating with Burnham on the architecture for the 1893 Columbian Exposition.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Jackson Boulevard Historic District

    by Dabs Updated Jun 18, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ferguson House
    4 more images

    As part of the 2006 Great Places and Spaces weekend, we took a tour of the Jackson Boulevard Historic District with the Chicago Architecture Foundation who runs this tour several times a year, each time allowing a visit to a different interior of one of the mansions. We got to visit one that the owners had painstakingly renovated.

    The Historic District is really only a 2 block area on Jackson Boulevard and Adams Street between Ashland and Laflin (1500 West and 300 South), almost all that is left of the once fashionable west side . Many of the mansions once lining these grand old boulevards have been razed over the years, the docent said he didn't really know how this one particular block on Jackson Boulevard remained more or less intact. The ones that do remain were built between roughly 1871 and 1900 in the popular styles of that time-Italianate, Queen Anne, 2nd Empire and Richardsonian Romanesque.

    A few interesting things we learned on the tour was that at one time many of the mansions had been painted battleship gray (the paint was government issued and cheap), all of them now restored to their original brick color, the ones that were sand blasted didn't fare as well as the others.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Neighborhoods-Wicker Park

    by Dabs Updated Jun 11, 2006

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hoyne Avenue Mansion
    4 more images

    I'm not exactly sure when Wicker Park, a neighborhood on the west side of downtown Chicago, started turning around, but you probably wouldn't have seen many recommendations to go visit Wicker Park 10 years ago. A recent boost to the area was when MTV's Real World was filmed there in 2002. Wicker Park is named for the public park that Charles Wicker, a developer/politician, and his brother Joel, donated to the city in 1870.

    The old mansions in the neighborhood come from the time when the original residents, German beer barons, lived here in the 1860s. By the late 1800s, the area became inhabited by the Poles, followed by Latino immigrants in the 1960s. The area fell into decline but eventually some people looking for the next hot real estate market took a chance and bought some of the beautiful neglected mansions in Wicker Park and today it is a diverse neighborhood with lots of young people and artists, funky restaurants and stores. Many of the old mansions survived and are intermixed with new development.

    Wicker Park has convenient transportation links to downtown, take the blue line el to Damen, and if you'd prefer to stay in a neighborhood rather than the downtown tourist area, there are at least two B&Bs in Wicker Park Wicker Park Inn and House of Two Urns.

    Trendy/funky restaurants abound in Wicker Park, the Bongo Room is a great casual spot to have a decadent breakfast/brunch. Spring, housed in a cool building that used to be the North Avenue bath house, is a more upscale place to have dinner. Santullo's is one of the few places in Chicago where you can get a slice of New York style pizza. For more suggestions, check out Center Stage

    Was this review helpful?

  • Leniwy's Profile Photo

    'Labor' Pains of the Steel Industry

    by Leniwy Updated Dec 9, 2005

    'Southeast' Chicago is a place of great historical importance to the American 'Steelworking' industry (it is still the world's greatest steel-producing region today - extending through Northwest Indiana, with iron ore brought down the Great Lakes from Minnesota). Many proud and dedicated people contributed to the growth of the Steel Industry, a process that included conflicts and struggles which helped give birth to the American Labor Union movement.

    In August, 2003, a community theater group presented a play - entitled "Unfriendly Fire" - to commemorate the "1937 Memorial Day Massacre." The cast included several former steelworkers, and it premiered in what was once the meeting hall of the United Steel Workers' Local 1033 (practically across the street from the Republic Steel Works entrance, where the actual historical event took place):
    "The Zone" Community Center
    (Formerly USWA Local 1033 Memorial Hall)
    11731 S. Avenue 'O'
    Chicago, Illinois 60617

    Website link (below) is to:
    "Southeast Chicago Historical Society"

    Related to:
    • Study Abroad
    • Theater Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Neighborhoods-Chinatown

    by Dabs Updated Jul 17, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Chinatown
    2 more images

    Chicago's Chinatown is not as large as the ones in San Francisco, New York or Los Angeles but if you are in Chicago for longer than a few days, you might give some thought to heading down here for a little shopping or some dim sum. Chinatown also has a few remnants of when the area was populated by Italians, Bertucci's which our guide said was a terrific Italian restaurant and a Catholic church.

    We recently took a guided tour through Chinatown with a local and it was an interesting look into one of Chicago's neighborhoods. He told us that Chicago's Chinatown was originally further northeast and moved to it's present location in 1913. Our guide gave us a historical look at the Chinese in the US, how they came to Chicago and how the area evolved over the years.

    The weekend is the best time to visit, on the weekdays Chinatown is pretty empty. We usually make the journey to Chinatown on Sunday afternoon and head to Won Kow, our favorite place for dim sum. Phonenix, 2131 S. Archer, is the dim sum place that comes most highly recommended but expect a wait on a Sunday afternoon.

    Occasionally we also stop for dinner, the last time we visited Moon Palace on Cermak and the food was good.

    After filling up on the tasty pot stickers, bbq pork buns and dumplings, we take a stroll on Wentworth, stopping by the Chinese gift shops, a bakery to take home some egg tarts and a grocery to get whatever catches our fancy.

    Other things to check out in Chinatown is the newly opened Chinese-American Museum of Chicago at 238 W. 23rd and the On Leong Tong Building and Chinatown Gate at Wentworth & Cermak.

    Chinatown is very easy to reach from downtown Chicago, the red line el (subway) stops at Cermak-Chinatown, a block or two away from the shops and restaurants. It's a very quick trip, no more than 10-15 minutes by el from downtown. From the el station, head towards the Chinatown Gate and Three Happiness Restaurant which is the start of Chinatown.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yorick12's Profile Photo

    Check out Belmont

    by Yorick12 Written Jun 5, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The area surrounding Wrigley Field is my favorite part of town. The heart of this area is at W. Belmont Avenue and N. Clark Street. It's filled with vintage clothing stores, record shops (which still sell records!), tattoo parlors, coffee shops, pubs and the like. It's awesome. From downtown take the L to Belmont Ave.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • deecat's Profile Photo

    Lincoln Square's Architectural Gem

    by deecat Updated Feb 19, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Museum of Decorative Arts Building

    "I wish I could go to America if only to see that Chicago!"
    Otto Von Bismarck, German Chancellor, 1870

    I love Lincoln Square, and it's not just because my daughter lives in that area! I love the old wood-frame Victorians, the Chicago bungalows, the greystone apartment buildings, and the quaint shops of the area. But, of all the beautiful places in Lincoln Square, the one that is the most beautiful example of Chicago architecture is The Museum oof Decorative Arts Building, the last project of the famous Louis Sullivan. Louis Sullivan is most famous for such Chicago landmarks as the Auditorium Theatre, the Carson Pirie Scott building on State Street, and the old Chicago Stock Exchange.
    William P. Krause wanted to build a music store in about 1920, and with the help of Sullivan, Krause's builder created this ornate little place for a music store with Krause's apartment above it. The facade of this building is hard to miss. It has built-in lights as well as white & black & grey tiles. There is also an ornamental letter K at the top of the facade (which you can see in the photo) that represents William Krause.
    Unfortunately, the music shop was only in business for about seven years. After the music store, there was a funeral home there for several years, and today, it is the home of the Museum of Decorative Arts which boasts a collection of decorative arts & objects which date from 1870 until 1930. It's more than just a museum; there are items available for sale from several eras: Victorian, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, & Arts & Crafts movements.
    When in Lincoln Square, be sure to drop in for a "look-see" and maybe a purchase!

    It's located on North Lincoln Avenue kind of across from the Davis Theatre.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Chicago

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

92 travelers online now

Comments

View all Chicago hotels