Golconda Travel Guide

  • Golconda
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Golconda Things to Do

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    by butterflykizzez04 Written Jun 1, 2014

    This Review is of the History of the church and the building itself. I never attended any services in the church.

    History notes from the website:
    History of the Presbyterian Church in the State of Illinois
    (Pope County Excerpt)
    A. T. Norton. St. Louis: W. S. Bryan, 1879
    Transcribed by ©K. Torp

    GOLCONDA Church, Pope county, was organized Oct. 24, 1819, by Rev. Nathan B. Derrow, with sixteen members. Here is a verbatim copy of the original record....

    GOLCONDA, ILL., Oct. 23, 1819.

    "This day a number of persons convened at the Court-house in Golconda, for examination preparatory to the planting of a church in this place. Sixteen persons, whose names are hereafter recorded, gave in their names for members in a Presbyterian Church in this place, and after inquiry respecting their belief and practice, it was resolved to be planted in a church state tomorrow. Accordingly, on Lord's day, the 24th of this month, after a discourse from Rom. 4th chapter, the church was planted by the persons aforesaid making the following Confession and Covenant. [omitted.] They are, therefore, hereby declared a regular church of Jesus Christ, and as such recommended to the fellowship of sister churches and to the attention of the ambassadors of Jesus.
    By me,
    N'n. B. DERROW, V. D. M.,
    "Missionary for Connecticut."

    NAMES: James E. Willis, Eliza Willis, Joshua Scott, Jane Scott, David B. Glass, Francis Glass, Agnes Glass, George Hodge, John Hanna, Margaret Hanna, George H. Hanna, William P. Hanna, Jane Hanna, James H. Hanna, Benjamin Spilman, Nancy R. Spilman.

    ELDERS : James E. Willis was the first. The Elders since appointed are these:

    John Hanna, Benjamin Spilman and Joshua Scott, March 18, 1820;
    George Hodge and William Sim, Nov. 26, 1822;
    Francis Glass and Joseph Glass, Nov. 27, 1824;
    William A. Glass and John C. Hanna, June 11, 1844;
    Samuel D. Hemphill and J. E. Y. Hanna, Oct. 21, 1860;
    John V. Schuhard, M. D., Jan. 11, 1868;
    William P. Sloan, Feb. 6, 1869;
    W. S. Hodge, Feb. 12, 1871.

    The five last named are the present (1879) Elders.

    Of their Ministers.
    Nathan B. Derrow did not visit the church after its organization. Robert A. Lapsley gave them some ministerial services. B. F. Spilman was their next minister. I think it very certain he preached his first sermon here after his licensure, probably on the second Sabbath of December, 1823. It is quite clear that he made his home at Golconda from that time until the beginning of 1832. He seems indeed to have given that church all the ministerial labor it enjoyed from December, 1823, to Nov., 1845. A portion of the time his appointments with them were regular. More often occasional, and the occasions far between.

    To him succeeded William A. Smith, in the latter part of 1845.

    John P. Riddle gave them some supply from November, 1852, to November, 1854.

    Wm. R. Sim was their minister from February, 1861, till about the time of his death, which took place July 7, 1864. He died and was buried at Golconda.

    R. Lewis McCune gave them some supply from November, 1864, to March, 1865.

    Solomon Cook was with them from May 26, 1867, to the spring of 1872. The last six months of this time he was pastor.

    A. A. Mathes supplied their pulpit for two years from March 25, 1873.

    In March, 1877, J. M. Green, of Shawneetown, held a meeting with the Golconda Church, at which thirty-two persons were received on profession. About fifteen of these are still reliable members.

    Sherman M. Burton took charge of the church as pastor Feb. 26, 1877, and still continues (1879). This congregation has from the beginning had two places of worship--one in the village of Golconda, the other in the country, on the Vienna road. In town the place of meeting was the court-house, or school-house, or in a building called the Union Church, until, in 1869, they entered their own house, a fine structure of brick, erected at a cost of $8,000.

    In the country, the place of meeting was at the house of Francis Glass--two and a half miles west of Golconda--until about the year 1832. Next at the house of David B. Glass--four miles west of Golconda--until about 1840, when a building was erected called Bethel Church. It was a frame building--never entirely finished--and was used until about 1858. It was then sold and the proceeds put into a building called "Bethany" Church, the title to which was with the Cumberlands. The Presbyterians assisted largely in its erection and occupied it jointly with them until 1877.

    The next summer our people erected for themselves a neat frame house, called "Prospect" Church, which was dedicated September 1, 1878. It is located at the middle of N. W. quarter Sec. 33, T. 13, S. R. 6 E, of third Principal Meridian.
    Next time I am there, I am going inside the building.

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    by butterflykizzez04 Written Jun 1, 2014

    Tony and I was visiting this Historical little River town in Illinois. The town is nestled along the river and is lovely. There are many old homes and some of them need to be restored.

    There is a nice river road that you can drive along and the small main street town is lovely. The Pope County Courthouse is a large lovely building from 1816.
    We parked and walked around the grounds and I took some great photos.

    Brief history of the building:
    Pope county was established January 10, 1816 from portions of Gallatin and Johnson Counties. The county seat was originally Sarahsville which was renamed Golconda in 1817 and has continued in Golconda since.

    The brick courthouse was built 1872-1873 and little has changed on its exterior appearance since its construction.

    They were getting ready for an annual festival that weekend on the grounds of the courthouse lawn. I really enjoyed this small historical town. I can't wait to go back again.

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    by butterflykizzez04 Written Jun 1, 2014

    Friday May 16, 2014, Tony and I was visiting this lovely little historical river town in Illinois.
    It reminded me so much of little towns along the Ohio River in Ohio and West Virginia

    The house was closed the day we were here, so I was able to take some photos and then look them up on the internet to find out the history.
    Below the History of the home and the connection to the Trail of Tears

    Buel House, according to local tradition, was a significant site on the Cherokee Trail of Tears. The family of tanner Alexander Buel (?-1894) was said to have fed pumpkin to hungry Cherokee Indians being driven west by the federal government in 1838. The story is probably not true, however, since records indicate that the house was built in 1840. Still, it is a historically significant structure, having been continuously occupied by generations of one family for 146 years. There are indications that over the years Cherokee stopped at Golconda to trade while journeying to visit their former homes in Georgia. The Buel House, along with much of Golconda, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976, as part of the Golconda Historic District.

    Situated at the base of the Ohio River bluffs, the two-story rectangular square-log structure has one-story additions on the east and north sides of the original building. Also on the site is a restored and furnished log cabin used for interpretive programs by the Pope County Historical Society. A paved lot provides parking facilities.

    The Pope County Historical Society provides maintenance services for the site and volunteers for guided tours.

    I would like to go here and check it out and tour the home. It is located down near the Rivers edge on Water Street.

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Golconda Restaurants

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    by butterflykizzez04 Written May 31, 2014

    Sweetwater Saloon on Main Street

    Friday, May 16, 2014.. Tony and I went to Illinois for a day trip and once we went to Cave in Rock State Park , we traveled to Dixon Spring State Park. We ended up in Golconda, a sweet little town near the river. They were getting ready for some type of celebration. We drove around the small town and I took some photos. We saw some of the historical sites and then we found this bar on Main Street, called Sweetwater Saloon.

    Here we went in and we ordered a drink, Tony a beer and myself a sweet tea. Then we decided to get a few bar appetizers to tide us over so we ordered a 6 piece Hot Wings and some deep fried mushrooms and hot popper basket to share..

    The place inside is really clean and large. A lot of Coors Beer signs everywhere, and a few pool tables, large dance floor and band area. Big bar in the center and plenty of tables, both regular and high top. The bartender was also our waitress and she was very friendly.

    The food was typical bar fare nothing to brag about. The prices were very reasonable. We had a nice time and visit with the bartender. The place was not all that busy.
    I would recommend this place if you are wanting a cold libation but food, well it's bar food, everything is deep fried and greasy...what do you expect...?

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