Nauvoo Off The Beaten Path

  • 1846 home for Icarian Living Museum
    1846 home for Icarian Living Museum
    by mtncorg
  • German inscription high atop Coolidge House
    German inscription high atop Coolidge...
    by mtncorg
  • Baxter's Winery on Parley Street in Nauvoo
    Baxter's Winery on Parley Street in...
    by mtncorg

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Nauvoo

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    BLUE CHEESE FACTORY

    by mtncorg Written Oct 4, 2004

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    LDS temple and Catholic church and the cheese bldg

    Just north of the temple are the buildings of the former Nauvoo Blue Cheese factory. The industry began in 1937 utilizing old limestone wine cellars for curing the cheese. At the factory’s peak, it was the third largest producer of blue cheese in the US. In 2003, the mega food company Con-Agra – third largest food retailer in the World – bought Nauvoo Blue Cheese only to shut them down, a serious blow to a small rural Illinois town.

    For more on ConAgra's take on closing brands that they buy up: http://www.conagrafoods.com/investors/investor_release.jsp?ID=20031124_qa&H=November%2024,%202003%20Q%26A for more on closing 'brands'

    Good news is a new blue cheese maker is scheduled to begin serving up cheese in 2005.

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    METHODIST CHURCH

    by mtncorg Written Oct 4, 2004

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    1846 Methodist Church in Nauvoo

    Built in 1846, this was the church that Emma Smith went to following the Mormon exodus left her behind. Emma never did accept her husband’s revelations concerning polygamy nor did she accept Brigham Young as the successor to her husband. She was later remarried to Thomas Bidamon in this church.

    United Methodist, PO Box 291, Nauvoo IL 62354

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    GERMAN LUTHERAN CHURCH

    by mtncorg Written Oct 4, 2004

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    German Lutheran Church in Nauvoo

    Not all of the incoming German immigrants were Catholic. This Lutheran Church was built to take care of those Protestants needing taking care of. The church continues to serve those needs today.

    Christ Lutheran Church, PO Box 427, Nauvoo IL 62354

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    CATHOLIC CHURCH

    by mtncorg Written Oct 4, 2004

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    Saints Peter and Paul Cathloic Church in Nauvoo

    The Catholic Church has a long history in Nauvoo with the first priest coming to the area in 1835. Large numbers of Germans came here following the departure of most of the Mormons. The first church was built in 1848. This church, Saints Peter and Paul, dates to 1873. The following year, the Benedictine St Mary’s Academy for Girls began a long run, closing in 1997. The Academy was bought by the LDS Church and was partly raxed and partly incorporated into the new Joseph Smith Academy. Much of Nauvoo’s population remains Catholic today.

    Saints Peter and Paul Catholic Church, PO Box 147, Nauvoo IL 62354

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    BAXTER’S VINEYARDS

    by mtncorg Written Oct 4, 2004

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    Baxter's Winery on Parley Street in Nauvoo

    This is home to Illinois’ oldest winery, dating back to 1857. Emile Baxter originally came to Illinois to join with the Icarian commune. He started the winery after the commune disbanded. His family still operates the winery – they were the first winery to get a license from the State following the repeal of Prohibition in 1936. There is free wine-tasting and a self-guided tour of the winery available. Also a large gift shop is on the premises.

    2010 Parley St. Nauvoo, IL, 62354

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    COOLIDGE HOUSE

    by mtncorg Written Oct 4, 2004

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    German inscription high atop Coolidge House

    This Mormon house in lower Nauvoo was originally built for the Coolidge family. After the 1846 exodus, a German immigrant family occupied the house. Their inscriptions, on the side of the house can still be read

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    ICARIAN LIVING HISTORY MUSEUM

    by mtncorg Written Oct 4, 2004

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    1846 home for Icarian Living Museum

    In 1849, 230 Frenchmen led by Etienne Cabet, a would-be socio-political reformer, arrived in Nauvoo to set up a social commune based upon the ideas written in a book by Cabet, ‘Voyage to Icaria’. They bought the old Temple Square and several other Mormon buildings along with over 600 acres of outlying farmland in which to try out their ideas. With stones from the destroyed temple, a two-story assembly hall and a communal dining hall were built. Four wooden frame apartment buildings were built along with workshops, warehouses and gardens. Cabet was annually elected president and at the commune’s peak, there were 469 people living in Icaria. Bickering within the community – especially after Cabet’s Forty-Eight Articles for Living were imposed – along with financial troubles and Cabet’s absence in France – to clear his name of certain charges – combined to break up the Colony in 1856. Some 179 followed Cabet downriver to St Louis – where he died at year’s end. Others melted into the Nauvoo economy or moved on to develop another Icaria-styled commune in Corning, Iowa.

    The last Icarian building – the Assembly Hall – which was on the SW corner of Temple Square – was torn down in 1972, but in this 1846 house on the SE edge of town, a collection of material dealing with the Icarian period has been amassed. The museum is open by appointment.

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    TEMPLE QUARRY

    by mtncorg Written Oct 4, 2004

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    Limestone quarry from which material for temple

    Down near a large grain elevator along the Mississippi River is the site for the limestone quarry for the original 1840’s temple. From here the limestone blocks were moved up the hill to the temple site. Since 1913, the river has been dammed several miles downstream at Keokuk. The river has flooded into the lower reaches of the quarry as a result.

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Nauvoo Off The Beaten Path

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